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Royal Entomological Society Handbooks
Handbooks for the Identification of British Insects is a series of books produced by the Royal Entomological Society (RES). The aim of the Handbooks is to provide illustrated identification keys to the insects of Britain, together with concise morphological, biological and distributional information. The series also includes several Check Lists of British Insects. All books contain line drawings, with the most recent volumes including colour photographs
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Coccinellidae
Coccinellidae
Coccinellidae
(/ˌkɒksɪˈnɛlɪdiː/)[3] is a widespread family of small beetles ranging from 0.8 to 18 mm (0.03 to 0.71 inches).[4] They are commonly yellow, orange, or red with small black spots on their wing covers, with black legs, heads and antennae. However such colour patterns vary greatly. For example, a minority of species, such as Vibidia duodecimguttata, a twelve-spotted species, have whitish spots on a brown background. Coccinellids are found worldwide, with over 6,000 species described.[5][6] Coccinellids are known as ladybugs in North America, and ladybirds in Britain and other parts of the English-speaking world
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Histeroidea
Histeridae Sphaeritidae SynteliidaeHisteroidea is a superfamily of beetles in the infraorder Staphyliniformia.Contents1 Characteristics 2 Systematics 3 External links 4 ReferencesCharacteristics[edit] Characteristic to Histeroidea are an accessory posterior ridge (locking device) behind the hind margin and presence of medial loop and apical hinge of wing. Elytra truncate, 1 or 2 abdominal segments visible, abdominal 8th segment completely invaginated in the 7th segment. Antennae have 8 (seldom 7) segments preceding a club of fused segments. Ventral body surface glabrous.[1] Systematics[edit] Some authors treat Histeroidea as a single family within the superfamily Hydrophiloidea (Hydrophiloidea sensu lato), as they seem to form a clade.[2] Three families are currently recognized:Histeridae Sphaeritidae SynteliidaeExternal links[edit]Tree of Life web projectReferences[edit]^ M.Hansen. Phylogeny and classification of the staphyliniform beetle families (Coleoptera)
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Aphidoidea
Aphids are small sap-sucking insects and members of the superfamily Aphidoidea. Common names include greenfly and blackfly,[a] but the insects can also be brown or pink, and the group includes the fluffy white woolly aphids. A typical life cycle involves flightless females giving living birth to female nymphs without the involvement of males. Maturing rapidly, females breed profusely so that the number of these insects multiplies quickly. Winged females may develop later in the season, allowing the insects to colonise new plants. In temperate regions, a phase of sexual reproduction occurs in the autumn, with the insects often overwintering as eggs. The life cycle of some species involves an alternation between two host plants, for example between an annual crop and a woody plant. Some species feed on only one type of plant, while others are generalists, colonising many plant groups
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Psylloidea
Aphalaridae Calophyidae Carsidaridae Homotomidae Phacopteronidae Psyllidae TriozidaePsylloidea is a superfamily of true bugs, including the jumping plant lice and others which have recently been classified as distinct families. References[edit]The World Psylloidea Database by D
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Aphid
Aphids are small sap-sucking insects and members of the superfamily Aphidoidea. Common names include greenfly and blackfly,[a] but the insects can also be brown or pink, and the group includes the fluffy white woolly aphids. A typical life cycle involves flightless females giving living birth to female nymphs without the involvement of males. Maturing rapidly, females breed profusely so that the number of these insects multiplies quickly. Winged females may develop later in the season, allowing the insects to colonise new plants. In temperate regions, a phase of sexual reproduction occurs in the autumn, with the insects often overwintering as eggs. The life cycle of some species involves an alternation between two host plants, for example between an annual crop and a woody plant. Some species feed on only one type of plant, while others are generalists, colonising many plant groups
