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Royal Military Academy, Woolwich
The Royal Military Academy (RMA) at Woolwich, in south-east London, was a British Army
British Army
military academy for the training of commissioned officers of the Royal Artillery
Royal Artillery
and Royal Engineers. It later also trained officers of the Royal Corps of Signals
Royal Corps of Signals
and other technical corps
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United Kingdom
The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(UK) or Britain, is a sovereign country in western Europe
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Crimean War
223,513  Ottoman Empire 45,400[2] 10,100 killed in action 10,800 died of wounds 24,500 died of disease French Empire 135,485[2] 8,490 killed in action; 11,750 died of wounds; 75,375 died of disease 39,870 wounded  British Empire 40,462[2] 2,755 killed in action 1,847 died of wounds 17,580 died of disease 18,280 wounded  Kingdom of Sardinia 2,166[2] 28 killed in action 2,138 died of disease 530,125[2] 35,671 killed in action 37,454 died of wounds 377,000 died from non-combat causes 80,000 wounded[3][4]v t eCrimean WarBalkansOltenița Sinop Cetate Calafat SilistraCaucasusKurekdere KarsNaval OperationsSuomenlinna Bomarsund PetropavlovskCrimeaAlma Sevastopol Balaclava Inkerman Eupatoria Taganrog Chernaya Malakoff Great Redan Kinburnv t eRusso-Ottoman Wars1568–70 1676–81 1686–1700 1710–11 1735–39 1768–74 1787–92 1806–12 1828–29 1853–56 1877–78 1914–18Russ
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Cue Game
Cue sports
Cue sports
(sometimes written cuesports), also known as billiard sports,[1][2] are a wide variety of games of skill generally played with a cue stick, which is used to strike billiard balls and thereby cause them to move around a cloth-covered billiards table bounded by elastic bumpers known as cushions. Historically, the umbrella term was billiards. While that familiar name is still employed by some as a generic label for all such games, the word's usage has splintered into more exclusive competing meanings in various parts of the world
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Great Marlow
Great Marlow
Great Marlow
is a civil parish within Wycombe district
Wycombe district
in the English county of Buckinghamshire
Buckinghamshire
located north of the town of Marlow and south of High Wycombe. The parish includes the hamlets of Bovingdon Green, Burroughs Grove, Chisbridge Cross and Marlow Common, and Danesfield, a housing estate for predominantly RAF
RAF
officers, although families of other ranks from the RAF, Royal Navy
Royal Navy
and British Army
British Army
also live there. Prior to November 2007 the major settlement in Great Marlow was Marlow Bottom
Marlow Bottom
which has now become a civil parish in its own right. The parish has been so named since Norman times
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East India Company
The East India
India
Company (EIC), also known as the Honourable East India Company (HEIC) or the British East India
India
Company and informally as John Company,[1] was an English and later British joint-stock company,[2] that was formed to pursue trade with the "East Indies"[citation needed] (in present-day terms, Maritime Southeast Asia), but ended up trading mainly with Qing China
Qing China
and seizing control of large parts of the Indian subcontinent. Originally chartered as the "Governor and Company of Merchants of London trading into the East Indies", the company rose to account for half of the world's trade[citation needed], particularly in basic commodities including cotton, silk, indigo dye, salt, saltpetre, tea, and opium
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British Army
The British Army
Army
is the principal land warfare force of the United Kingdom, a part of British Armed Forces. As of 2017, the British Army comprises just over 80,000 trained regular (full-time) personnel and just over 26,500 trained reserve (part-time) personnel.[4] Since April 2013, Ministry of Defence publications have not reported the entire strength of the Regular Reserve; instead, only Regular Reserves serving under the fixed-term reserve contracts have been counted.[5] The modern British Army
Army
traces back to 1707, with an antecedent in the English Army
Army
that was created during the Restoration in 1660
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Muster Roll
The term muster means the process or event of accounting for members in a military unit. This practice of inspections led to the coining of the English idiom pass muster, meaning being sufficient. When a unit is created, it is "mustered in" and when it is disbanded, it is "mustered out". A muster roll is the list of members of a military unit, often including their rank and the dates they joined or left
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Public School (United Kingdom)
