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Rowlock
A rowlock[1] UK: /ˈrɒlək/, sometimes spur (due to the similarity in shape and size), oarlock (USA)[2] or gate (Australia) is a brace that attaches an oar to a boat. When a boat is rowed, the rowlock acts as a fulcrum, and, in doing so, the propulsive force that the rower exerts on the water with the oar is transferred to the boat by the thrust force exerted on the rowlock. On ordinary rowing craft, the rowlocks are attached to the gunwales. In the sport of rowing, the rowlocks are attached to outriggers (often just called "riggers"), which project from the boat and provide greater leverage. In sport rowing, the rowlocks are normally U-shaped and attached to a vertical pin which allows the rowlock to pivot around the pin during the rowing stroke
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British English
British English
British English
is the standard dialect of English language
English language
as spoken and written in the United Kingdom.[3] Variations exist in formal, written English in the United Kingdom. For example, the adjective wee is almost exclusively used in parts of Scotland
Scotland
and Ireland, and occasionally Yorkshire, whereas little is predominant elsewhere. Nevertheless, there is a meaningful degree of uniformity in written English within the United Kingdom, and this could be described by the term British English. The forms of spoken English, however, vary considerably more than in most other areas of the world where English is spoken,[4] so a uniform concept of British English
British English
is more difficult to apply to the spoken language
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Rowing
Rowing
Rowing
is the act of propelling a boat using the motion of oars in the water, displacing water, and propelling the boat forward. The difference between paddling and rowing is that rowing requires oars to have a mechanical connection with the boat, while paddles are hand-held and have no mechanical connection. This article deals with the more general types of rowing, such as for recreation and transport rather than the sport of competitive rowing which is a specialized case of racing using strictly regulated equipment and a highly refined technique.[1]Contents1 Types of rowing systems 2 Ancient rowing 3 Venetian Rowing 4 Whitehall rowboats 5 Design factors of rowing boats 6 Oars 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksTypes of rowing systems[edit] In some localities, rear-facing systems prevail. In other localities, forward-facing systems prevail, especially in crowded areas such as in Venice, Italy and in Asian and Indonesian rivers and harbors
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Lever
A lever (/ˈliːvər/ or US: /ˈlɛvər/) is a simple machine consisting of a beam or rigid rod pivoted at a fixed hinge, or fulcrum. A lever is a rigid body capable of rotating on a point on itself. On the basis of the location of fulcrum, load and effort, the lever is divided into three types. It is one of the six simple machines identified by Renaissance scientists. A lever amplifies an input force to provide a greater output force, which is said to provide leverage. The ratio of the output force to the input force is the mechanical advantage of the lever.Contents1 Etymology 2 Early use 3 Force and levers 4 Classes of levers 5 Law of the lever 6 Virtual work
Virtual work
and the law of the lever 7 See also 8 Notes 9 References 10 External linksEtymology[edit] The word "lever" entered English about 1300 from Old French, in which the word was levier. This sprang from the stem of the verb lever, meaning "to raise"
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Gunwale
The gunwale (/ˈɡʌnəl/) is the top edge of the side of a boat.[1] Originally the gunwale was the "gun ridge" on a sailing warship. This represented the strengthening wale or structural band added to the design of the ship, at and above the level of a gun deck. It was designed to accommodate the stresses imposed by the use of artillery. In wooden boats, the gunwale remained, mounted inboard of the sheer strake, regardless of the use of gunnery. In modern boats, it is the top edge of the side where there is usually some form of stiffening. On a canoe, the gunwale is typically the widened edge at the top of the side of the boat, where the edge is reinforced with wood, plastic or aluminum and to which the thwarts are attached. Modern cedar-strip canoes have gunwales which consist of inner and outer parts called "inwales" and "outwales". These two parts of the gunwale give rigidity and strength to the hull
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Rowing (sport)
Rowing, often referred to as crew in the United States,[1] is a sport whose origins reach back to Ancient Egyptian times. It involves propelling a boat (racing shell) on water using oars. By pushing against the water with an oar, a force is generated to move the boat. The sport can be either recreational for enjoyment or fitness, or competitive, when athletes race against each other in boats.[2] There are a number of different boat classes in which athletes compete, ranging from an individual shell (called a single scull) to an eight-person shell with coxswain (called a coxed eight). Modern rowing as a competitive sport can be traced to the early 10th century when races were held between professional watermen on the River Thames
