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Ruma
Ruma
Ruma
(Serbian Cyrillic: Рума) is a town and municipality located in the Srem District
Srem District
of the Autonomous Province of Vojvodina, Serbia. As of 2011, the town has a population of 30,076, while the municipality has a population of 54,339 inhabitants.Contents1 History 2 Inhabited places 3 Demographics3.1 Ethnic groups4 Economy 5 Notable citizens 6 Sister cities 7 Image gallery 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksHistory[edit] Traces of organized human life on the territory of Ruma
Ruma
municipality date back as far as prehistory
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Illyrians
Pontic SteppeDomestication of the horse Kurgan Kurgan
Kurgan
culture Steppe culturesBug-Dniester Sredny Stog Dnieper-Donets Samara Khvalynsk YamnaMikhaylovka cultureCaucasusMaykopEast-AsiaAfanasevoEastern EuropeUsatovo Cernavodă CucuteniNorthern EuropeCorded wareBaden Middle DnieperBronze AgePontic SteppeChariot Yamna Catacomb Multi-cordoned ware Poltavka SrubnaNorthern/Eastern SteppeAbashevo culture Andronovo SintashtaEuropeGlobular Amphora Corded ware Beaker Unetice Trzciniec Nordic Bronze Age Terramare Tumulus
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Bulgarian Empire
In the medieval history of Europe, Bulgaria's status as the Bulgarian Empire
Empire
(Bulgarian: Българско царство, Balgarsko tsarstvo [ˈbəlɡɐrskʊ ˈt͡sarstvʊ]), wherein it acted as a key regional power (particularly rivaling Byzantium in Southeastern Europe[1]) occurred in two distinct periods: between the seventh and eleventh centuries, and again between the twelfth and fourteenth centuries
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Bosut Culture
Bosut culture
Bosut culture
(Serbian: Bosutska kultura / Босутска култура or Bosutska grupa / Босутска група) is a name of an prehistoric Iron Age
Iron Age
culture, which was named after Gradina on Bosut archaeological site in Serbia. It is sometimes grouped with related Basarabi culture
Basarabi culture
into Bosut- Basarabi
Basarabi
complex
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Amantini
Amantini (Greek Ἄμαντες) was the name of an Pannonian[1] Illyrian tribe.[2] They greatly resisted the Romans but were sold as slaves after their defeat.[3] The Amantini were close to Sirmium[4] but the tribe was probably present in southern areas as well due to the existence of a city name Amantia.[5] This would make the south Amantini the southernmost Illyrian tribe. References[edit]^ Dalmatia Tome 2 of History of the provinces of the Roman Empire by J. J. Wilkes, 1969, page 534 ^ Wilkes, J. J. The Illyrians, 1992, ISBN 0-631-19807-5, page 218, "Except for the Latobici and Varciani, whose names are Celtic, the civitates of Colapiani, Jasi, Breuci, Amantini and Scordisci
Scordisci
were Illyrian." ^ Wilkes, J. J
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Scordisci
The Scordisci
Scordisci
(Greek: Σκορδίσκοι, Serbian: Скордисци) were a Celtic Iron Age
Iron Age
tribe centered in the territory of present-day Serbia, at the confluence of the Savus (Sava), Dravus (Drava) and Danube
Danube
rivers. They were historically notable from the beginning of the third century BC until the turn of the common era. The Scordisci
Scordisci
consolidated into a tribal state. At their zenith, their core territory stretched over regions comprising parts of present-day Serbia, Croatia, Bulgaria
Bulgaria
and Romania, while their influence spread even further
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Huns
The Huns
Huns
were a nomadic people who lived in Eastern Europe, the Caucasus, and Central Asia
Central Asia
between the 4th and 6th century AD. According to European tradition, they were first reported living east of the Volga River, in an area that
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Germanic Peoples
The Germanic peoples
Germanic peoples
(also called Teutonic, Suebian, or Gothic in older literature) are an Indo-European ethno-linguistic group of Northern European origin.[1] They are identified by their use of Germanic languages, which diversified out of Proto-Germanic
Proto-Germanic
during the Pre-Roman Iron Age.[2] The term "Germanic" originated in classical times when groups of tribes living in Lower, Upper, and Greater Germania
Germania
were referred to using this label by Roman scribes. The Roman use of the term "Germanic" was not necessarily based upon language, but referred to the tribal groups and alliances that lived in the regions of modern-day Luxembourg, Belgium, Northern France, Alsace, Poland, Austria, the Netherlands
Netherlands
and Germany, and which were considered less civilized and more physically hardened than the Celtic Gauls
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Pannonian Avars
The Pannonian Avars
Pannonian Avars
(/ˈævɑːrz/; also known as the Obri in chronicles of Rus, the Abaroi or Varchonitai[2] (Varchonites) or Pseudo-Avars[3] in Byzantine sources) were a group of Eurasian nomads of unknown origin[4][5][6][7][8] during the early Middle Ages.[9] The name Pannonian Avars
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Slavs
Slavs
Slavs
are an Indo-European ethno-linguistic group who speak the various Slavic languages
