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Rose Rosengard Subotnik
Rose Rosengard Subotnik (née Rosengard) is a leading American musicologist, generally credited with introducing the writing of Theodor Adorno
Theodor Adorno
to English-speaking musicologists in the late 1970s.Contents1 Early life 2 Personal life 3 Professional Life 4 Books 5 Selected Additional Writings 6 See also 7 ReferencesEarly life[edit] Subotnik was born in 1942 to Bruna Hazan (1909-2004) and David E. Rosengard (1910-1988) in Boston. David E. Rosengard was a math teacher who would later become the assistant superintendent of the Boston public schools.[1] Subotnik graduated first in her class from Girls Latin High School (1959) and then first in her class at Wellesley College(BA 1963). Upon graduation, she entered a PhD program in musicology at Columbia University
Columbia University
(MA 1965, PhD 1973), under her advisor Edward Lippman
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Brown University
Brown University
Brown University
is a private Ivy League
Ivy League
research university in Providence, Rhode Island, United States. Founded in 1764 as the College in the English Colony of Rhode Island
Rhode Island
and Providence Plantations, it is the seventh-oldest institution of higher education in the U.S. and one of the nine colonial colleges chartered before the American Revolution.[7] At its foundation, Brown was the first college in the U.S. to accept students regardless of their religious affiliation.[8] Its engineering program, the first in the Ivy League, was established in 1847. It was one of the early doctoral-granting U.S. institutions in the late 19th century, adding masters and doctoral studies in 1887.[9] Its New Curriculum is sometimes referred to in education theory as the Brown Curriculum and was adopted by faculty vote in 1969 after a period of student lobbying
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International Standard Name Identifier
The International Standard Name Identifier (ISNI) is an identifier for uniquely identifying the public identities of contributors to media content such as books, television programmes, and newspaper articles. Such an identifier consists of 16 digits. It can optionally be displayed as divided into four blocks. It was developed under the auspices of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) as Draft International Standard 27729; the valid standard was published on 15 March 2012
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Boston
Boston
Boston
(/ˈbɒstən/ ( listen) BOS-tən) is the capital city and most populous municipality[9] of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in the United States
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Wellesley College
Coordinates: 42°17′43″N 71°18′24″W / 42.29528°N 71.30667°W / 42.29528; -71.30667Wellesley CollegeLatin: Collegium WellesleianumFormer namesWellesley Female SeminaryMotto Non Ministrari sed Ministrare (Latin)Motto in EnglishNot to be ministered unto, but to ministerType Private liberal arts college Women's collegeEstablished 1870 (chartered) 1875 (commenced classes)Endowment $1.97 billion (2017)[1]President Paula A
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Columbia University
Columbia University
Columbia University
(Columbia; officially Columbia University
Columbia University
in the City of New York), established in 1754, is a private Ivy League research university in Upper Manhattan, New York City. Columbia contains the oldest college in the state of New York and is the fifth chartered institution of higher learning in the United States, making it one of nine colonial colleges founded prior to the Declaration of Independence.[9] It was established as King's College by royal charter of George II of Great Britain
George II of Great Britain
and renamed Columbia College in 1784 following the American Revolutionary War. The college has produced numerous distinguished alumni
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Touro Law Center
Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center,[2] commonly known as Touro Law Center,[3] is an ABA accredited law school.[4] It is located on Long Island, New York, in the hamlet of Central Islip. The Law Center is part of Touro College and University System, a private, not-for-profit, coeducational institution based in New York City.[5] Touro Law Center has approximately 50 faculty members and 20 teaching adjunct faculty.[1][6] According to Law School Transparency and the required ABA disclosure, 50.3% of applicants were admitted to the school in 2016
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University Of Chicago
The University
University
of Chicago
Chicago
(UChi, U of C, Chicago, or UChicago) is a private research university in Chicago, Illinois. It holds top-ten positions in various national and international rankings.[9][10][11][12] The university is composed of the College, various graduate programs and interdisciplinary committees organized into five academic research divisions and seven professional schools. Beyond the arts and sciences, Chicago
Chicago
is also well known for its professional schools, which include the Pritzker School of Medicine, the Booth School of Business, the Law School, the School of Social Service Administration, the Harris School of Public Policy Studies, the Divinity School and the Graham School of Continuing Liberal and Professional Studies
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American Council Of Learned Societies
The American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS), founded in 1919, is a private, nonprofit federation of 75 scholarly organizations in the humanities and related social sciences.[1] It is best known for its fellowship competitions which provide a range of opportunities for scholars in the humanities and related social sciences at all career stages, from graduate students to distinguished professors to independent scholars, working with a number of disciplines and methodologies in the U.S. and abroad.Contents1 Background1.1 Advancing scholarship in the humanities 1.2 Relationships among learned societies 1.3 New research methods and subjects 1.4 Humanities scholarship 1.5 Structure and governance 1.6 Archives2 Awards 3 Member societies 4 Affiliates 5 References 6 External linksBackground[edit] The federation was created in 1919 to represent the United States in the Union Académique Internationale (International Union of Academies)
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John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation
The John Simon Guggenheim
Simon Guggenheim
Memorial Foundation was founded in 1925[1] by Olga and Simon Guggenheim
Simon Guggenheim
in memory of their son, who died on April 26, 1922. The organization awards Guggenheim Fellowships to professionals who have demonstrated exceptional ability by publishing a significant body of work in the fields of natural sciences, social sciences, humanities, and the creative arts, excluding the performing arts.[1] The roll of Fellows includes numerous Nobel Laureates, Pulitzer and other prize winners. Details[edit] Fellowships are intended to provide gifted and skilled people the opportunity to work with as much creative freedom as possible. They are not available to support training or immediate postgraduate work. Fellowships last for between six and twelve months (occasionally longer). The average award amount in 2003 was US$36,000 to 221 fellows. The Foundation supports only individuals
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Theodor Adorno
Theodor W. Adorno
Theodor W. Adorno
(/əˈdɔːrnoʊ/;[7] German: [aˈdɔʀno]; born Theodor Ludwig Wiesengrund; September 11, 1903 – August 6, 1969) was a German philosopher, sociologist, and composer known for his critical theory of society. He was a leading member of the Frankfurt School
Frankfurt School
of critical theory, whose work has come to be associated with thinkers such as Ernst Bloch, Walter Benjamin, Max Horkheimer, and Herbert Marcuse, for whom the works of Freud, Marx, and Hegel
Hegel
were essential to a critique of modern society. He is widely regarded as one of the 20th century's foremost thinkers on aesthetics and philosophy, as well as one of its preeminent essayists
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Système Universitaire De Documentation
The système universitaire de documentation or SUDOC is a system used by the libraries of French universities and higher education establishments to identify, track and manage the documents in their possession. The catalog, which contains more than 10 million references, allows students and researcher to search for bibliographical and location information in over 3,400 documentation centers. It is maintained by the Bibliographic Agency for Higher Education (fr) (ABES). External links[edit]Official websiteThis article relating to library science or information science is a stub
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
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The New Grove Dictionary Of Music And Musicians
The New Grove Dictionary of Music
Music
and Musicians is an encyclopedic dictionary of music and musicians. Along with the German-language Musik in Geschichte und Gegenwart, it is one of the largest reference works on western music. Originally published under the title A Dictionary of Music
Music
and Musicians, and later as Grove's Dictionary of Music
Music
and Musicians, it has gone through several editions since the 19th century and is widely used
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Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
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