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Romanesque Architecture
Romanesque architecture
Romanesque architecture
is an architectural style of medieval Europe characterized by semi-circular arches. There is no consensus for the beginning date of the Romanesque style, with proposals ranging from the 6th to the 11th century, this later date being the most commonly held. It developed in the 12th century into the Gothic style, marked by pointed arches. Examples of Romanesque architecture
Romanesque architecture
can be found across the continent, making it the first pan-European architectural style since Imperial Roman architecture. The Romanesque style in England is traditionally referred to as Norman architecture. Combining features of ancient Roman and Byzantine buildings and other local traditions, Romanesque architecture
Romanesque architecture
is known by its massive quality, thick walls, round arches, sturdy pillars, barrel vaults, large towers and decorative arcading
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Ravenna
Ravenna
Ravenna
(Italian pronunciation: [raˈvenna], also locally [raˈvɛnna] ( listen); Romagnol: Ravèna) is the capital city of the Province of Ravenna, in the Emilia-Romagna
Emilia-Romagna
region of Northern Italy. It was the capital city of the Western Roman Empire from 402 until that empire collapsed in 476. It then served as the capital of the Ostrogothic Kingdom
Ostrogothic Kingdom
until it was re-conquered in 540 by the Byzantine Empire. Afterwards, the city formed the centre of the Byzantine Exarchate of Ravenna
Exarchate of Ravenna
until the invasion of the Lombards
Lombards
in 751, after which it became the seat of the Kingdom of the Lombards. Although an inland city, Ravenna
Ravenna
is connected to the Adriatic Sea
Adriatic Sea
by the Candiano Canal
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Croatia
Coordinates: 45°10′N 15°30′E / 45.167°N 15.500°E / 45.167; 15.500 Republic
Republic
of Croatia Republika Hrvatska[a]FlagCoat of armsAnthem: "Lijepa naša domovino" "Our Beautiful Homeland"Location of  Croatia  (dark green) – in Europe  (green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (green)Capital and largest city Zagreb 45°48′N 16°0′E / 45.800°N 16.000°E / 45.800; 16.000Official languages CroatianRecognised national languages See Languages of CroatiaWriting system Latin
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Almenno San Bartolomeo
Bartolomeo or Bartolommeo is a masculine Italian given name, the Italian equivalent of Bartholomew. Its diminutive form is Baccio. People with the name include: Bartolomeo Aimo
Bartolomeo Aimo
(1889–1970), Italian professional bicycle road racer Bartolomeo Altomonte, a.k.a. Bartholomäus Hohenberg (1694–1783), Austrian baroque painter Bartolomeo Amico
Bartolomeo Amico
a.k.a. Bartholomeus Amicus (1562–1649), Jesuit priest, teacher and writer who spent his adult life in Naples Bartolomeo Ammanati
Bartolomeo Ammanati
(1511–1592), Florentine architect and sculptor Bartolomeo Avanzini (1608–1658), Italian architect of the Baroque period Bartolomeo Bacilieri
Bartolomeo Bacilieri
(1842–1923), Italian cardinal, Bishop of Verona 1900–1923 Bartolomeo Barbarino (c. 1568–c
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Chapel
The term chapel usually refers to a place of prayer and worship that is attached to a larger, often nonreligious institution or that is considered an extension of a primary religious institution. It may be part of a larger structure or complex, such as a college, hospital, palace, prison, funeral home, church, synagogue or mosque,[1] located on board a military or commercial ship, or it may be an entirely free-standing building, sometimes with its own grounds.[2] Chapel
Chapel
has also referred to independent or nonconformist places of worship in Great Britain—outside the established church.[3][4] Until the Protestant
Protestant
Reformation, a chapel denoted a place of worship that was either at a secondary location that was not the main responsibility of the local parish priest, or that belonged to a person or institution
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William Gunn (writer)
William Gunn (1750–1841) was an English clergyman and miscellaneous writer. Life[edit] Gunn was born on 7 April 1750 at Guildford, Surrey, the son of Alexander Gunn of Irstead, Norfolk. He attended Fletcher's private school at Kingston-upon-Thames for six years. In 1784 he entered Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, as a sizar.[1] He took holy orders, in 1784 became rector of Sloley, Norfolk, and in 1786 obtained the consolidated livings of Barton Turf and Irstead. The latter he resigned in 1829 in favour of John Gunn, on receiving the vicarage of Gorleston, Suffolk. In 1795 he obtained the degree of B.D. as a 'ten-year man'. During a residence in Rome he obtained permission to search the Vatican and other libraries for manuscripts relating to the history of England, and published anonymously, as the result of his research, in 1803, a collection of Extracts from sixteenth-century state papers
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Arcisse De Caumont
Arcisse de Caumont (20 August 1801, Bayeux – 16 April 1873) was a French historian and archaeologist.Contents1 Biography 2 Works 3 Bibliography 4 ReferencesBiography[edit] Arcisse Caumont was born at Bayeux to François de Caumont and Marie-Louise de Mathan Hue. One of his mentors was Charles de Gerville, known, amongst other things, for coining the term "roman".[1] In 1810, he was sent to school at Falaise. There, the high school principal, Jean-Louis-François Hervieu put him in charge of maintaining the physics instruments. This enraptured the young de Caumont, who had a penchant for studying natural sciences; at age 15, he would give lessons to his classmates. In 1817, back at Bayeux, he entered the high school, and after passing his baccalauréat, he entered law school. He graduated as a bachelor in law on 30 December 1822 and as a master of the law on 28 August 1824
