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Royal Worcester
Royal Worcester
Worcester
is believed to be the oldest or second oldest remaining English porcelain brand still in existence today, established in 1751 (this is disputed by Royal Crown Derby, which claims 1750 as its year of establishment). Since 2009 part of the Portmeirion Group, Royal Worcester
Worcester
remains in the luxury tableware and giftware market, although production in Worcester
Worcester
itself has ended. Technically, the Worcester
Worcester
Royal Porcelain
Porcelain
Co. Ltd. known as Royal Worcester
Worcester
was formed in 1862, and wares produced before this are known as Worcester
Worcester
porcelain, although the company had a royal warrant from 1788
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List Of Business Entities
A business entity is an entity that is formed and administered as per corporate law in order to engage in business activities, charitable work, or other activities allowable. Most often, business entities are formed to sell a product or a service. There are many types of business entities defined in the legal systems of various countries. These include corporations, cooperatives, partnerships, sole traders, limited liability company and other specifically permitted and labelled types of entities. The specific rules vary by country and by state or province
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King William IV Of The United Kingdom
William IV (William Henry; 21 August 1765 – 20 June 1837) was King of the United Kingdom
King of the United Kingdom
and King of Hanover
King of Hanover
from 26 June 1830 until his death. The third son of George III, William succeeded his elder brother George IV, as the last king and penultimate monarch of Britain's House of Hanover. William served in the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
in his youth and was, both during his reign and afterwards, nicknamed the "Sailor King".[1][2] He served in North America and the Caribbean. In 1789, he was created Duke
Duke
of Clarence and St Andrews. In 1827, he was appointed as Britain's first Lord High Admiral
Admiral
since 1709. Since his two older brothers died without leaving legitimate issue, he inherited the throne when he was 64 years old
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Celadon
Celadon
Celadon
is a term for pottery denoting both wares glazed in the jade green celadon color, also known as greenware (the term specialists now tend to use)[1] and a type of transparent glaze, often with small cracks, that was first used on greenware, but later used on other porcelains. Celadon
Celadon
originated in China, though the term is purely European, and notable kilns such as the Longquan kiln in Zhejiang province are renowned for their celadon glazes.[2] Celadon
Celadon
production later spread to other regions in Asia, such as Japan, Korea[3] and Thailand. Eventually European potteries produced some pieces, but it was never a major element there. Finer pieces are in porcelain, but both the color and the glaze can be produced in stoneware and earthenware
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Ashmolean Museum
The Ashmolean Museum
Ashmolean Museum
(in full the Ashmolean Museum
Ashmolean Museum
of Art
Art
and Archaeology) on Beaumont Street, Oxford, England, is the world's first university museum.[1] Its first building was erected in 1678–83 to house the cabinet of curiosities that Elias Ashmole
Elias Ashmole
gave to the University of Oxford
Oxford
in 1677. After a major redevelopment, the museum reopened in 2009. In November 2011, new galleries focusing on Egypt
Egypt
and Nubia
Nubia
were unveiled
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Charity Commission For England And Wales
The Charity Commission for England and Wales
England and Wales
is the non-ministerial government department that regulates registered charities in England and Wales and maintains the Central Register of Charities. The Charity Commission answers directly to the UK Parliament rather than to Government ministers. It is governed by a board, which is assisted by the Chief Executive (currently Helen Stephenson CBE who succeeded Paula Sussex in July 2017 ) and an executive team.[2] The current Chair is William Shawcross.[3] The previous Chair was Dame Suzi Leather, DBE, who was appointed Chair of the Commission's board on 1 August 2006, after being chair of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority and the School Food Trust.[4] Geraldine Peacock was Chief Charity Commissioner (as previous chairs of the Commission have been known) from 2003 to 2006, and Chair-designate from 8 July 2004 to 2006
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Merger
Mergers and acquisitions
Mergers and acquisitions
(M&A) are transactions in which the ownership of companies, other business organizations or their operating units are transferred or combined. As an aspect of strategic management, M&A can allow enterprises to grow, shrink, and change the nature of their business or competitive position. From a legal point of view, a merger is a legal consolidation of two entities into one entity, whereas an acquisition occurs when one entity takes ownership of another entity's stock, equity interests or assets. From a commercial and economic point of view, both types of transactions generally result in the consolidation of assets and liabilities under one entity, and the distinction between a "merger" and an "acquisition" is less clear