Slavic languages
of the larger Balto-Slavic linguistic group. They are native to Eurasia, stretching from Central, Eastern, and Southeastern Europe
Europe
all the way north and westwards to Northeast Europe
Europe
, Northern Asia (Siberia), the Caucasus, and Central Asia (especially Kazakhstan
Kazakhstan
and Turkmenistan) as well as historically in Western Europe
Europe
(particularly in East Germany) and Western Asia (including Anatolia)
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Kingdom Of Hungary
Magyar Királyság  (Hungarian) Regnum Hungariae  (Latin) Königreich Ungarn  (German)1000–1918 1920–1946Flag (1867-1918)Coat of armsMotto Regnum Mariae Patrona Hungariae[1] "Kingdom of Mary, the Patron of Hungary"Anthem Himnusz HymnRoyal anthem God save, God protect Our Emperor, Our Country!Kingdoms of Hungary (dark green) and Croatia-Slavonia (light green) within Austria-Hungary in 1914Capital BudapestHistorical capitals:Esztergom (10th to mid-13th century) Buda (mid-13th century to 1541)a Pressburg (1536–1783) Debrecen (1849) Székesfehérvár (place of diets, royal seat, crowning and burial site from 1000 to 1543)Languages Official languages:Latin (1000–1784; 1790–1844) German (1784–1790; 1849–1867) Hungarian (1836–1849; 1867–1946)Other spoken languages: Polish, Romanian, Slovak, Croatian, Slovene, Serbian, Italian, Ruthenian, Carpathian Romani,
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Serbian Cyrillic Alphabet
The Serbian Cyrillic
Cyrillic
alphabet (Serbian: српска ћирилица/srpska ćirilica, pronounced [sr̩̂pskaː t͡ɕirǐlit͡sa]) is an adaptation of the Cyrillic script
Cyrillic script
for the Serbian language, developed in 1818 by Serbian linguist Vuk Karadžić. It is one of the two alphabets used to write standard modern Serbian, Bosnian and Montenegrin, the other being Latin. Karadžić based his alphabet on the previous "Slavonic-Serbian" script, following the principle of "write as you speak and read as it is written", removing obsolete letters and letters representing iotified vowels, introducing ⟨J⟩ from the Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
instead, and adding several consonant letters for sounds specific to Serbian phonology. During the same period, Croatian linguists led by Ljudevit Gaj adapted the Latin alphabet, in use in western South Slavic areas, using the same principles
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Human Settlement
In geography, statistics and archaeology, a settlement, locality or populated place is a community in which people live. A settlement can range in size from a small number of dwellings grouped together to the largest of cities with surrounding urbanized areas. Settlements may include hamlets, villages, towns and cities
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Ottoman Empire
The Ottoman Empire (/ˈɒtəmən/; Devlet-i ʿAlīye-i ʿOsmānīye[dn 5]), also historically known in Western Europe
Europe
as the Turkish Empire[8] or simply Turkey,[9] was a state that controlled much of southeastern Europe, western Asia and northern Africa between the 14th and early 20th centuries. It was founded at the end of the 13th century in northwestern Anatolia
Anatolia
in the town of Söğüt (modern-day Bilecik Province) by the Oghuz Turkish tribal leader Osman.[10] After 1354, the Ottomans crossed into Europe, and with the conquest of the Balkans, the Ottoman Beylik was transformed into a transcontinental empire
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Defter
A defter (plural: defterler) was a type of tax register and land cadastre in the Ottoman Empire. The information collected could vary, but tahrir defterleri typically included details of villages, dwellings, household heads (adult males and widows), ethnicity/religion (because these could affect tax liabilities/exemptions), and land use.[1] The defter-i hakâni was a land registry, also used for tax purposes.[2] Each town had a defter and typically an officiator or someone in an administrative role to determine if the information should be recorded. The officiator was usually some kind of learned man who had knowledge of state regulations. The defter was used to record family interactions such as marriage and inheritance.[3] These records are useful for historians because such information allows for a more in-depth understanding of land ownership among Ottomans
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Serbs
OverseasUnited States Canada Australia New Zealand Argentina Brazil Venezuela South Africa TurkeyCultureSymbolsReligionSlava Christmas
Christmas
traditionsCultural Heritage sites ArchitectureArt LiteratureEpic poetryMusic CinemaCostume Dances Cuisine KinshipSportHistoryName History of Serbs History of Serbia Serbian lands Serbian rulersLanguageSerbianShtokavian Torlakian Church SlavonicOldSerbo-Croat South SlavicRelated groupsBosniaks Bunjevci Croats Gallipoli Serbs Gorani Janjevci Krashovani Macedonians Torbesi Mijaks Montenegrins Muslims by ethnicity Serb Muslims Shopi Šokci South Slavsv t eThe Serbs
Serbs
(Serbian: Срби / Srbi, pronounced [sr̩̂bi]) are a South Slavic ethnic group that formed in the Balkans
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