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Rosmersholm
Rosmersholm
Rosmersholm
(pronounced [ˈrɔsmersˌhɔlm]) is a play written in 1886 by Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen. In the estimation of many critics the piece is Ibsen's masterwork, only equalled by The Wild Duck of 1884.[1] As expressed by the protagonist, Rosmer, the theme of the play is social and political change, in which the traditional ruling classes relinquish their right to impose their ideals on the rest of society,[2] but the action is entirely personal, resting on the conduct of the immoral, or amoral, "free thinking" heroine, Rebecca, who sets herself to undermine Rosmer's religious and political beliefs because of his influential position in the community. Rebecca has abandoned not only Christianity
Christianity
but, unlike Rosmer, she has abandoned the whole ethical system of Christianity
Christianity
as well
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Whittaker Chambers
Jay Vivian Chambers (April 1, 1901 – July 9, 1961), known as Whittaker Chambers, was an American editor who denounced his Communist spying and became respected by the American Conservative movement during the 1950s. After early years as a Communist Party member (1925) and Soviet spy (1932–1938), he defected from communism (underground and open party) and worked at Time magazine
Time magazine
(1939–1948). Under subpoena in 1948, he testified in what became Alger Hiss's perjury (espionage) trials (1949–1950) and he became an outspoken anti-communist (all described in his 1952 memoir Witness).[1] Afterwards, he worked briefly as a senior editor at National Review
National Review
(1957–1959)
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Internet Broadway Database
The Internet Broadway Database
Database
(IBDB) is an online database of Broadway theatre
Broadway theatre
productions and their personnel. It was conceived and created by Karen Hauser in 1996 and is operated by the Research Department of The Broadway League, a trade association for the North American commercial theatre community.[2] The website also has a corresponding app for both the IOS and Android.[3][4][5] This comprehensive history of Broadway provides records of productions from the beginnings of New York theatre in the 18th century up to today. Details include cast and creative lists for opening night and current day, song lists, awards and other interesting facts about every Broadway production
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Project Gutenberg
Project Gutenberg
Project Gutenberg
(PG) is a volunteer effort to digitize and archive cultural works, to "encourage the creation and distribution of eBooks".[2] It was founded in 1971 by Michael S. Hart
Michael S. Hart
and is the oldest digital library.[3] Most of the items in its collection are the full texts of public domain books. The project tries to make these as free as possible, in long-lasting, open formats that can be used on almost any computer. As of 23 March 2018[update], Project Gutenberg reached 56,750 items in its collection of free eBooks.[4] The releases are available in plain text but, wherever possible, other formats are included, such as HTML, PDF, EPUB, MOBI, and Plucker. Most releases are in the English language, but many non-English works are also available. There are multiple affiliated projects that are providing additional content, including regional and language-specific works
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Danish Language
Danish /ˈdeɪnɪʃ/ ( listen) (dansk pronounced [ˈdanˀsɡ] ( listen); dansk sprog, [ˈdanˀsɡ ˈsbʁɔwˀ]) is a North Germanic language spoken by around six million people, principally in Denmark
Denmark
and in the region of Southern Schleswig
Southern Schleswig
in northern Germany, where it has minority language status.[3] Also, minor Danish-speaking communities are found in Norway, Sweden, Spain, the United States, Canada, Brazil, and Argentina. Due to immigration and language shift in urban areas, around 15–20% of the population of Greenland
Greenland
speak Danish as their home language. Along with the other North Germanic languages, Danish is a descendant of Old Norse, the common language of the Germanic peoples
Germanic peoples
who lived in Scandinavia
Scandinavia
during the Viking Era
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Leo Löwenthal
Leo Löwenthal (3 November 1900 – 21 January 1993) was a German sociologist usually associated with the Frankfurt School.Contents1 Life 2 Influence 3 Works 4 References 5 External linksLife[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (May 2015) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)Born in Frankfurt as the son of assimilated Jews (his father was a physician), Löwenthal came of age during the turbulent early years of the Weimar Republic. He joined the newly founded Institute for Social Research in 1926 and quickly became its leading expert on the sociology of literature and mass culture as well as the managing editor of the journal it launched in 1932, the Zeitschrift für Sozialforschung
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Joseph Krutch
Joseph Wood Krutch (/kruːtʃ/;[1] November 25, 1893 – May 22, 1970) was an American writer, critic, and naturalist, best known for his nature books on the American Southwest and as a critic of reductionistic science.[further explanation needed]Contents1 Biography 2 Death 3 Legacy 4 Selected works 5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit] Born in Knoxville, Tennessee, he was educated at the University of Tennessee and received a Ph.D. in English literature from Columbia University. After serving in the army in 1918, he traveled in Europe for a year with friend Mark Van Doren. After the war, he taught English composition at Brooklyn Polytechnic.[2]:118 In 1924, Krutch became theater critic for The Nation, a position he held until 1952.[2]:131 As an author, Krutch first achieved prominence when he published The Modern Temper in 1929
