HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Rzeszów
Rzeszów
Rzeszów
(/ˈʒɛʃuːf/,[2] Polish: [ˈʐɛʂuf] ( listen); Ukrainian: Ряшiв, Ŕašiv; German: Resche (antiquated[3]), Latin: Resovia; Yiddish: ריישע‎, rayshe) is the largest city in southeastern Poland, with a population of 189,637 (01.03.2018).[1] It is located on both sides of the Wisłok River
Wisłok River
in the heartland of the Sandomierz Basin. Rzeszów
Rzeszów
has been the capital of the Subcarpathian Voivodeship since 1 January 1999, and is also the seat of Rzeszów County. The history of Rzeszów
Rzeszów
begins in 1354, when it received city rights and privileges by Casimir III the Great. Local trade routes connecting the European Continent with the Middle East
Middle East
and the Ottoman Empire resulted in the city's early prosperity and development
[...More...]

"Rzeszów" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Vistulans
The Vistulans, or Vistulanians[1][2][3] (Polish: Wiślanie), were an early medieval West Slavic tribe inhabiting western part of modern Lesser Poland.[4] In the 9th century, they created a tribal state, with probable major centers in Kraków, Wiślica, Sandomierz, and Stradów. Probably around 874 they were subjugated by king Svatopluk I of Moravia, who was a contemporary of the emperor Arnulf, and the Vistulan duke was forced to accept baptism. After a later period of Czech domination, the Vistulan lands became controlled by the Polans in the late tenth century, and were incorporated into Poland. The area inhabited by the Vistulans
Vistulans
probably ranged from the foothills of the Carpathian Mountains
Carpathian Mountains
in the south, to the sources of the Pilica and Warta
Warta
in the north. In the east, it reached the Dunajec, and in the west, the Skawa
[...More...]

"Vistulans" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Forbes
Forbes
Forbes
(/fɔːrbz/) is an American business magazine. Published bi-weekly, it features original articles on finance, industry, investing, and marketing topics. Forbes
Forbes
also reports on related subjects such as technology, communications, science, politics, and law. Its headquarters is located in Jersey City, New Jersey. Primary competitors in the national business magazine category include Fortune and Bloomberg Businessweek. The magazine is well known for its lists and rankings, including of the richest Americans (the Forbes
Forbes
400), of the world's top companies (the Forbes
Forbes
Global 2000), and The World's Billionaires. The motto of Forbes
Forbes
magazine is "The Capitalist Tool". Its chair and editor-in-chief is Steve Forbes, and its CEO is Mike Perlis
[...More...]

"Forbes" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Baltic Sea
The Baltic Sea
Sea
is a sea of the Atlantic Ocean, enclosed by Scandinavia, Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Russia, Poland, Germany
Germany
and the North and Central European Plain. The sea stretches from 53°N to 66°N latitude and from 10°E to 30°E longitude. A mediterranean sea of the Atlantic, with limited water exchange between the two bodies, the Baltic Sea
Sea
drains through the Danish islands into the Kattegat
Kattegat
by way of the straits of Øresund, the Great Belt, and the Little Belt
[...More...]

"Baltic Sea" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Szlachta
The szlachta ([ˈʂlaxta] ( listen), exonym: Nobility) was a legally privileged noble class in the Kingdom of Poland, Grand Duchy of Lithuania, Ruthenia, Samogitia
Samogitia
(both after Union of Lublin
Union of Lublin
became a sin
[...More...]

"Szlachta" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Partitions Of Poland
The Partitions of Poland[nb 1] were three partitions of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth
Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth
that took place towards the end of the 18th century and ended the existence of the state, resulting in the elimination of sovereign Poland
Poland
and Lithuania
Lithuania
for 123 years. The partitions were conducted by Habsburg Austria, the Kingdom of Prussia, and the Russian Empire, which divided up the Commonwealth lands among themselves progressively in the process of territorial seizures and annexations.[1][2][3][4] The First Partition of Poland
Poland
was decided on August 5, 1772. Two decades later, Russian and Prussian troops entered the Commonwealth again and the Second Partition was signed on January 23, 1793. Austria did not participate in the Second Partition
[...More...]

"Partitions Of Poland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Austrian Empire
The Austrian Empire
Empire
(Austrian German: Kaiserthum Oesterreich, modern spelling Kaisertum Österreich) was a Central European multinational great power from 1804 to 1919 (losing Hungary
Hungary
in 1867) created by proclamation out of the realms of the Habsburgs. During its existence, it was the third most populous empire after the Russian Empire
Empire
and France
France
in Europe. Along with Prussia, it was one of the two major powers of the German Confederation. Geographically, it was the second largest empire in Europe after the Russian Empire
Empire
(621,538 square kilometres [239,977 sq mi]). Proclaimed in response to the First French Empire, it overlapped with the Holy Roman Empire
Holy Roman Empire
until the latter's dissolution in 1806
[...More...]

"Austrian Empire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Second Polish Republic
The Second Polish Republic, commonly known as interwar Poland, refers to the country of Poland
Poland
between the First and Second World Wars (1918–1939). Officially known as the Republic
Republic
of Poland
Poland
(Polish: Rzeczpospolita
Rzeczpospolita
Polska), the Polish state was recreated in 1918, in the aftermath of World War I. When, after several regional conflicts, the borders of the state were fixed in 1922, Poland's neighbours were Czechoslovakia, Germany, the Free City of Danzig, Lithuania, Latvia, Romania and the Soviet Union. It had access to the Baltic Sea
Baltic Sea
via a short strip of coastline either side of the city of Gdynia. Between March and August 1939, Poland
Poland
also shared a border with the then-Hungarian governorate of Subcarpathia
[...More...]