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Vale Of Evesham
Evesham (/ˈivʃəm/, /ˈivɪʃəm/, or /ˈisəm/)[2] is a market town and parish in the Wychavon district of Worcestershire, southern England with a population of 23,576, according to the 2011 census. It is located roughly equidistant between Worcester, Cheltenham and Stratford-upon-Avon. It lies within the Vale of Evesham, an area comprising the flood plain of the River Avon, which has been renowned for market gardening. The town centre, situated within a meander of the river, is regularly subject to flooding. The 2007 floods were the most severe in recorded history. The town was founded around an 8th-century abbey, one of the largest in Europe, which was destroyed during the Dissolution of the Monasteries, with only Abbot Lichfield's Bell Tower remaining
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Victorian Era
In the history of the United Kingdom, the Victorian era
Victorian era
was the period of Queen Victoria's reign, from 20 June 1837 until her death on 22 January 1901. The era followed the Georgian period and preceded the Edwardian period, and its later half overlaps with the first part of the Belle Époque
Belle Époque
era of continental Europe. Defined according to sensibilities and political concerns, the period is sometimes considered to begin with the passage of the Reform Act 1832
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Indianapolis Museum Of Art
The Indianapolis
Indianapolis
Museum
Museum
of Art (known colloquially as the IMA) is an encyclopedic art museum located in Indianapolis, Indiana, United States
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Privately Held Company
A privately held company, private company, or close corporation is a business company owned either by non-governmental organizations or by a relatively small number of shareholders or company members which does not offer or trade its company stock (shares) to the general public on the stock market exchanges, but rather the company's stock is offered, owned and traded or exchanged privately. More ambiguous terms for a privately held company are unquoted company and unlisted company. Though less visible than their publicly traded counterparts, private companies have major importance in the world's economy. In 2008, the 441 largest private companies in the United States accounted for US$1,800,000,000,000 in revenues and employed 6.2 million people, according to Forbes. In 2005, using a substantially smaller pool size (22.7%) for comparison, the 339 companies on Forbes' survey of closely held U.S
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Princess Charlotte Of Wales
Princess Charlotte Augusta of Wales (7 January 1796 – 6 November 1817) was the only child of the British king George IV, who was still Prince of Wales
Prince of Wales
during her lifetime, and Caroline of Brunswick. If she had outlived both her grandfather King George III and her father, she would have become Queen of the United Kingdom, but she died following childbirth at the age of 21. Charlotte's parents disliked each other from before their arranged marriage and soon separated. The Prince of Wales
Prince of Wales
left most of Charlotte's care to governesses and servants, but only allowed her limited contact with Caroline, who eventually left the country. As Charlotte grew to adulthood, her father pressured her to marry William, Hereditary Prince of Orange (later King of the Netherlands), but after initially accepting him, Charlotte soon broke off the intended match
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George IV Of The United Kingdom
George IV (George Augustus Frederick; 12 August 1762 – 26 June 1830) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland
United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland
and of Hanover following the death of his father, King George III, on 29 January 1820, until his own death ten years later. From 1811 until his accession, he served as Prince Regent during his father's final mental illness. George IV led an extravagant lifestyle that contributed to the fashions of the Regency era. He was a patron of new forms of leisure, style and taste
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Royal Warrant Of Appointment (United Kingdom)
Royal warrants of appointment have been issued for centuries to those who supply goods or services to a royal court or certain royal personages. The warrant enables the supplier to advertise the fact that they supply to the royal family, so lending prestige to the supplier. In the United Kingdom, grants are currently made by the three most senior members of the British Royal Family
British Royal Family
to companies or tradesmen who supply goods and services to individuals in the family. Suppliers continue to charge for their goods and services – a warrant does not imply that they provide goods and services free of charge. The warrant is typically advertised on billboards (or company hoardings in British English), letter-heads and products by displaying the coat of arms or the heraldic badge of the royal personage as appropriate
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