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Rowley Park Speedway
Rowley Park Speedway [1] is a former dirt track racing venue that was located on Torrens Road in Brompton, South Australia
Brompton, South Australia
and supplanted the Kilburn speedway (1946–1951) and the earlier Camden motordrome (1935–1941). The speedway ran continually during Australia's speedway seasons (usually October to April) from its opening meeting on Wednesday 21 December 1949 until its last meeting on Friday 6 April 1979.Contents1 History 2 Australian championships 3 Track announcers 4 Today 5 Fatalities 6 Famous competitors 7 Track records in 1955–56 8 Track records 1978–79 9 ReferencesHistory[edit] Rowley Park [2] was originally conceived in 1948 by a group of Kilburn Speedway Speedcar drivers who were disgruntled with the Melbourne based promotors Kirjon Speedway Pty Ltd
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Torrens Road, Adelaide
Torrens Road
Road
is an arterial road in the northwestern suburbs of Adelaide, Australia.[1] The road travels in a southeast-northwest direction and is parallel with Port Road
Road
for most of its length. It commences at Park Terrace (A21). Travelling northwest, major roads that intersect Torrens Road
Road
include Churchill Road
Road
(A22), South Road (A13), and Regency Road
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Borderline Speedway
Borderline Speedway, is a dirt track racing venue in the Australian state of South Australia
South Australia
located in the locality of Glenburnie, South Australia about 8 kilometres (5.0 mi) east of the city of Mount Gambier.[1] Racing at the speedway generally takes place between November and May.Contents1 History 2 Track information 3 Lap records3.1 Cars 3.2 Bikes4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Borderline Speedway was opened on 23 February 1957 with stock car racing supported by local motorbike races. The South East Racing Car Club took over the promotion of the speedway in 1961 and six years later production car racing was introduced as were the Super Modifieds (later known as Sprintcars). The speedway received its first safety fence in 1970 and the light towers were replaced with a single light tower on the infield
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Goalkeeper (association Football)
Goalkeeper, often shortened to keeper or goalie, is one of the major positions of association football. It is the most specialised position in the sport. The goalkeeper's primary role is to prevent the opposing team from successfully moving the ball over the defended goal-line (between the posts and under the crossbar). This is accomplished by the goalkeeper moving into the path of the ball and either catching it or directing it away from the vicinity of the goal line. Within the penalty area goalkeepers are able to use their hands, making them (outside throw-ins) the only players on the field permitted to handle the ball. The back pass rule prevents goalkeepers handling direct passes back to them from teammates. Goalkeepers usually perform goal kicks, and also give commands to their defense during corner kicks, direct and indirect free kicks, and marking
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Water Table
The water table is the upper surface of the zone of saturation. The zone of saturation is where the pores and fractures of the ground are saturated with water.[1] The water table is the surface where the water pressure head is equal to the atmospheric pressure (where gauge pressure = 0). It may be visualized as the "surface" of the subsurface materials that are saturated with groundwater in a given vicinity.[2] The groundwater may be from precipitation or from groundwater flowing into the aquifer. In areas with sufficient precipitation, water infiltrates through pore spaces in the soil, passing through the unsaturated zone. At increasing depths, water fills in more of the pore spaces in the soils, until a zone of saturation is reached. Below the water table, in the phreatic zone (zone of saturation), layers of permeable rock that yield groundwater are called aquifers
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Australian Pound
The Australian pound
Australian pound
(symbol £) was the currency of Australia
Australia
from 1910 until 14 February 1966, when it was replaced by the Australian dollar. As with other £sd
£sd
currencies, it was subdivided into 20 shillings (symbol s), each of 12 pence (symbol d).Contents1 History1.1 Earlier Australian currencies 1.2 National currency 1.3 Historic £1 note 1.4 Decimalisation2 Coins 3 Banknotes 4 See also 5 Footnotes 6 References 7 Sources 8 External linksHistory[edit] Earlier Australian currencies[edit] The first European settlement of Australia
Australia
took place on 26 January 1788 at Port Jackson
Port Jackson
(modern Sydney, New South Wales)
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Penny (Australian)
The Australian penny was a coin of the Australian pound used in the Commonwealth of Australia prior to decimalisation in 1966. It was worth one-twelfth of an Australian shilling and 1/240 of an Australian pound. The coin was equivalent in its dimensions, composition and value to the British penny, as the two currencies were fixed at par. The coin was first introduced in 1911, and stopped being minted in 1964, with the introduction of decimalisation. When decimalisation happened on 14 February 1966, the coin value was equal to 0.8333¢. The obverse of the coin featured the reigning Australian monarch. Three were featured: George V, George VI and Elizabeth II. All of the pennies featuring George VI and Elizabeth II had a kangaroo on the reverse
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Sydney
Sydney
Sydney
(/ˈsɪdni/ ( listen))[7] is the state capital of New South Wales
