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Rumpole
Rumpole of the Bailey
Rumpole of the Bailey
was a British television
British television
series created and written by the British writer and barrister John Mortimer. It starred Leo McKern
Leo McKern
as Horace Rumpole, an elderly London barrister who defended a broad variety of clients, often underdogs
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University Of Oxford
Coordinates: 51°45′40″N 1°15′12″W / 51.7611°N 1.2534°W / 51.7611; -1.2534University of OxfordCoat of armsLatin: Universitas OxoniensisMotto Dominus Illuminatio Mea (Latin)Motto in English"The Lord is my Light"Established c. 1096; 922 years ago (1096)[1]Endowment £5.069 billion (inc
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Unreliable Narrator
An unreliable narrator is a narrator, whether in literature, film, or theatre, whose credibility has been seriously compromised.[1] The term was coined in 1961 by Wayne C. Booth in The Rhetoric
Rhetoric
of Fiction.[1][2] While unreliable narrators are almost by definition first-person narrators, arguments have been made for the existence of unreliable second- and third-person narrators, especially within the context of film and television, although sometimes also in literature.[3] Sometimes the narrator's unreliability is made immediately evident. For instance, a story may open with the narrator making a plainly false or delusional claim or admitting to being severely mentally ill, or the story itself may have a frame in which the narrator appears as a character, with clues to the character's unreliability. A more dramatic use of the device delays the revelation until near the story's end
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Cheroot
The cheroot is a cylindrical cigar with both ends clipped during manufacture. Since cheroots do not taper, they are inexpensive to roll mechanically, and their low cost makes them popular. The word cheroot comes from French cheroute, from Tamil curuttu/churuttu/shuruttu (சுருட்டு), roll of tobacco. This word could have been absorbed into the French language
French language
from Tamil during the 18th century, when the French were trying to stamp their presence in South India. The word could have then been absorbed into English from French.[1]Contents1 Asia 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksAsia[edit]Preparation of cheroots, Inle Lake, Burma.Cheroots sold in the market at Nyaungshwe, Burma.Cheroots are traditional in Burma
Burma
and India, and consequently popular among the British during the days of the British Empire
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Claret
A Bordeaux
Bordeaux
wine is any wine produced in the Bordeaux
Bordeaux
region of southwest France, centered on the city of Bordeaux
Bordeaux
and covering the whole area of the Gironde
Gironde
department, with a total vineyard area of over 120,000 hectares,[1] making it the largest wine growing area in France. Average vintages produce over 700 million bottles of Bordeaux wine, ranging from large quantities of everyday table wine, to some of the most expensive and prestigious wines in the world. The vast majority of wine produced in Bordeaux
Bordeaux
is red (called "claret" in Britain), with sweet white wines (most notably Sauternes), dry whites, and (in much smaller quantities) rosé and sparkling wines (Crémant de Bordeaux) collectively making up the remainder. Bordeaux
Bordeaux
wine is made by more than 8,500 producers or châteaux
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Steak And Kidney Pudding
Steak
Steak
and kidney pudding is a savoury pudding made by enclosing diced beef steak and lamb's or pig's kidney pieces in gravy in a suet pastry.Contents1 History 2 Nickname 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] An early mention of Steak
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Wine Bar
A wine bar is a tavern-like business focusing on selling wine, rather than liquor or beer. A typical feature of many wine bars is a wide selection of wines available by the glass. Some wine bars are profiled on wines of a certain type of origin, such as Italian wine
Italian wine
or Champagne. While many wine bars are private "stand-alone" establishments, in some cases, wine bars are associated with a specific wine retailer or other outlet of wine, to provide additional marketing for that retailer's wine portfolio. In countries where licensing regulations allow this, some wine bars also sell the wines they serve, and effective function as a hybrid between a wine shop and a wine bar. In the United States[edit] Although the trend of wine bars in the United States
United States
was not well received in the 1980s, they began to gain popularity in the 1990s
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Fleet Street
A street is a public thoroughfare (usually paved) in a built environment. It is a public parcel of land adjoining buildings in an urban context, on which people may freely assemble, interact, and move about. A street can be as simple as a level patch of dirt, but is more often paved with a hard, durable surface such as concrete, cobblestone or brick. Portions may also be smoothed with asphalt, embedded with rails, or otherwise prepared to accommodate non-pedestrian traffic. Originally the word "street" simply meant a paved road (Latin: "via strata"). The word "street" is still sometimes used colloquially as a synonym for "road", for example in connection with the ancient Watling Street, but city residents and urban planners draw a crucial modern distinction: a road's main function is transportation, while streets facilitate public interaction.[1] Examples of streets include pedestrian streets, alleys, and city-centre streets too crowded for road vehicles to pass