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Aphidinae
Aphidinae is a bug subfamily in the family Aphididae. Many species of aphids spread potyviruses and most are from the subfamily Aphidinae (genera Macrosiphum
Macrosiphum
and Myzus). References[edit]^ Aphid Species
Species
File
File
Version 5.0 (2014). "Aphidinae". Retrieved September 17, 2014. External links[edit] Wikispecies
Wikispecies
has information related to AphidinaeWikimedia Commons has media related to Aphidinae.Taxon identifiersWd: Q4034183 BugGuide: 347774 EoL: 12032803 Fossilworks: 222951 iNaturalist: 194066 NCBI: 133076This Hemiptera
Hemiptera
article related to members of the insect suborder Sternorrhyncha
Sternorrhyncha
is a stub
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Macrosiphini
See textMacrosiphini is a bug tribe in the subfamily Aphidinae.[1] Genera[edit] Abstrusomyzus - Acaudella - Acaudinum - Acuticauda - Acutosiphon - Acyrthosiphon - Akkaia - Allocotaphis - Alphitoaphis - Amegosiphon - Ammiaphis - Amphicercidus - Amphorophora - Amphorosiphon - Anaulacorthum - Anthracosiphon - Antimacrosiphon - Anuraphis - Anuromyzus - Aphidura - Aphiduromyzus - Aphthargelia - Artemisaphis - Aspidaphis - Aspidophorodon - Atarsos - Aulacophoroides - Aulacorthum - Avicennina - Berberidaphis - Bipersona - Blanchardaphis - Brachycaudus - Brachycolus - Brachycorynella - Brachymyzus - Brachysiphoniella - Brevicoryne - Brevicorynella - Brevisiphonaphis - Burundiaphis - Cachryphora - Capitophorus - Capraphis - Carolinaia - Catamergus - Cavariella - Cedoaphis - Ceruraphis - Chaetomyzus - Chaetosiphon - Chaitaphis - Chakrabartiaphis - Chitinosiphon - Chondrillobium - Chusiphuncula - Clypeoaphis - Codonopsimyzus - Coloradoa - Corylobium - Cryptaphis - Cryptomyzus - Cyrtomophor
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Coleoptera
See subgroups of the order ColeopteraBeetles are a group of insects that form the order Coleoptera, in the superorder Endopterygota. Their front pair of wings is hardened into wing-cases, elytra, distinguishing them from most other insects. The Coleoptera, with about 400,000 species, is the largest of all orders, constituting almost 40% of described insects and 25% of all known animal life-forms; new species are discovered frequently. The largest of all families, the Curculionidae
Curculionidae
(weevils) with some 70,000 member species, belongs to this order. They are found in almost every habitat except the sea and the polar regions. They interact with their ecosystems in several ways: beetles often feed on plants and fungi, break down animal and plant debris, and eat other invertebrates
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Ground Beetles
Anthiinae Apotominae Brachininae Broscinae Carabinae Cicindelinae Ctenodactylinae Dryptinae Elaphrinae Gineminae Harpalinae Hiletinae Lebiinae Licininae Loricerinae Melaeninae Migadopinae Nebriinae Nototylinae Omophroninae Orthogoniinae Panagaeinae Paussinae Platyninae Promecognathinae Protorabinae Pseudomorphinae Psydrinae Pterostichinae Rhysodinae Scaritinae Siagoninae Trechinae Xenaroswellianinae (See text)Ground beetles are a large, cosmopolitan family of beetles,[2] Carabidae, with more than 40,000 species worldwide, around 2,000 of which are found in North America and 2,700 in Europe.[3] It is one of the ten largest animal families, as of 2015.Contents1 Description and ecology1.1 Defensive secretions 1.2 Ecology2 Relationship with humans 3 Evolution and systematics3.1 Subfamilies and selected genera3.1.1 Basal ground beetles 3.1.2 Carabidae Conjunctae4 Notes 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksDescription a
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Clambidae
5Clambidae is a family of beetles. They are known commonly as the minute beetles[1] or the fringe-winged beetles.[2] They are found worldwide on every continent except Antarctica.[1] These are tiny beetles with bodies measuring no more than 2 millimeters in length. They are flattened to convex in shape and some can roll into a ball. Some are hairless, while some are quite hairy or scaly.[3] The margins of the wings are lined with long hairs.[1] Clambids commonly feed on fungi.[3] The family is divided into 5 genera and about 70 described species.[1] The largest and most widespread genus is Clambus, which occurs around the world. The genus Sphaerothorax is found in Australia and New Zealand.[4] Acalyptomerus is circumtropical.[5] Genera:Acalyptomerus Calyptomerus Clambus Loricaster SphaerothoraxReferences[edit]Wikimedia Commons has media related to Clambidae.^ a b c d Majka, C. G., & Langor, D. (2009). Clambidae (Coleoptera) of Atlantic Canada
