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Roman And Byzantine Greece
The history of Byzantine Greece
Greece
mainly coincides with the Eastern Roman or Byzantine Empire.Contents1 Roman Greece 2 Eastern Roman (Byzantine) Empire 3 Further invasions and reorganization 4 Bulgarian threat 5 Normans
Normans
and Franks 6 Ottoman threat and conquest 7 Gallery 8 See also 9 References 10 BibliographyRoman Greece[edit] Main article: Roman GreeceArch of Galerius
Galerius
and Rotunda, Thessaloniki.The Greek peninsula became a Roman protectorate in 146 BC, and the Aegean islands
Aegean islands
were added to this territory in 133 BC. Athens
Athens
and other Greek cities revolted in 88 BC, and the peninsula was crushed by the Roman general Sulla
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History Of Greece
The history of Greece
Greece
encompasses the history of the territory of the modern nation-state of Greece, as well as that of the Greek people and the areas they inhabited and ruled historically
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Arch Of Galerius And Rotunda
The Arch of Galerius
Galerius
(Gr.: Αψίδα του Γαλερίου) or Kamara (Gr.: Καμάρα) and the Rotunda (Ροτόντα) are neighbouring early 4th-century AD monuments in the city of Thessaloniki, in the region of Central Macedonia
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Greek Civil War
 Kingdom of Greece Hellenic ArmySupported by:   United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(before 1947)   United States
United States
(after 1947) Pr
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Greek Military Junta Of 1967–74
The Greek military junta of 1967–1974, commonly known as the Regime of the Colonels (Greek: καθεστώς των Συνταγματαρχών, kathestós ton Syntagmatarchón [kaθesˈtos ton sin'daɣ.matarˈxon]), or in Greece
Greece
simply The Junta (/ˈdʒʌntə/ or /ˈhʊntə/; Greek: Χούντα [ˈxunda]), The Dictatorship
Dictatorship
(Η Δικτατορία, I Diktatoría) and The Seven Years (Η Επταετία, I Eptaetía), was a series of far-right military juntas that ruled Greece
Greece
following the 1967 Greek coup d'état led by a group of colonels on 21 April 1967. The dictatorship ended on 24 July 1974 under the pressure of the Turkish invasion of Cyprus
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Third Hellenic Republic
Third Hellenic Republic
Third Hellenic Republic
(Greek: Γ΄ Ελληνική Δημοκρατία) is the period in modern Greek history that stretches from 1974, with the fall of Greek military junta and the final abolition of the Greek monarchy, to the present day. It is considered the third period of republican rule in Greece, following the First Republic during the Greek War of Independence (1821–32) and the Second Republic during the temporary abolition of the monarchy in 1924–35. The term "Metapolitefsi" (Μεταπολίτευση) is commonly used for this period, but this term concerns more often with the first years immediately after the fall of the military junta
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Greek Art
Greek art
Greek art
began in the Cycladic and Minoan civilization, and gave birth to Western classical art in the subsequent Geometric, Archaic and Classical periods (with further developments during the Hellenistic
Hellenistic
Period). It absorbed influences of Eastern civilizations, of Roman art and its patrons, and the new religion of Orthodox Christianity in the Byzantine era and absorbed Italian and European ideas during the period of Romanticism
Romanticism
(with the invigoration of the Greek Revolution), until the Modernist
Modernist
and Postmodernist
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Constitutional History Of Greece
In the modern history of Greece, starting from the Greek War of Independence, the Constitution of 1975/1986/2001 is the last in a series of democratically adopted Constitutions (with the exception of the Constitutions of 1968 and 1973 imposed by a dictatorship).Contents1 Greek War of Independence 2 From the absolute to the constitutional monarchy (1833–1924) 3 The Second Hellenic Republic
Second Hellenic Republic
and the Restoration (1925–1941) 4 The Kingdom of
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Economic History Of Greece And The Greek World
The economic history of the Greek World spans several millennia and encompasses many modern-day nation states. Since the focal point of the center of the Greek World often changed it is necessary to enlarge upon all these areas as relevant to the time
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Military History Of Greece