River Thames
in London, United Kingdom. Often prizes were offered by the London
London
Guilds
Guilds
and Livery Companies
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Fosnes
Fosnes
Fosnes
is a municipality in Trøndelag
Trøndelag
county, Norway. It is part of the Namdalen
Namdalen
region. The administrative centre of the municipality is the village of Dun on the island of Jøa. Other villages include Salsnes
Salsnes
and Nufsfjord. The 544-square-kilometre (210 sq mi) municipality is the 199th largest by area out of the 422 municipalities in Norway. Fosnes is the 413th most populous municipality in Norway
Norway
with a population of 628
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Tjøme
Tjøme
Tjøme
(Norwegian pronunciation: [ˈçøːmə]) is an island in Færder, and a former municipality in Vestfold
Vestfold
county, Norway. The administrative centre of the municipality was the village of Tjøme. The parish of Tjømø was established as a municipality on 1 January 1838 (see formannskapsdistrikt). Tjome was the childhood holiday destination for writer Roald Dahl.[citation needed]Contents1 General information1.1 Name 1.2 Coat-of-arms2 Geography 3 References 4 External linksGeneral information[edit] Name[edit] The Old Norse
Old Norse
form of the name was Tjúma. The name of the island is probably very old, and the meaning is unknown. Prior to 1918, the name was spelled "Tjømø".[2] Coat-of-arms[edit] The coat-of-arms is from modern times (1989)
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Oar
An oar is an implement used for water-borne propulsion. Oars have a flat blade at one end. Rowers grasp the oar at the other end. The difference between oars and paddles are that paddles are held by the paddler, and are not connected with the vessel. Oars generally are connected to the vessel by means of rowlocks or tholes which transmit the applied force to the boat. In this system (known as a second class lever)[1] the water is the fulcrum. Rowers generally face the stern of the vessel, reach towards the stern, and insert the blade of their oar in the water. As they lean back, towards the vessel's bow, the blade of their oars sweeps the water towards the stern, providing forward thrust – see lever. For thousands of years vessels were powered either by sails, or the mechanical work of rowers, or paddlers
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Outrigger
An outrigger is a projecting structure on a boat, with specific meaning depending on types of vessel. Outriggers may also refer to legs on a wheeled vehicle which are folded out when it needs stabilization, for example on a crane that lifts heavy loads.Missile vehicle standing on its outriggers to stabilize launchContents1 Powered vessels and sailboats 2 Fishing 3 Rowing 4 See also 5 ReferencesPowered vessels and sailboats[edit] An outrigger describes any contraposing float rigging beyond the side (gunwale /ˈɡʌnəl/) of a boat to improve the vessel's stability. If a single outrigger is used it is usually but not always windward.[1] In an outrigger canoe and in sailboats such as the proa, an outrigger is a thin, long, solid, hull used to stabilise an inherently unstable main hull. The outrigger is positioned rigidly and parallel to the main hull so that the main hull is less likely to capsize
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Radøy
Radøy
Radøy
is an island municipality in the Nordhordland
Nordhordland
district in Hordaland
Hordaland
county, Norway. The municipality includes almost all of the island of Radøy
Radøy
plus many small surrounding islands. The administrative centre of the municipality is the village of Manger. Other villages in the municipality include Askeland, Austmarka, Bøvågen, Haugland, Sæbø, and Sletta. The 111-square-kilometre (43 sq mi) municipality is the 372nd largest by area out of the 422 municipalities in Norway. Radøy is the 199th most populous municipality in Norway
Norway
with a population of 5,128
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Rowlock
A rowlock[1] UK: /ˈrɒlək/, sometimes spur (due to the similarity in shape and size), oarlock (USA)[2] or gate (Australia) is a brace that attaches an oar to a boat. When a boat is rowed, the rowlock acts as a fulcrum, and, in doing so, the propulsive force that the rower exerts on the water with the oar is transferred to the boat by the thrust force exerted on the rowlock. On ordinary rowing craft, the rowlocks are attached to the gunwales. In the sport of rowing, the rowlocks are attached to outriggers (often just called "riggers"), which project from the boat and provide greater leverage. In sport rowing, the rowlocks are normally U-shaped and attached to a vertical pin which allows the rowlock to pivot around the pin during the rowing stroke
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