"Second Polish Republic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

World War I
Allied victoryCentral Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of the German, Russian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
and foundation of the Soviet Union Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East Transfer of German colonies
German colonies
and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers Establishment of the League of Nations
[...More...]

"World War I" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
[...More...]

"World War II" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Holocaust
The Holocaust, also referred to as the Shoah,[b] was a genocide during World War II
World War II
in which Adolf Hitler's Nazi Germany, aided by its collaborators, systematically murdered some six million European Jews, around two-thirds of the Jewish population of Europe, between 1941 and 1945.[c] Jews
Jews
were targeted for extermination as part of a larger event involving the persecution and murder of other groups, including in particular the Roma, ethnic Poles, and "incurably sick",[6] as well as political opponents, homosexuals, Jehovah's Witnesses, and Soviet prisoners of war.[7] Germany implemented the persecution in stages. Following Hitler's rise to power in 1933, the government passed laws to exclude Jews
Jews
from civil society, most prominently the Nuremberg Laws
Nuremberg Laws
in 1935
[...More...]

"Holocaust" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tourism In Poland
Poland
Poland
is a part of the global tourism market with constantly increasing number of visitors. Tourism in Poland
Poland
contributes to the country's overall economy. The most popular cities are Kraków, Warsaw, Wrocław, Gdańsk, Poznań, Szczecin, Lublin, Toruń, Zakopane, the Salt Mine in Wieliczka and the historic site of Auschwitz
Auschwitz
- German nazi concentration camp in Oświęcim. The best recreational destinations include Poland's Masurian Lake District, Baltic Sea
Baltic Sea
coast, Tatra Mountains
Tatra Mountains
(the highest mountain range of Carpathians), Sudetes
Sudetes
and Białowieża Forest. Poland's main tourist offers consist of sightseeing within cities and out-of-town historical monuments, business trips, qualified tourism, agrotourism, mountain hiking (trekking) and climbing among others
[...More...]

"Tourism In Poland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Europe
Europe
Europe
is a continent located entirely in the Northern Hemisphere
Northern Hemisphere
and mostly in the Eastern Hemisphere. It is bordered by the Arctic
Arctic
Ocean to the north, the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
to the west, and the Mediterranean Sea to the south. It comprises the westernmost part of Eurasia. Since around 1850, Europe
Europe
is most commonly considered as separated from Asia
Asia
by the watershed divides of the Ural and Caucasus
Caucasus
Mountains, the Ural River, the Caspian and Black Seas, and the waterways of the Turkish Straits.[5] Though the term "continent" implies physical geography, the land border is somewhat arbitrary and has moved since its first conception in classical antiquity
[...More...]

"Europe" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Synagogue
A synagogue, also spelled synagog (pronounced /ˈsɪnəɡɒɡ/; from Greek συναγωγή, synagogē, 'assembly', Hebrew: בית כנסת‬ bet kenesset, 'house of assembly' or בית תפילה‬ bet tefila, "house of prayer", Yiddish: שול shul, Ladino: אסנוגה esnoga or קהל kahal), is a Jewish house of prayer. Synagogues have a large place for prayer (the main sanctuary), and may also have smaller rooms for study and sometimes a social hall and offices. Some have a separate room for Torah
Torah
study, called the בית מדרש‬ beth midrash "house of study". Synagogues are consecrated spaces used for the purpose of prayer, Tanakh
Tanakh
(the entire Hebrew Bible, including the Torah) reading, study and assembly; however, a synagogue is not necessary for worship. Halakha holds that communal Jewish worship can be carried out wherever ten Jews
Jews
(a minyan) assemble
[...More...]

"Synagogue" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Eurocities
EUROCITIES is the network of major European cities, founded in 1986 by the mayors of Barcelona, Birmingham, Frankfurt, Lyon, Milan, and Rotterdam. The 1989 Barcelona
Barcelona
conference agreed that a key task was to put the issue of cities and their economic, political and social development onto the European agenda. Indeed, the founders suggested that major European cities could benefit from forming such an association. They intended to form a political platform to act as a channel for communicating with the European institutions and to become recognised as a significant partner in the European community and each member state. Today, EUROCITIES brings together the local governments of over 130 of Europe’s major cities from 35 different countries,[1] representing the interests and needs of 130 million citizens. The EUROCITIES secretariat is based in Brussels, Belgium
[...More...]

"Eurocities" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Paleolithic
The Paleolithic
Paleolithic
or Palaeolithic /ˌpæliːəˈlɪθɪk/ is a period in human prehistory distinguished by the original development of stone tools that covers c. 95% of human technological prehistory.[1] It extends from the earliest known use of stone tools by hominins c. 3.3 million years ago, to the end of the Pleistocene
Pleistocene
c. 11,650 cal BP.[2] The Paleolithic
Paleolithic
is followed in Europe by the Mesolithic, although the date of the transition varies geographically by several thousand years. During the Paleolithic, hominins grouped together in small societies such as bands, and subsisted by gathering plants and fishing, hunting or scavenging wild animals.[3] The Paleolithic
Paleolithic
is characterized by the use of knapped stone tools, although at the time humans also used wood and bone tools
[...More...]

"Paleolithic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.