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Royal College Of Physicians
The Royal College of Physicians
Royal College of Physicians
is a British professional body dedicated to improving the practice of medicine, chiefly through the accreditation of physicians by examination. Founded in 1518, it set the first international standard in the classification of diseases, and its library contains medical texts of great historical interest. The college hosts four training faculties: the Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine, the Faculty for Pharmaceutical Medicine, the Faculty of Occupational Medicine and the Faculty of Physician Associates. The college is sometimes referred to as the Royal College of Physicians
Royal College of Physicians
of London
London
to differentiate it from other similarly named bodies
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Society Of Apothecaries
The Worshipful Society of Apothecaries
Apothecaries
of London
London
is one of the livery companies of the City of London. It is one of the largest livery companies (with over 1,600 members in 2012) and ranks 58th in their order of precedence. The society is a member of the London
London
Museums of Health & Medicine and its guild church is the Church of St Andrew-by-the-Wardrobe
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ICD
The International Classification of Diseases (ICD) is the international "standard diagnostic tool for epidemiology, health management and clinical purposes". Its full official name is International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems.[1] The ICD is maintained by the World Health Organization
World Health Organization
(WHO), the directing and coordinating authority for health within the United Nations System.[2] The ICD is designed as a health care classification system, providing a system of diagnostic codes for classifying diseases, including nuanced classifications of a wide variety of signs, symptoms, abnormal findings, complaints, social circumstances, and external causes of injury or disease. This system is designed to map health conditions to corresponding generic categories together with specific variations, assigning for these a designated code, up to six characters long
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Regent's Park
Regent's Park
Regent's Park
(officially The Regent's Park) is one of the Royal Parks of London
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Silver-gilt
Silver-gilt
Silver-gilt
or gilded/gilt silver, sometimes known in American English by the French term vermeil, is silver (either pure or sterling) which has been gilded with gold. Most large objects made in goldsmithing that appear to be gold are actually silver-gilt; for example most sporting trophies (including medals such as the gold medals awarded in all Olympic Games
Olympic Games
after 1912[1]) and many crown jewels are silver-gilt objects
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Great Fire Of London
The Great Fire of London
Great Fire of London
was a major conflagration that swept through the central parts of the English city of London from Sunday, 2 September to Wednesday, 5 September 1666.[1] The fire gutted the medieval City of London
City of London
inside the old Roman city wall. It threatened but did not reach the aristocratic district of Westminster, Charles II's Palace of Whitehall, and most of the suburban slums.[2] It consumed 13,200 houses, 87 parish churches, St Paul's Cathedral, and most of the buildings of the City authorities. It is estimated to have destroyed the homes of 70,000 of the City's 80,000 inhabitants.[3] The death toll is unknown but traditionally thought to have been small, as only six verified deaths were recorded
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Latin
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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David Piper
David Piper
David Piper
(born 2 December 1930)[1] is a British former Formula One and sports car racing driver from England
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World Health Organisation
The World Health Organization
World Health Organization
(WHO; French: Organisation mondiale de la santé) is a specialized agency of the United Nations
United Nations
that is concerned with international public health. It was established on 7 April 1948 headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland. The WHO
WHO
is a member of the United Nations
United Nations
Development Group. Its predecessor, the Health Organization, was an agency of the League of Nations. The constitution of the World Health Organization
World Health Organization
had been signed by 61 countries on 7 April 1948, with the first meeting of the World Health Assembly finishing on 24 July 1948. It incorporated the Office International d'Hygiène Publique and the League of Nations
League of Nations
Health Organization. Since its creation, it has played a leading role in the eradication of smallpox
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Great Fire Of London
The Great Fire of London
Great Fire of London
was a major conflagration that swept through the central parts of the English city of London from Sunday, 2 September to Wednesday, 5 September 1666.[1] The fire gutted the medieval City of London
