HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Romantics
Romanticism
Romanticism
(also known as the Romantic era) was an artistic, literary, musical and intellectual movement that originated in Europe toward the end of the 18th century, and in most areas was at its peak in the approximate period from 1800 to 1850. Romanticism
Romanticism
was characterized by its emphasis on emotion and individualism as well as glorification of all the past and nature, preferring the medieval rather than the classical
[...More...]

"Romantics" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Romance (other)
Romance
Romance
(from Vulgar Latin rōmānicē "in the Roman language", i.e., "Latin") may refer to: Romance
Romance
(love), love based on emotional attachment as portrayed as ideal in chi
[...More...]

"Romance (other)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

The Little Girl Found
The Little Girl Found
The Little Girl Found
is a poem written by the English poet William Blake. It was published as part of his collection Songs of Experience in 1794. In the poem, the parents of a seven-year-old girl, called Lyca, are looking desperately for their young daughter who is lost in the desert
[...More...]

"The Little Girl Found" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Urban Sprawl
Urban sprawl
Urban sprawl
or suburban sprawl describes the expansion of human populations away from central urban areas into low-density, monofunctional and usually car-dependent communities, in a process called suburbanization. In addition to describing a particular form of urbanization, the term also relates to the social and environmental consequences associated with this development. In Continental Europe the term "peri-urbanisation" is often used to denote similar dynamics and phenomena, although the term urban sprawl is currently being used by the European Environment Agency. There is widespread disagreement about what constitutes sprawl and how to quantify it. For example, some commentators measure sprawl only with the average number of residential units per acre in a given area
[...More...]

"Urban Sprawl" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sturm Und Drang
Sturm und Drang
Sturm und Drang
(German pronunciation: [ˈʃtʊɐ̯m ʊnt ˈdʁaŋ], literally "storm and drive", "storm and urge", though conventionally translated as "storm and stress")[1] was a proto-Romantic movement in German literature
German literature
and music that occurred between the late 1760s and the early 1780s. Within the movement, individual subjectivity and, in particular, extremes of emotion were given free expression in reaction to the perceived constraints of rationalism imposed by the Enlightenment and associated aesthetic movements. The period is named for Friedrich Maximilian Klinger's play of the same name, which was first performed by Abel Seyler's famed theatrical company in 1777. The philosopher Johann Georg Hamann
Johann Georg Hamann
is considered to be the ideologue of Sturm und Drang, with Jakob Michael Reinhold Lenz, H. L
[...More...]

"Sturm Und Drang" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

French Revolution
The French Revolution
Revolution
(French: Révolution française [ʁevɔlysjɔ̃ fʁɑ̃sɛːz]) was a period of far-reaching social and political upheaval in France
France
and its colonies that lasted from 1789 until 1799. It was partially carried forward by Napoleon
Napoleon
during the later expansion of the French Empire. The Revolution
Revolution
overthrew the monarchy, established a republic, catalyzed violent periods of political turmoil, and finally culminated in a dictatorship under Napoleon
Napoleon
who brought many of its principles to areas he conquered in Western Europe and beyond
[...More...]

"French Revolution" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Zeitgeist
The Zeitgeist (/ˈzaɪtɡaɪst/;[1]) is a concept from 18th to 19th-century German philosophy, translated as "spirit of the age" or "spirit of the times". It refers to an invisible agent or force dominating the characteristics of a given epoch in world history. The term is now mostly associated with Hegel, contrasting with Hegel's use of Volksgeist
Volksgeist
"national spirit" and Weltgeist
Weltgeist
"world-spirit", but its coinage and popularization precedes Hegel, and is mostly due to Herder and Goethe.[2] Other philosophers who were associated with such ideas include Spencer[year needed] and Voltaire[year needed].[3] The term as used contemporarily may more pragmatically refer to a fashion or fad which prescribes what is acceptable or tasteful, e.g
[...More...]

"Zeitgeist" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Realism (art Movement)
Realism was an artistic movement that began in France in the 1850s, after the 1848 Revolution.[1] Realists rejected Romanticism, which had dominated French literature and art since the late 18th century. Realism revolted against the exotic subject matter and exaggerated emotionalism and drama of the Romantic movement. Instead, it sought to portray real and typical contemporary people and situations with truth and accuracy, and not avoiding unpleasant or sordid aspects of life. Realist works depicted people of all classes in situations that arise in ordinary life, and often reflected the changes brought by the Industrial and Commercial Revolutions
[...More...]

"Realism (art Movement)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

William Wordsworth
William Wordsworth
William Wordsworth
(7 April 1770 – 23 April 1850) was a major English Romantic poet who, with Samuel Taylor Coleridge, helped to launch the Romantic Age in English literature
English literature
with their joint publication Lyrical Ballads
Lyrical Ballads
(1798). Wordsworth's magnum opus is generally considered to be The Prelude, a semi-autobiographical poem of his early years that he revised and expanded a number of times
[...More...]