A public school in England and Wales
England and Wales
is an older, student-selective, fee-charging independent secondary school that caters primarily for children aged between 11 or 13 and 18, and whose head teacher is a member of the Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference[1] (HMC). The term "public" should not be misunderstood to mean that these schools are part of the public sector (that is, funded from public taxes); they are in fact part of the private sector
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Edward Mogg
Edward Mogg
Edward Mogg
was a publisher in London
London
in the 19th century.[1] He issued maps and travel guides to London
London
and other localities in England and Wales.[2] Mogg's publications appear in works of fiction such as Robert Smith Surtees' Mr. Sponge's Sporting Tour and Shirley Brooks' The Naggletons.[3][4]Contents1 Further reading1.1 1800s-1810s 1.2 1820s-1830s 1.3 1840s-1850s2 References 3 External linksFurther reading[edit]Survey of the high roads of England and Wales1800s-1810s[edit] Edward Mogg
Edward Mogg
(1800), Street Directory; Being a List of all the Streets, &c. in London [5] London
London
in Miniature (2nd ed.), London: E
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UK Parliament
HM Government     Conservative Party (245)Confidence and supply     Democratic Unionist
Democratic Unionist
Party (3)HM Most Loyal Opposition     Labour Party (191)Other opposition     Liberal Democrats (98)      Non-affiliated (29)      UKIP (3)      Ind. Labour (3)      Ulster Unionist Party
Ulster Unionist Party
(2)      Green Party (1)      Ind. Social Democrat (1)      Ind
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Tudor Gothic Architecture
English Gothic is an architectural style originating in France, before then flourishing in England from about 1180 until about 1520. As with the Gothic architecture of other parts of Europe, English Gothic is defined by its pointed arches, vaulted roofs, buttresses, large windows, and spires. The Gothic style was introduced from France, where the various elements had first been used together within a single building at the choir of the Basilique Saint-Denis north of Paris, built by the Abbot Suger and dedicated on 11 June 1144.[1] The earliest large-scale applications of Gothic architecture in England are at Canterbury Cathedral and Westminster Abbey. Many features of Gothic architecture had evolved naturally from Romanesque architecture (often known in England as Norman architecture)
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Infantry
Infantry
Infantry
is the branch of an army that engages in military combat on foot, distinguished from cavalry, artillery, and tank forces. Also known as foot soldiers, infantry traditionally relies on moving by foot between combats as well, but may also use mounts, military vehicles, or other transport
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Cavalry
Cavalry
Cavalry
(from French cavalerie, cf. cheval 'horse') or horsemen were soldiers or warriors who fought mounted on horseback. Cavalry
Cavalry
were historically the most mobile of the combat arms. An individual soldier in the cavalry is known by a number of designations such as cavalryman, horseman, dragoon or trooper. The designation of cavalry was not usually given to any military forces that used other animals, such as camels, mules or elephants. Infantry
Infantry
who moved on horseback, but dismounted to fight on foot, were known in the 17th and early 18th centuries as dragoons, a class of mounted infantry which later evolved into cavalry proper while retaining their historic title. Cavalry
Cavalry
had the advantage of improved mobility, and a man fighting from horseback also had the advantages of greater height, speed, and inertial mass over an opponent on foot
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Second World War
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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Grade II Listed
A listed building or listed structure is one that has been placed on one of the four statutory lists maintained by Historic England
Historic England
in England, Historic Environment Scotland
Historic Environment Scotland
in Scotland, Cadw
Cadw
in Wales, and the Northern Ireland Environment Agency in Northern Ireland. The term has also been used in Ireland, where buildings are surveyed for the National Inventory of Architectural Heritage
National Inventory of Architectural Heritage
in accordance with the country's obligations under the Granada Convention. However, the preferred term in Ireland is protected structure.[1] A listed building may not be demolished, extended, or altered without special permission from the local planning authority, which typically consults the relevant central government agency, particularly for significant alterations to the more notable listed buildings
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