Wales
and the most populous city in Australia
Australia
and Oceania.[8] Located on Australia's east coast, the metropolis surrounds the world's largest natural harbour and sprawls about 70 km (43.5 mi) on its periphery towards the Blue Mountains to the west, Hawkesbury to the north and Macarthur to the south.[9] Sydney
Sydney
is made up of 658 suburbs, 40 local government areas and 15 contiguous regions
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Motorcycle Speedway
Motorcycle
Motorcycle
speedway, usually referred to as speedway, is a motorcycle sport involving four and sometimes up to six riders competing over four anti-clockwise laps of an oval circuit. The motorcycles are specialist machines which use only one gear and have no brakes; racing takes place on a flat oval track usually consisting of dirt, loosely packed shale, or dolomite (mostly used in Australia and New Zealand). Competitors use this surface to slide their machines sideways, powersliding or broadsiding into the bends. On the straight sections of the track the motorcycles reach speeds of up to 70 miles per hour (110 km/h). The exact origins of the sport are unknown but there is evidence of a type of speedway racing being practised in the USA before the First World War and in Australia in the late 1910s and early 1920s
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Dolomite
Dolomite
Dolomite
( /ˈdɒləmaɪt/) is an anhydrous carbonate mineral composed of calcium magnesium carbonate, ideally CaMg(CO3)2. The term is also used for a sedimentary carbonate rock composed mostly of the mineral dolomite. An alternative name sometimes used for the dolomitic rock type is dolostone.Contents1 History 2 Properties 3 Formation 4 Uses 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Most probably the mineral dolomite was first described by Carl Linnaeus in 1768.[6] In 1791, it was described as a rock by the French naturalist and geologist Déodat Gratet de Dolomieu
Déodat Gratet de Dolomieu
(1750–1801), first in buildings of the old city of Rome, and later as samples collected in the mountains now known as the Dolomite Alps
Dolomite Alps
of northern Italy
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Catch Fence
The following is a glossary of terminology used in motorsport, along with explanations of their meanings.ContentsA B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y ZReferences External links0–9[edit]107% rule Often used in Formula One
Formula One
or other racing series, it is a time which the driver must qualify the car within 107% of the polesitter's time to be allowed to compete. Variations of this may be used to monitor drivers and warn them to make the required threshold of speed or be parked (disqualified)
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Mount Gambier
Mount Gambier is the second most populated city in South Australia with an estimated urban population of 28,684.[1] The city is located on the slopes of Mount Gambier (volcano)
Mount Gambier (volcano)
in the south east of the state, about 450 kilometres (280 mi) south-east of the capital Adelaide
Adelaide
and just 17 kilometres (11 mi) from the Victorian border, it is the most important settlement in the Limestone Coast region and the seat of government for both the City of Mount Gambier and the District Council of Grant. The peak of the dormant volcano was the first place in South Australia named by European explorers. It was sighted in 1800 by Lieutenant James Grant from the survey brig, HMS Lady Nelson, and named for Lord James Gambier, Admiral of the Fleet
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Kalgoorlie
Kalgoorlie, part of the City of Kalgoorlie-Boulder, is a city in the Goldfields-Esperance
Goldfields-Esperance
region of Western Australia, located 595 km (370 mi) east-northeast of Perth
Perth
at the end of the Great Eastern Highway. The town was founded in 1893 during the Coolgardie gold rush, and is located close to the so-called "Golden Mile"
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Sydney Showground Speedway
A showground is a places where events occur, including agricultural shows, and associated facilities
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Brisbane Exhibition Ground
Brisbane
Brisbane
Showgrounds (formerly known as the Brisbane
Brisbane
Exhibition Ground) is located at 600 Gregory Terrace, Bowen Hills, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia and was established in 1875. It hosts almost 300 events each year, with the largest being the Royal Queensland
Queensland
Show (Ekka). The Brisbane
Brisbane
Showgrounds was designed by Claude William Chambers and built by Walls & Juster. It is also referred to as the RNA Showgrounds, Ekka
Ekka
Grounds, National Agricultural and Industrial Association of Queensland
Queensland
Exhibition Grounds, Royal National Agricultural and Industrial Association of Queensland
Queensland
Exhibition Grounds/Show Grounds, and Royal Queensland
Queensland
Showgrounds
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Perth
Perth
Perth
(/ˈpɜːrθ/ ( listen)) is the capital and largest city of the Australian state of Western Australia. It is the fourth-most populous city in Australia, with a population of 2,022,044 living in Greater Perth.[1] Perth
Perth
is part of the South West Land Division of Western Australia, with the majority of the metropolitan area located on the Swan Coastal Plain, a narrow strip between the Indian Ocean and the Darling Scarp. The first areas settled were on the Swan River at Guildford, with the city's central business district and port (Fremantle) both later founded downriver. Perth
Perth
was founded by Captain James Stirling in 1829 as the administrative centre of the Swan River Colony
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