HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Rue De La Bourse
The Rue de la Bourse
Rue de la Bourse
is a street located mainly in the 2nd arrondissement of Lyon, and also in the 1st arrondissement. It starts on the Place des Cordeliers, in the 2nd arrondissement, in front of the Église Saint-Bonaventure, and ends at right angles to the Rue du Bât-d'Argent, beyond which it is extended by the Rue du Garet. History[edit] The street was named after the Palais de la Bourse,[1] built between 1855 and 1862, by René Dardel, which is situated in its southern part.[2] In the 17th century, the part along the Collège de la Trinité was named Rue Henri from 1526 to 1528, as tribute to the vicar of Saint Paul parish, Henri Guillermet. In 1528, the northern part of the street was opened and named Rue du Baronnat after the name of one of the owner of the lands, then named Rue du Vert-Galant after a sign at number 13
[...More...]

"Rue De La Bourse" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Street
A street is a public thoroughfare (usually paved) in a built environment. It is a public parcel of land adjoining buildings in an urban context, on which people may freely assemble, interact, and move about. A street can be as simple as a level patch of dirt, but is more often paved with a hard, durable surface such as concrete, cobblestone or brick. Portions may also be smoothed with asphalt, embedded with rails, or otherwise prepared to accommodate non-pedestrian traffic. Originally the word "street" simply meant a paved road (Latin: "via strata"). The word "street" is still sometimes used colloquially as a synonym for "road", for example in connection with the ancient Watling Street, but city residents and urban planners draw a crucial modern distinction: a road's main function is transportation, while streets facilitate public interaction.[1] Examples of streets include pedestrian streets, alleys, and city-centre streets too crowded for road vehicles to pass
[...More...]

"Street" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Denis-Simon De Marquemont
Denis-Simon de Marquemont (30 September 1572 – 16 September 1626) was a French cleric who became Archbishop of Lyon in 1612.[1] Early life[edit] De Marquemont was born on 30 September 1572 in Paris, France. He was educated at the University of Paris and the University of Angers and received a doctorate in utroque iure. In 1594 he travelled to Rome as secretary to Jacques Davy Duperron. When Duperron left Rome, de Maquemont remained behind, by order of Henry IV, as counsellor to the French ambassador to the Holy See
[...More...]

"Denis-Simon De Marquemont" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

1st Arrondissement Of Lyon
An arrondissement (/əˈrɒndɪsmənt/; French: [aʁɔ̃dismɑ̃]) is any of various administrative divisions of France, Belgium, Haiti, certain other Francophone countries, and the Netherlands.Contents1 Europe1.1 France1.1.1 Municipal arrondissement1.2 Belgium 1.3 Netherlands 1.4 Switzerland 1.5 Post-Soviet states2 Francophone
Francophone
Africa 3 North America3.1 Haiti 3.2 Quebec4 External linksEurope[edit] France[edit] Main article: Arrondissements of France The 101 French departments are divided into 342 arrondissements, which may be roughly translated into English as districts. The capital of an arrondissement is called a subprefecture. When an arrondissement contains the prefecture (capital) of the department, that prefecture is the capital of the arrondissement, acting both as a prefecture and as a subprefecture
[...More...]

"1st Arrondissement Of Lyon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Boulevard De La Croix-Rousse
Boulevard
Boulevard
de la Croix-Rousse
Croix-Rousse
is a boulevard that marks the border between the 1st and the 4th arrondissements of Lyon, in the neighborhood Croix-Rousse.Contents1 Location 2 History 3 Monuments 4 Events 5 Accessibility 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksLocation[edit] The boulevard runs east–west and is the border between the 1st and 4th arrondissements and the neighborhoods Pentes de la Croix-Rousse (fr) and Plateau de la Croix-Rousse.[1] History[edit] The Croix-Rousse
Croix-Rousse
ramparts were reconstructed in 1834 on the remains of 16th century ramparts, which had been demolished during the revolt of Lyon
Lyon
against the National Convention in 1793. In 1852 when Croix-Rousse
Croix-Rousse
became a quarter of Lyon
Lyon
the ramparts were destroyed to facilitate the integration of the new quarter
[...More...]

"Boulevard De La Croix-Rousse" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Caryatid
A caryatid (/kæriˈætɪd/ kair-ee-AT-id; Greek: Καρυάτις, plural: Καρυάτιδες) is a sculpted female figure serving as an architectural support taking the place of a column or a pillar supporting an entablature on her head
[...More...]