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Staphylinidae
The rove beetles are a family (Staphylinidae) of beetles,[1] primarily distinguished by their short elytra (wing covers) that typically leave more than half of their abdomens exposed. With roughly 63,000 species in thousands of genera, the group is currently recognized as the largest extant family of beetles. It is an ancient group, with fossilized rove beetles known from the Triassic, 200 million years ago, and possibly even earlier if the genus Leehermania proves to be a member of this family.[2] They are an ecologically and morphologically diverse group of beetles, and commonly encountered in terrestrial ecosystems. One well-known species is the devil's coach horse beetle. For some other species, see list of British rove beetles.Contents1 Anatomy 2 Ecology 3 Systematics 4 References 5 Important works on Staphylinidae 6 Regional works 7 External linksAnatomy[edit] As might be expected for such a large family, considerable variation exists among the species
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Piestinae
Piestinae Erichson 1839 are a subfamily of Staphylinidae.[1]Contents1 Anatomy 2 Ecology 3 Systematics 4 References 5 References 6 External linksAnatomy[edit]body elongate and depressed, abdomen parallel-sided. antennae inserted under shelf-like corners of frons tarsi 5-5-5Piestus extimusSiagonium punctatumSiagonium punctatum, ventral headEcology[edit]Habitat: many species under bark of decaying trees. Collection Method: barking. Biology: some are saprophages or mycophages.Systematics[edit] Piestinae includes three genera and five species in North America. These three genera belong to the subfamily:Hypotelus Erichson, 1839 i c g Piestus Gravenhorst, 1806 i c g b Siagonium Kirby & Spence, 1815 i c g bData sources: i = ITIS,[2] c = Catalogue of Life,[3] g = GBIF,[4] b = Bugguide.net[5] References[edit]Newton, A. F., Jr., M. K. Thayer, J. S. Ashe, and D. S. Chandler. 2001. 22. Staphylinidae Latreille, 1802. p. 272–418. In: R. H. Arnett, Jr., and M. C
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Sphaeritidae
S. dimidiatus S. glabratus S. nitidus S. politusWikispecies has information related to SphaeritesSphaerites is a genus of beetles, the only genus in the family Sphaeritidae, sometimes called the false clown beetles. It is closely related to the clown beetles but with distinct characteristics. There are four known species, widespread in temperate area but not commonly seen. Adults range in length from 4.5–7 mm, with oval bodies, black but with a slight bluish-green sheen. The life histories are poorly known, but they are generally found around decaying matter and fungi. S. glabratus is associated with conifer forests in northern Europe, and seems especially attracted to sap flows from trees, feeding and then mating. References[edit]Alfred F. Newton, "Sphaeritidae", in Ross H. Arnett, Jr. and Michael C. Thomas, American Beetles (CRC Press, 2001), vol
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Typhlocybinae
4-10, see text Typhlocybinae
Typhlocybinae
is a subfamily of insects in the leafhopper family, Cicadellidae. This is currently the second largest leafhopper subfamily based on the number of described species, but researchers believe there are so many taxa yet undescribed that it is probably the largest subfamily.[1] Approximately 6000 species have been described to science so far.[1]Contents1 Tribes 2 Selected genera 3 Gallery 4 ReferencesTribes[edit] Entomologists divide the subfamily into four to ten tribes
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Histeridae
about 330, see text Histeridae
Histeridae
is a family of beetles commonly known as Clown beetles or Hister beetles. This very diverse group of beetles contains 3,900 species found worldwide. They can be easily identified by their shortened elytra that leaves two of the seven tergites exposed, and their elbowed antennae with clubbed ends. These predatory feeders are most active at night and will fake death if they feel threatened. This family of beetles will occupy almost any kind of niche throughout the world. Hister beetles have proved useful during forensic investigations to help in time of death estimation. Also, certain species are used in the control of livestock pests that infest dung and to control houseflies
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