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Thames Embankment
The Thames Embankment
Thames Embankment
is a work of 19th-century civil engineering that reclaimed marshy land next to the River Thames
River Thames
in central London. It consists of the Victoria Embankment
Victoria Embankment
and Chelsea Embankment.Contents1 History 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] There had been a long history of failed proposals to embank the Thames in central London. Embankments along the Thames were first proposed by Christopher Wren
Christopher Wren
in the 1660s, then in 1824 former soldier and aide to George IV, Sir Frederick Trench suggested an embankment[1] known as 'Trench's Terrace' from Blackfriars to Charing Cross. Trench brought a bill to Parliament which was blocked by river interests. In the 1830s, the painter John Martin promoted an embankment to contain an intercepting sewer
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Tonga
Coordinates: 20°S 175°W / 20°S 175°W / -20; -175Kingdom of Tonga Puleʻanga Fakatuʻi ʻo Tonga
Tonga
(Tongan)FlagCoat of armsMotto: "Ko e ʻOtua mo Tonga
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Windward Islands
The Windward
Windward
Islands are the southern, generally larger islands of the Lesser Antilles, within the West Indies. They lie south of the Leeward Islands, approximately between latitudes 12° and 16° N and longitudes 60° and 62° W. As a group they start from Dominica
Dominica
and reach southward to the north of Trinidad & Tobago and west of Barbados.Contents1 Name and geography 2 List of the Windward
Windward
Islands 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksName and geography[edit] The Windward
Windward
Islands are called such because they were more windward to sailing ships arriving to the New World
New World
than the Leeward Islands, given that the prevailing trade winds in the West Indies
West Indies
blow east to west
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Presumption Of Innocence
The presumption of innocence, sometimes referred to by the Latin expression ei incumbit probatio qui dicit, non qui negat (the burden of proof is on the one who declares, not on one who denies), is the principle that one is considered innocent unless proven guilty. In many states, presumption of innocence is a legal right of the accused in a criminal trial, and it is an international human right under the UN's Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Article 11. Under the presumption of innocence, the legal burden of proof is thus on the prosecution, which must collect and present compelling evidence to the trier of fact. The trier of fact (a judge or a jury) is thus restrained and ordered by law to consider only actual evidence and testimony presented in court. The prosecution must, in most cases prove that the accused is guilty beyond reasonable doubt
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Drama
Drama
Drama
is the specific mode of fiction represented in performance; a play performed in a theatre, or on radio or television.[1] Considered as a genre of poetry in general, the dramatic mode has been contrasted with the epic and the lyrical modes ever since Aristotle's Poetics (c. 335 BC)—the earliest work of dramatic theory.[2] The term "drama" comes from a Greek word meaning "action" (Classical Greek: δρᾶμα, drama), which is derived from "I do" (Classical Greek: δράω, drao). The two masks associated with drama represent the traditional generic division between comedy and tragedy. They are symbols of the ancient Greek Muses, Thalia, and Melpomene
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Plea Bargain
The plea bargain (also plea agreement or plea deal) is any agreement in a criminal case between the prosecutor and defendant whereby the defendant agrees to plead guilty or nolo contendere to a particular charge in return for some concession from the prosecutor. This may mean that the defendant will plead guilty to a less serious charge, or to one of the several charges, in return for the dismissal of other charges; or it may mean that the defendant will plead guilty to the original criminal charge in return for a more lenient sentence.[1] A plea bargain allows both parties to avoid a lengthy criminal trial and may allow criminal defendants to avoid the risk of conviction at trial on a more serious charge. For example, in the U.S
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The Daily Telegraph
The Daily Telegraph, known online as The Telegraph, is a national British daily broadsheet newspaper published in London
London
by Telegraph Media Group and distributed across the United Kingdom and internationally. It was founded by Arthur B
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Football Hooligan
Football hooliganism[1] is the term used to describe disorderly, violent or destructive behaviour perpetrated by spectators at football events.[2] Football hooliganism
Football hooliganism
normally involves conflict between gangs, often known as football firms (the term derives from the British slang for a criminal gang), formed for the purpose of intimidating and physically attacking supporters of other teams. Other terms commonly used in connection with hooligan firms include "army", "boys", "casuals", and "crew". Certain clubs have long-standing rivalries with other clubs and hooliganism associated with matches between them (sometimes called local derbies) is likely to be more severe. Conflict may take place before, during or after matches
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