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Rottenführer
Rottenführer
Rottenführer
([ˈʀɔtn̩.fyːʀɐ], "section leader") was a Nazi Party paramilitary rank that was first created in the year 1932. The rank of Rottenführer
Rottenführer
was used by several Nazi paramilitary groups, among them the Sturmabteilung
Sturmabteilung
(SA), the Schutzstaffel
Schutzstaffel
(SS) and was senior to the paramilitary rank of Sturmmann.[1] The insignia for Rottenführer
Rottenführer
consisted of two double silver stripes on a bare collar patch.[2] On field grey SS uniforms, the sleeve chevrons of an Obergefreiter (senior lance-corporal) were also worn.Contents1 Creation 2 Uses 3 Insignia 4 See also 5 Notes 6 BibliographyCreation[edit] Rottenführer
Rottenführer
was first established in 1932 as an SA rank due to an expansion of the organisation requiring a greater number of enlisted positions
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Nazi Party
Hitler
Hitler
YouthDeutsches Jungvolk League of German GirlsParamilitary wings Sturmabteilung SchutzstaffelSports body National Socialist League
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Waffen-SS
The Waffen-SS
Waffen-SS
(German pronunciation: [ˈvafən.ɛs.ɛs], Armed SS) was the armed wing of the Nazi Party's SS organisation
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Zugführer (military)
Zugführer is a military appointment to a sub-subunit leader, e.g. platoon leader, belonging to the Non-commissioned officer (NCO) rank group or junior officer. A Zugführer leads or commands normally a subunit that is called in German language Zug (en: platoon, platoon-size unit, or detachment).Contents1 Germany1.1 Nazi Germany2 Switzerland 3 Austria 4 ReferencesGermany[edit] Zugführer (ZgFhr) of the Bundeswehr
Bundeswehr
is an appointment. The Zugführer is a subunit leader and commands a Zug (in the following platoon) that – depending on the service, branch, or branch of service – normally contains 30 to 60 service members or soldiers. The Bundeswehr platoon consists of some groups; some platoons build a company (infantry), battery (artillery), or squadron (Air Force). To the appointment of Zugführer might be assigned normally an officer (2nd lieutenant of 1st lieutenant to the I. and II
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SS-Stabsscharführer
SS-Stabsscharführer was a non-commissioned officer title which was used by the Waffen-SS
Waffen-SS
between the years of 1938 to 1945. SS-Stabsscharführer was not an actual SS rank, but rather a positional title held by the senior SS-NCO of a company, battalion, or regiment. Typically, those holding the position of Stabsscharführer ranked SS- Oberscharführer
Oberscharführer
(OR-6) or SS- Hauptscharführer
Hauptscharführer
(OR-7) above. Translated as "staff squad leader", the position of SS-Stabsscharführer was denoted by a special sleeve chevron, worn on the upper right shoulder of the field grey SS uniform. Those holding the function of SS-Stabsscharführer had to be addressed Stabsscharführer regardless of the actual rank title Hauptscharführer, Oberscharführe, etc
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Unteroffizier
Unteroffizier is a military rank of the Bundeswehr
Bundeswehr
and of former German-speaking armed forces (Heer and Luftwaffe). The equivalent in anglophone armed forces is sergeant or staff sergeant
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Gefreiter
Gefreiter
Gefreiter
(abbr. Gefr. [ German > "Exempted"]) is a German, Swiss and Austrian military rank that has existed since the 16th century. It is usually the second rank or grade to which an enlisted soldier, airman or sailor could be promoted.[1][2] Within the combined NATO rank scale, the modern-day rank of Gefreiter is usually equivalent to the NATO-standard rank scale OR-2
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Sleeve
A sleeve (O. Eng. slieve, or slyf, a word allied to slip, cf. Dutch sloof) is the part of a garment that covers the arm, or through which the arm passes or slips. The pattern of the sleeve is one of the characteristics of fashion in dress, varying in every country and period. Various survivals of the early forms of sleeve are still found in the different types of academic or other robes. Where the long hanging sleeve is worn it has, as still in China
China