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The Sunday Times
The Sunday Times
The Sunday Times
is the largest-selling British national newspaper in the "quality press" market category. It is published by Times Newspapers Ltd, a subsidiary of News UK, which is in turn owned by News Corp. Times Newspapers also publishes The Times. The two papers were founded independently and have been under common ownership only since 1966. They were bought by News International in 1981. The Sunday Times
The Sunday Times
occupies a dominant position in the quality Sunday market; its circulation of just under one million equals that of its main rivals, The Sunday Telegraph and The Observer, combined.[5] While some other national newspapers moved to a tabloid format in the early 2000s, The Sunday Times
The Sunday Times
has retained the larger broadsheet format and has said that it will continue to do so
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James Agate
James Evershed Agate (9 September 1877 – 6 June 1947) was an English diarist and an influential theatre critic between the two world wars. He took up journalism in his late twenties, on the staff of The Manchester Guardian (1907–14), became a drama critic for The Saturday Review (1921–23) and The Sunday Times (1923–47). He also reviewed drama for the BBC
BBC
(1925–32). The nine volumes of Agate's diaries and letters cover the British theatre of his time and his non-theatrical interests, including sports, social gossip and private preoccupations with health and precarious finances
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Merman
Mermen are mythical male equivalents and counterparts of mermaids – legendary creatures who have the form of a male human from the waist up and are fish-like from the waist down, having scaly fish tails in place of legs. A "merboy" is a young merman. In contrast to mermaids, mermen were traditionally depicted as unattractive.[1][2] However, some modern depictions show them as handsome.Contents1 Mythology 2 Notable mermen 3 Cryptozoology 4 Literature and popular culture 5 See also 6 ReferencesMythology[edit] Mermaid
Mermaid
and merman, 1866. Unknown Russian folk artistIn Greek mythology, mermen were often illustrated to have green seaweed-like hair, a beard, and a trident
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Tragedy
Tragedy
Tragedy
(from the Greek: τραγῳδία, tragōidia[a]) is a form of drama based on human suffering that invokes an accompanying catharsis or pleasure in audiences.[2][3] While many cultures have developed forms that provoke this paradoxical response, the term tragedy often refers to a specific tradition of drama that has played a unique and important role historically in the self-definition of Western civilisation.[2][4] That tradition has been multiple and discontinuous, yet the term has often been used to invoke a powerful effect of cultural identity and historical continuity—"the Greeks and the Elizabethans, in one cultural form; Hel
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Mill Race
A mill race, millrace or millrun[1] is the current of water that turns a water wheel, or the channel (sluice) conducting water to or from a water wheel. Compared to the broad waters of a mill pond, the narrow current is swift and powerful. The race leading to the water wheel on a wide stream or mill pond is called the head race (or headrace[2]), and the race leading away from the wheel is called the tail race[3] (or tailrace[2]). A mill race has many geographically specific names, such as leat,[4] lade, flume, goit, penstock. These words all have more precise definitions and meanings will differ elsewhere
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Lessing Theater
The Lessing Theater
Lessing Theater
was a theatre in the Mitte district of Berlin, Germany. It opened in 1888 and was destroyed in April 1945 in a bombing raid; its ruins were demolished after World War II. The construction of the theatre, for around 900,000 Mark, was especially notable since it was the first new theatre built in Berlin since the construction of the Wallner Theater in 1864; in between only renovations of old theatres and existing spaces had taken place. By order of director Oscar Blumenthal, the building, designed in a Renaissance Revival style by the architects Hermann von der Hude
Hermann von der Hude
and Julius Hennicke, was constructed in less than a year, between October 1887 and September 1888
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BBC Radio 3
HTTP StreamsWorldwide stream (Shoutcast, 128 Kbps MP3) UK-only stream (Shoutcast, 320 Kbps AAC)HLS StreamsWorldwide stream (48 Kbps AAC+) Worldwide stream (96 Kbps AAC+) UK-only stream (128 Kbps AAC) UK-only stream (320 Kbps AAC)MPEG DASH StreamsWorldwide stream (48 Kbps AAC+) UK-only stream (128 Kbps AAC)Website BBC
BBC
Radio 3 BBC
BBC
Radio 3 is a British radio station operated by the BBC. Its output centres on classical music and opera, but jazz, world music, drama, culture and the arts also feature.[1] The station is the world's most significant commissioner of new music,[2][3] and through its New Generation Artists scheme promotes young musicians of all nationalities.[4] The station broadcasts the BBC
BBC
Proms concerts, live and in full, each summer in addition to performances by the BBC Orchestras and Singers
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