City of London
inside the old Roman city wall. It threatened but did not reach the aristocratic district of Westminster, Charles II's Palace of Whitehall, and most of the suburban slums.[2] It consumed 13,200 houses, 87 parish churches, St Paul's Cathedral, and most of the buildings of the City authorities. It is estimated to have destroyed the homes of 70,000 of the City's 80,000 inhabitants.[3] The death toll is unknown but traditionally thought to have been small, as only six verified deaths were recorded
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St Paul's Cathedral
St Paul's Cathedral, London, is an Anglican cathedral, the seat of the Bishop
Bishop
of London
London
and the mother church of the Diocese
Diocese
of London. It sits on Ludgate Hill
Ludgate Hill
at the highest point of the City of London
London
and is a Grade I listed building. Its dedication to Paul the Apostle
Paul the Apostle
dates back to the original church on this site, founded in AD 604.[1] The present cathedral, dating from the late 17th century, was designed in the English Baroque
English Baroque
style by Sir Christopher Wren. Its construction, completed in Wren's lifetime, was part of a major rebuilding programme in the City after the Great Fire of London.[2][page needed] The cathedral is one of the most famous and most recognisable sights of London
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Elizabethan
The Elizabethan era
Elizabethan era
is the epoch in the Tudor period
Tudor period
of the history of England
England
during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I (1558–1603). Historians often depict it as the golden age in English history
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John Dee
John Dee
John Dee
(13 July 1527 – 1608 or 1609) was an English mathematician, astronomer, astrologer, occult philosopher,[5] and advisor to Queen Elizabeth
Elizabeth
I. He devoted much of his life to the study of alchemy, divination, and Hermetic philosophy. He was also an advocate of England's imperial expansion into a "British Empire", a term he is generally credited with coining.[6] Dee straddled the worlds of modern science and magic just as the former was emerging. One of the most learned men of his age, he had been invited to lecture on the geometry of Euclid
Euclid
at the University of Paris while still in his early twenties
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National Health Service (England)
The National Health Service
National Health Service
(NHS) is the publicly funded national healthcare system for England
England
and one of the four National Health Services for each constituent country of the United Kingdom. It is the largest single-payer healthcare system in the world. Primarily funded through the general taxation system and overseen by the Department of Health, NHS England
NHS England
provides healthcare to all legal English residents, with most services free at the point of use. Some services, such as emergency treatment and treatment of infectious diseases are free for everyone, including visitors.[1] Free healthcare at the point of use comes from the core principles at the founding of the National Health Service
National Health Service
by the Labour government in 1948
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Cornelis Janssens Van Ceulen
Cornelius Johnson or Cornelis Janssens van Ceulen (Dutch: [kɔrˈneːlɪs ˈjɑnsəns vɑn ˈkøːlən]; also Cornelius Jonson van Ceulen, Cornelis Jansz. van Ceulen and many other variants)[1] (bapt. 14 October 1593 – bur. 5 August 1661) was an English painter of portraits of Dutch or Flemish parentage. He was active in England, from at least 1618 to 1643, when he moved to Middelburg
Middelburg
in the Netherlands
Netherlands
to escape the English Civil War. Between 1646 and 1652 he lived in Amsterdam, before settling in Utrecht, where he died. Johnson painted many portraits of emerging new English gentry. His early portraits were panel paintings with "fictive" oval frames. His works can be found in major collections in the UK and overseas as well as in private collections in stately homes in Britain. He was an accomplished portrait painter, but lacked the flair of a master such as Van Dyck
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Baldwin Hamey Junior
Baldwin Hamey the Younger M.D. (1600–1676) was an English physician, now best known as a medical biographer.Contents1 Life 2 Legacy 3 Works 4 Works 5 Family 6 NotesLife[edit] The eldest son of Baldwin Hamey the Elder, he was born in London 24 April 1600 of Flemish and Dutch parents. He entered the University of Leyden as a student of philosophy in May 1617. He visited Oxford for a time in 1621, and studied in the library there. In August 1625 he went to Hastings to sail to the Netherlands, was detained by the mayor, and avoided shipwreck. He graduated M.D. at Leyden 12 August 1626.[1] Hamey then toured Europe, and was incorporated M.D. at Oxford 4 February 1629. He was admitted a fellow of the College of Physicians of London on 10 January 1633, was eight times censor, from 1640 to 1654, was registrar in 1646 and 1650 to 1654, and treasurer 1664–6. In 1647 he delivered the Gulstonian lectures. He settled in practice in the parish of St. Clement's, Eastcheap
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