and Japan, been used as a pocket, whence has come the phrase to have up one's sleeve, to have something concealed ready to produce. There are many other proverbial and metaphorical expressions associated with the sleeve, such as to wear one's heart upon one's sleeve, and to laugh in one's sleeve. Sleeve
Sleeve
length varies from barely over the shoulder (cap sleeve) to floor-length
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Sturmabteilung
The Sturmabteilung
Sturmabteilung
(SA; German pronunciation: [ˈʃtʊɐ̯mʔapˌtaɪlʊŋ] ( listen)), literally Storm Detachment, functioned as the original paramilitary wing of the Nazi Party (NSDAP). It played a significant role in Adolf Hitler's rise to power in the 1920s and 1930s
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Feldgrau
Feldgrau
Feldgrau
(field-grey) has been the official basic color of military uniforms of the German armed forces from the early 20th century until 1945 or 1989 respectively. However, according to the color code there was no exact scientific definition, so slightly different grey tinctures were possible. Armed forces of other countries selected slight variations or shades of that color according to the German Feldgrau
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Shoulder Strap
A shoulder strap is a strap over a shoulder. They are often affixed to women's dresses to support its weight or as part of its style. The term is also applied to carrying bags.Contents1 Dress
Dress
shoulder strap 2 Military shoulder strap 3 Carrier shoulder strap 4 See also 5 Notes and references Dress
Dress
shoulder strap[edit]CamisoleA typical pre-prom gathering, with various shoulder strap stylesBridesmaid dress with spaghetti straps Monica Bellucci
Monica Bellucci
wearing a sheath dressA woman wearing a halter topA model in an off-shoulder single strap dress Dress
Dress
shoulder straps are a length of fabric, usually in pairs, used to support clothing, especially women's clothing, such as a dress, camisole, apron or brassiere
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Hitler Youth
The Hitler Youth
Hitler Youth
(German:  Hitlerjugend (help·info), often abbreviated as HJ in German) was the youth organisation of the Nazi Party in Germany. Its origins dated back to 1922 and it received the name Hitler-Jugend, Bund deutscher Arbeiterjugend ("Hitler Youth, League of German Worker Youth") in July 1926. From 1933 until 1945, it was the sole official youth organisation in Germany
Germany
and was partially a paramilitary organisation; it was composed of the Hitler Youth proper for male youths aged 14 to 18, the German Youngsters in the Hitler Youth
Hitler Youth
( Deutsches Jungvolk
Deutsches Jungvolk
in der Hitler Jugend or "DJ", also "DJV") for younger boys aged 10 to 14, and the League of German Girls (Bund Deutsche Mädel or "BDM"). With the surrender of Nazi Germany
Nazi Germany
in 1945, the organisation de facto ceased to exist
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Non-commissioned Officer
A non-commissioned officer or noncommissioned officer (NCO, colloquially non-com or noncom) is a military officer who has not earned a commission.[1][2][3] Such is also called sub-officer in some countries. Non-commissioned officers, in the English-speaking world, usually obtain their position of authority by promotion through the enlisted ranks.[4] In contrast, commissioned officers hold higher ranks than NCOs, have more legal responsibilities, are paid more, and often have more non-military training such as a university diploma. Commissioned officers
Commissioned officers
usually earn their commissions without having risen through the enlisted ranks
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Wehrmacht
The Wehrmacht (German pronunciation: [ˈveːɐ̯maxt] ( listen), lit. "defence force")[N 2] were the unified armed forces of Nazi Germany
Nazi Germany
from 1935 to 1946. It consisted of the Heer (army), the Kriegsmarine
Kriegsmarine
(navy) and the Luftwaffe
Luftwaffe
(air force).[4] The designation Wehrmacht
Wehrmacht
replaced the previously used term Reichswehr, and was the manifestation of Nazi Germany's efforts to rearm the nation to a greater extent than the Treaty of Versailles
Treaty of Versailles
permitted.[5] After the Nazi seizure of power
Nazi seizure of power
in 1933, one of Adolf Hitler's most overt and audacious moves was to establish the Wehrmacht, a modern armed force fully capable of offensive use
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