"William Wordsworth" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Samuel Taylor Coleridge
(/ˈkoʊləˌrɪdʒ/; 21 October 1772 – 25 July 1834) was an English poet, literary critic, philosopher and theologian who, with his friend William Wordsworth, was a founder of the Romantic Movement in England and a member of the Lake Poets. He wrote the poems The Rime of the Ancient Mariner
The Rime of the Ancient Mariner
and Kubla Khan, as well as the major prose work Biographia Literaria. His critical work, especially on William Shakespeare, was highly influential, and he helped introduce German idealist philosophy to English-speaking culture. Coleridge coined many familiar words and phrases, including suspension of disbelief
[...More...]

"Samuel Taylor Coleridge" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Originality
Originality is the aspect of created or invented works as being new or novel, and thus distinguishable from reproductions, clones, forgeries, or derivative works.[citation needed] An original work is one not received from others nor one copied from or based upon the work of others.[citation needed]. It is a work created with a unique style and substance. The term "originality" is often applied as a compliment to the creativity of artists, writers, and thinkers.[citation needed] The idea of originality as we[who?] know it was invented by Romanticism,[1] with a notion that is often called romantic originality.[2][3][4] The concept of originality is culturally contingent
[...More...]

"Originality" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Songs Of Innocence And Experience
Songs of Innocence
Innocence
and of Experience[1] is an illustrated collection of poems by William Blake. It appeared in two phases. A few first copies were printed and illuminated by William Blake
William Blake
himself in 1789; five years later he bound these poems with a set of new poems in a volume titled Songs of Innocence
Innocence
and of Experience Shewing the Two Contrary States of the Human Soul
[...More...]

"Songs Of Innocence And Experience" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rationalism
In philosophy, rationalism is the epistemological view that "regards reason as the chief source and test of knowledge"[3] or "any view appealing to reason as a source of knowledge or justification".[4] More formally, rationalism is defined as a methodology or a theory "in which the criterion of the truth is not sensory but intellectual and deductive".[5] In an old controversy, rationalism was opposed to empiricism, where the rationalists believed that reality has an intrinsically logical structure. Because of this, the rationalists argued that certain truths exist and that the intellect can directly grasp these truths. That is to say, rationalists asserted that certain rational principles exist in logic, mathematics, ethics, and metaphysics that are so fundamentally true that denying them causes one to fall into contradiction
[...More...]

"Rationalism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Isaiah Berlin
Sir Isaiah Berlin
Isaiah Berlin
OM CBE FBA (6 June 1909 – 5 November 1997) was a Russian-British social and political theorist, philosopher and historian of ideas.[1] Although adverse to writing, his improvised lectures and talks were recorded and transcribed, with his spoken word being converted by his secretaries into his published essays and books. Born in Riga, Latvia, in 1909, he moved to Petrograd, Russia, at the age of six, where he witnessed the revolutions of 1917. In 1921 his family moved to the UK, and he was educated at St Paul's School, London, and Corpus Christi College, Oxford.[2] In 1932, at the age of 23, Berlin was elected to a prize fellowship at All Souls College, Oxford. He translated works by Ivan Turgenev
Ivan Turgenev
from Russian into English and, during the war, worked for the British Diplomatic Service. From 1957 to 1967 he was Chichele Professor of Social and Political Theory at the University of Oxford
[...More...]

"Isaiah Berlin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

August Wilhelm Schlegel
August Wilhelm (after 1812: von) Schlegel (8 September 1767 – 12 May 1845), usually cited as August Schlegel, was a German poet, translator and critic, and with his brother Friedrich Schlegel the leading influence within Jena
Jena
Romanticism. His translations of Shakespeare
Shakespeare
turned the English dramatist's works into German classics.[3] Schlegel was also the first professor of Sanskrit
Sanskrit
in Continental Europe and produced a translation of the Bhagavad Gita.Contents1 Life 2 Evaluations 3 Honors 4 Portraits 5 Selected works5.1 Letters6 Notes 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksLife[edit]Die Marktkirche Anfang des 19. Jahrhunderts; Ölgemälde nach Domenico Quaglio von 1832Schlegel was born in Hanover, where his father, Johann Adolf Schlegel, was a Lutheran pastor
[...More...]

"August Wilhelm Schlegel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Karl Wilhelm Friedrich Schlegel
Karl Wilhelm Friedrich (after 1814: von) Schlegel (10 March 1772 – 12 January 1829), usually cited as Friedrich Schlegel, was a German poet, literary critic, philosopher, philologist and Indologist. With his older brother, August Wilhelm Schlegel, he was one of the main figures of the Jena
Jena
romantics. He was a zealous promoter of the Romantic movement and inspired Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Adam Mickiewicz and Kazimierz Brodziński. Schlegel was a pioneer in Indo-European studies, comparative linguistics, morphological typology, and was the first to notice what became known as Grimm's law. As a young man he was an atheist, a radical, and an individualist
[...More...]

"Karl Wilhelm Friedrich Schlegel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.