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Auguste Le Prévost
Auguste Le Prévost
Auguste Le Prévost
(3 June 1787 in Bernay, Eure
Bernay, Eure
– 14 July 1859 in La Vaupalière) was a French geologist, philologist, archaeologist and historian. While studying classics and law, Le Prevost developed a passion for history and archeology. To further it, he learned, besides Latin
Latin
and Greek, English, Italian, German, Swedish, Hebrew
Hebrew
and Sanskrit. His encyclopedic knowledge, the critical and rigorous method he applied to his research, were clearly an innovation in his time. As an historian, Le Prevost pioneered, along with his friend Arcisse de Caumont, research on the Romanesque and Gothic architecture in Normandy and France
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Cathedral
A cathedral is a Christian church which contains the seat of a bishop,[1] thus serving as the central church of a diocese, conference, or episcopate.[2] The counterpart term for such a church in German is Dom from Latin
Latin
domus ecclesiae or domus episcopalis; also Italian Duomo, Dutch Domkerk and cognates in many other European languages
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Romance Languages
Pontic SteppeDomestication of the horse Kurgan Kurgan
Kurgan
culture Steppe culturesBug-Dniester Sredny Stog Dnieper-Donets Samara Khvalynsk YamnaMikhaylovka cultureCaucasusMaykopEast-AsiaAfanasevoEastern EuropeUsatovo Cernavodă CucuteniNorthern EuropeCorded wareBaden Middle DnieperBronze AgePontic SteppeChariot Yamna Catacomb Multi-cordoned ware Poltavka SrubnaNorthern/Eastern SteppeAbashevo culture Andronovo SintashtaEuropeGlobular Amphora Corded ware Beaker Unetice Trzciniec Nordic Bronze Age Terramare Tumulus
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Oxford English Dictionary
The Oxford
Oxford
English Dictionary (OED) is the main historical dictionary of the English language, published by the Oxford University
Oxford University
Press. It traces the historical development of the English language, providing a comprehensive resource to scholars and academic researchers, as well as describing usage in its many variations throughout the world.[2][3] The second edition came to 21,728 pages in 20 volumes, published in 1989. Work began on the dictionary in 1857, but it was not until 1884 that it began to be published in unbound fascicles as work continued on the project, under the name of A New English Dictionary on Historical Principles; Founded Mainly on the Materials Collected by The Philological Society
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Southern France
Southern France
France
or the South of France, colloquially known as le Midi,[1][2] is a defined geographical area consisting of the regions of France
France
that border the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
south of the Marais Poitevin,[3] Spain, the Mediterranean, and Italy. The Midi includes:[4]Aquitaine The island of Corsica Languedoc-Roussillon Midi-Pyrénées Poitou-Charentes
Poitou-Charentes
(the southern parts)[3] Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur Rhône-Alpes
Rhône-Alpes
(the southern parts)This area corresponds in large part to Occitania, the territory in which Occitan (French: langue d'oc) — as distinct from the langues d'oïl of northern France — was historically the dominant language
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Symmetrical
Symmetry
Symmetry
(from Greek συμμετρία symmetria "agreement in dimensions, due proportion, arrangement")[1] in everyday language refers to a sense of harmonious and beautiful proportion and balance.[2][3][a] In mathematics, "symmetry" has a more precise definition, that an object is invariant to any of various transformations; including reflection, rotation or scaling
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Conisbrough Castle
Conisbrough
Conisbrough
Castle
Castle
is a medieval fortification in Conisbrough, South Yorkshire, England. The castle was initially built in the 11th century by William de Warenne, the Earl of Surrey, after the Norman conquest of England in 1066. Hamelin Plantagenet, the illegitimate, parvenu son of Henry II, acquired the property by marriage in the late 12th century. Hamelin and his son William rebuilt the castle in stone, including its prominent 28-metre (92 ft)-high keep. The castle remained in the family line into the 14th century, despite being seized several times by the Crown. The fortification was then given to Edmund of Langley, passing back into royal ownership in 1461. Conisbrough
Conisbrough
fell into ruin, its outer wall badly affected by subsidence, and was given to the Carey family in the 16th century
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Pier (architecture)
A pier, in architecture, is an upright support for a structure or superstructure such as an arch or bridge. Sections of structural walls between openings (bays) can function as piers.Contents1 Description 2 Bridge
Bridge
piers 3 Examples3.1 St Peter's Basilica4 See also 5 References 6 External linksDescription[edit] The simplest cross section of the pier is square, or rectangular, but other shapes are also common. In medieval architecture, massive circular supports called drum piers, cruciform (cross-shaped) piers, and compound piers are common architectural elements. Columns are a similar upright support, but stand on a round base
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Roman Empire
Mediolanum
Mediolanum
(286–402, Western) Augusta Treverorum Sirmium Ravenna
Ravenna
(402–476, Western) Nicomedia
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