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Roman Numidia
French Algeria
Algeria
(19th - 20th centuries)French conquest French governorsResistance PacificationEmir Abdelkader Fatma N'SoumerMokrani Revolt Cheikh BouamamaNationalism RCUA FLN GPRAAlgerian War 1958 putsch 1961 putschÉvian Accords Independence referendumPied-Noir Harkis Oujda GroupContemporary era 1960s–80sArab nationalism 1965 putschBerber Spring 1988 Riots1990s Algerian Civil War
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Numidia, Pennsylvania
Numidia is a census-designated place (CDP) in Columbia County, Pennsylvania, United States. The population was 244 at the 2010 census.[1] It is part of the Bloomsburg–Berwick Micropolitan Statistical Area.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Demographics 4 Transportation 5 Education 6 Climate 7 ReferencesHistory[edit] Numidia was historically named "Leestown". A hotel was built in Numidia in 1832. The town was laid out in 1835 by Elijah Prince, who renamed the community "New Media"
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Vandalic War
Lazic WarPetra PhasisOtherConquest of Spania MelantiasThe Vandalic War
Vandalic War
(Greek: Βανδηλικὸς πόλεμος) was a conflict fought in North Africa
North Africa
(largely in modern Tunisia) between the forces of the Eastern Roman ("Byzantine") Empire and the Vandalic Kingdom of Carthage, in 533–534. It was the first of Justinian I's wars of reconquest of the lost Western Roman Empire. The Vandals
Vandals
had occupied Roman North Africa
North Africa
in the early 5th century, and established an independent kingdom there. Under their first king, Geiseric, the formidable Vandal navy carried out pirate attacks across the Mediterranean, sacked Rome
Rome
and defeated a massive Roman invasion in 468
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Roknia
Roknia
Roknia
is a necropolis in the Guelma
Guelma
region of north-east Algeria consisting of more than 7000 dolmens spread over an area of 2 km.[1] Notes[edit]^ "Algérie - Roknia
Roknia
— GeneaWiki"
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Madghacen
Madghacen
Madghacen
(Berber languages: imedɣasen; also spelled Medracen or Medghassen or Madghis) is a royal mausoleum-temple of the Berber Numidian Kings which stands near Batna city in Aurasius Mons in Numidia
Numidia
- Algeria.[1]Contents1 History 2 Threats 3 References 4 Further readingHistory[edit] Madghis was a king[2] of independent kingdoms of the Numidia, between 300 to 200 BC Near the time of neighbor King Masinissa
Masinissa
and their earliest Roman contacts
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Jedars
Jedars
Jedars
(French spelling: Djedars) are thirteen Berber mausoleums located south of Tiaret
Tiaret
city in Algeria. The name is derived from the Arabic: جدار‎ jidār (wall), which is used locally to refer to ancient monumental ruins. These pre-Islamic tombs date from Late Antiquity (4th-7th? centuries CE).[1]Contents1 Construction 2 Epigraphy and iconography 3 Age 4 History and archaeology 5 External links 6 See also 7 References 8 BibliographyConstruction[edit] The tombs are situated on the tops of two hills in the mountainous Frenda
Frenda
area, around 30 km south of Tiaret. There are three sepulchres on Jabal Lakhdar (35°06′47″N 1°12′45″E / 35.113098°N 1.212475°E / 35.113098; 1.212475), and ten on Jabal Arawi (35°03′48″N 1°11′01″E / 35.063391°N 1.183733°E / 35.063391; 1.183733, also known as Ternaten) 6 km south of the first group
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Archeology Of Algeria
Algeria
Algeria
is rich in prehistoric memorials of human occupation, especially in megalithic remains, of which nearly every known kind has been found in the country. Numerous flints of palaeolithic type have been discovered, notably at Tlemcen
Tlemcen
and Kolea. Near Djelfa, in the Great Atlas, and at Mechra-Sfa ("ford of the flat stones"), a peninsula in the valley of the river Mina not far from Tiaret, are vast numbers of megalithic monuments
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Getulia
Gaetuli
Gaetuli
was the romanised name of an ancient Berber tribe inhabiting Getulia. The latter district covered the large desert region south of the Atlas Mountains, bordering the Sahara. Other documents place Gaetulia in pre-Roman times along the Mediterranean coasts of what is now Algeria
Algeria
and Tunisia, and north of the Atlas. The Zenatas are believed to be descendants of the Gaetuli.Contents1 Region 2 Roman Perceptions 3 History 4 Culture4.1 Lifestyle 4.2 Language 4.3 Economy 4.4 Religion5 See also 6 ReferencesRegion[edit]Map locating Getulia south of Mauretania.Getulia was the name given to an ancient district in the Maghreb, which in the usage of Roman writers comprised the nomadic Berber tribes of the southern slopes of the Aures Mountains