"Caryatid" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Transom (architectural)
In architecture, a transom is a transverse horizontal structural beam or bar, or a crosspiece separating a door from a window above it. This contrasts with a mullion, a vertical structural member.[1] Transom or transom window is also the customary U.S. word used for a transom light, the window over this crosspiece.[1][2] In Britain, the transom light is usually referred to as a fanlight, often with a semi-circular shape, especially when the window is segmented like the slats of a folding hand fan. A well-known example of this is at the main entrance of 10 Downing Street, London.[3]Contents1 History 2 Function 3 Idiomatic usage 4 Japan 5 See also 6 ReferencesHistory[edit] In early Gothic ecclesiastical work, transoms are found only in belfry unglazed windows or spire lights, where they were deemed necessary to strengthen the mullions in the absence of the iron stay bars, which in glazed windows served a similar purpose
[...More...]

"Transom (architectural)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

City Hall
In local government, a city hall, town hall, civic centre, (in the UK or Australia) a guildhall, a Rathaus (German), or (more rarely) a municipal building, is the chief administrative building of a city,[2] town, or other municipality. It usually houses the city or town council, its associated departments, and their employees. It also usually functions as the base of the mayor of a city, town, borough, or county/shire. By convention, until the mid 19th-century, a single large open chamber (or 'hall') formed an integral part of the building housing the council. The hall may be used for council meetings and other significant events. This large chamber, the 'town hall', (and its later variant 'city hall') has become synonymous with the whole building, and with the administrative body housed in it
[...More...]

"City Hall" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Groupe Caisse D'Epargne
Groupe Caisse d'épargne is a French semi-cooperative[dubious – discuss] banking group, founded in 1818, with around 4700 branches in the country. The group is active in retail and private banking, as well as holding a significant stake in the publicly traded investment bank Natixis.Contents1 Operations 2 Trading loss 3 Merger 4 Sponsorship 5 References 6 External linksOperations[edit] The group's most notable brand is the Caisse d'épargne network of mutual savings banks
[...More...]

"Groupe Caisse D'Epargne" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Granite
Granite
Granite
( /ˈɡrænɪt/) is a common type of felsic intrusive igneous rock that is granular and phaneritic in texture. Granites can be predominantly white, pink, or gray in color, depending on their mineralogy. The word "granite" comes from the Latin
Latin
granum, a grain, in reference to the coarse-grained structure of such a holocrystalline rock. Strictly speaking, granite is an igneous rock with between 20% and 60% quartz by volume, and at least 35% of the total feldspar consisting of alkali feldspar, although commonly the term "granite" is used to refer to a wider range of coarse grained igneous rocks containing quartz and feldspar. The term "granitic" means granite-like and is applied to granite and a group of intrusive igneous rocks with similar textures and slight variations in composition and origin
[...More...]

"Granite" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Étienne Martellange
Étienne Martellange (22 December 1569, Lyon - 3 October 1641, Paris) was a French Jesuit architect and draftsman. He travelled widely in France as an itinerant architect for the Jesuit order and designed more than 25 buildings, mostly schools and their associated chapels or churches. His buildings reflect the Baroque style of the Counter-Reformation and include the Chapelle de la Trinité in Lyon and the church of Saint-Paul-Saint-Louis in Paris. In the course of his travels he made almost 200 detailed pen drawings depicting views of towns, buildings and monuments
[...More...]

"Étienne Martellange" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Hôtel De Ville, Lyon
An hôtel particulier (French pronunciation: ​[otɛl paʁtikylje]; "hôtel" being rendered in Middle English as "inn"—as only used now in Inns of Court—and "particulier" meaning "personal" or "private")[1] is a townhouse of a grand sort, comparable to the British townhouse
[...More...]

"Hôtel De Ville, Lyon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

France
France
France
(French: [fʁɑ̃s]), officially the French Republic (French: République française [ʁepyblik fʁɑ̃sɛz]), is a country whose territory consists of metropolitan France
France
in western Europe, as well as several overseas regions and territories.[XIII] The metropolitan area of France
France
extends from the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the English Channel
English Channel
and the North Sea, and from the Rhine
Rhine
to the Atlantic Ocean. The overseas territories include French Guiana
French Guiana
in South America and several islands in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans
[...More...]

"France" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Lyon
Centre: Parc de la Tête d'Or, Confluence district and the Vieux Lyon. Bottom: Pont Lafayette, Part-Dieu district with the Place Bellecour
Place Bellecour
in foreground during Festival of Lights.FlagCoat of armsMotto(s): Avant, avant, Lion le melhor. (Old Franco-Provençal: Forward, forward, Lyon
[...More...]

"Lyon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.