Aures Mountains
and Atlas Mountains, as far as the Atlantic, and the oases in the northern part of the Sahara
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Punic Wars
The Punic Wars
Punic Wars
were a series of three wars fought between Rome and Carthage
Carthage
from 264 BC to 146 BC.[1] At the time, they were some of the largest wars that had ever taken place.[2] The term Punic comes from the Latin
Latin
word Punicus (or Poenicus), meaning "Carthaginian", with reference to the Carthaginians' Phoenician ancestry.[3] The main cause of the Punic Wars
Punic Wars
was the conflicts of interest between the existing Carthaginian Empire and the expanding Roman Republic. The Romans were initially interested in expansion via Sicily
Sicily
(which at that time was a cultural melting pot), part of which lay under Carthaginian control. At the start of the First Punic War
First Punic War
(264-241 BC), Carthage
Carthage
was the dominant power of the Western Mediterranean, with an extensive maritime empire
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Jugurthine War
French Algeria
French Algeria
(19th - 20th centuries)French conquest French governorsResistance PacificationEmir Abdelkader Fatma N'SoumerMokrani Revolt Cheikh BouamamaNationalism RCUA FLN GPRAAlgerian War 1958 putsch 1961 putschÉvian Accords Independence referendumPied-Noir Harkis Oujda GroupContemporary era 1960s–80sArab nationalism 1965 putschBerber Spring 1988 Riots1990s
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Mauretania Caesariensis
Mauretania
Mauretania
Caesariensis ( Latin
Latin
for "Caesarian Mauretania") was a Roman province located in what is now Algeria
Algeria
in the Maghreb
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Africa (Roman Province)
French Algeria
Algeria
(19th - 20th centuries)French conquest French governorsResistance PacificationEmir Abdelkader Fatma N'SoumerMokrani Revolt Cheikh BouamamaNationalism RCUA FLN GPRAAlgerian War 1958 putsch 1961 putschÉvian Accords Independence referendumPied-Noir Harkis Oujda GroupContemporary era 1960s–80sArab nationalism 1965 putschBerber Spring 1988 Riots1990s
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Praetorian Prefecture Of Africa
The praetorian prefecture of Africa (Latin: praefectura praetorio Africae) was a major administrative division of the Eastern Roman Empire located in the Maghreb. With its seat centered at Carthage, it was established after the reconquest of northwestern Africa from the Vandals
Vandals
in 533-534 by the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I
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Ahaggar Mountains
The Hoggar Mountains
Hoggar Mountains
(Arabic: جبال هقار‎, Berber: idurar n Ahaggar, Tuareg: Idurar Uhaggar), also known as the Ahaggar Mountains, are a highland region in the central Sahara, southern Algeria, along the Tropic of Cancer. The mountains cover an area of approximately 550,000 square km (212,000 square miles).[1]Contents1 Geography 2 Environment2.1 Fauna and flora3 Cultural significance 4 Panoramic view 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksGeography[edit]An oasis in the Hoggar MountainsThis mountainous region is located about 1,500 km (930 mi) south of the capital, Algiers. The area is largely rocky desert with an average elevation of more than 900 m (3,000 ft) above sea level
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Exarchate Of Africa
French Algeria
French Algeria
(19th - 20th centuries)French conquest French governorsResistance PacificationEmir Abdelkader Fatma N'SoumerMokrani Revolt Cheikh BouamamaNationalism RCUA FLN GPRAAlgerian War 1958 putsch 1961 putschÉvian Accords Independence referendumPied-Noir Harkis Oujda GroupContemporary era 1960s–80sArab nationalism 1965 putschBerber Spring 1988 Riots1990s
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Early African Church
The name Early African Church
Early African Church
is given to the Christian
Christian
communities inhabiting the region known politically as Roman Africa, and comprised geographically within the following limits, namely: the Mediterranean littoral between Cyrenaica
Cyrenaica
on the east and the river Ampsaga (now the Oued Rhumel (fr)) on the west; that part of it that faces the Atlantic Ocean being called Mauretania. The evangelization of Africa followed much the same lines as those traced by Roman civilization.Contents1 History before the Arab Conquest 2 The Arab Conquest 3 Fate of indigenous Christianity in northwest Africa after the Arab conquest 4 Christian
Christian
literature of Africa 5 Liturgy 6 Dialects 7 ReferencesHistory before the Arab Conquest[edit] The delimitation of the ecclesiastical boundaries of the African Church is a matter of great difficulty
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