The military history of Greece
Greece
is the history of the wars and battles of the Greek people in Greece, the Balkans
Balkans
and the Greek colonies in the
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Names Of The Greeks
The Greeks
Greeks
(Greek: Έλληνες) have been identified by many ethnonyms. The most common native ethnonym is "Hellen" (Ἕλλην), pl. Hellenes
Hellenes
(Ἕλληνες); the name "Greeks" (Latin: Graeci) was used by the Ancient Romans and gradually entered the European languages through its use in Latin. The mythological patriarch Hellen is the named progenitor of the Greek peoples; his descendants the Aeolians, Dorians, Achaeans and Ionians
Ionians
correspond to the main Greek tribes and to the main dialects spoken in Greece
Greece
and Asia Minor (Anatolia). Among his descendants are also mentioned the Graeci and the Makedones. The first Greek-speaking people, called Myceneans
Myceneans
or Mycenean-Achaeans by historians, entered present-day Greece
Greece
sometime in the Neolithic era or the Bronze Age
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Byzantine Empire
The Byzantine
Byzantine
Empire, also referred to as the Eastern Roman Empire, was the continuation of the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in the East during Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, when its capital city was Constantinople
Constantinople
(modern-day Istanbul, which had been founded as Byzantium). It survived the fragmentation and fall of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in the 5th century AD and continued to exist for an additional thousand years until it fell to the Ottoman Turks in 1453.[2] During most of its existence, the empire was the most powerful economic, cultural, and military force in Europe
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Thessaloniki
Thessaloniki
Thessaloniki
(Greek: Θεσσαλονίκη, Thessaloníki [θesaloˈnici] ( listen)), also familiarly known as Thessalonica, Salonica, or Salonika is the second-largest city in Greece, with over 1 million inhabitants in its metropolitan area, and the capital of Macedonia, the administrative region of Central Macedonia and the Decentralized Administration of Macedonia and Thrace.[4][5] Its nickname is η Συμπρωτεύουσα (Symprotévousa), literally "the co-capital",[6] a reference to its historical status as the Συμβασιλεύουσα (Symvasilévousa) or "co-reigning" city of the Eastern Roman (Byzantine) Empire, alongside Constantinople.[7] Thessaloniki
Thessaloniki
is located on the Thermaic Gulf, at the northwest corner of the Aegean Sea
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Axis Occupation Of Greece
The occupation of Greece
Greece
by the Axis Powers
Axis Powers
(Greek: Η Κατοχή, I Katochi, meaning "The Occupation") began in April 1941 after Nazi Germany invaded Greece
Greece
to assist its ally, Fascist Italy, which had been at war with Greece
Greece
since October 1940. Following the conquest of Crete, all of Greece
Greece
was occupied by June 1941. The occupation in the mainland lasted until Germany and its ally Bulgaria
Bulgaria
were forced to withdraw under Allied pressure in early October 1944
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Roman Republic
The Roman Republic
Republic
(Latin: Res publica Romana; Classical Latin: [ˈreːs ˈpuːb.lɪ.ka roːˈmaː.na]) was the era of classical Roman civilization beginning with the overthrow of the Roman Kingdom, traditionally dated to 509 BC, and ending in 27 BC with the establishment of the Roman Empire. It was during this period that Rome's control expanded from the city's immediate surroundings to hegemony over the entire Mediterranean
Mediterranean
world. Roman government was headed by two consuls, elected annually by the citizens and advised by a senate composed of appointed magistrates. As Roman society was very hierarchical by modern standards, the evolution of the Roman government was heavily influenced by the struggle between the patricians, Rome's land-holding aristocracy, who traced their ancestry to the founding of Rome, and the plebeians, the far more numerous citizen-commoners
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Aegean Islands
The Aegean Islands
Aegean Islands
(Greek: Νησιά Αιγαίου, transliterated: Nisiá Aigaíou; Turkish: Ege Adaları) are the group of islands in the Aegean Sea, with mainland Greece
Greece
to the west and north and Turkey to the east; the island of Crete
Crete
delimits the sea to the south, those of Rhodes, Karpathos
Karpathos
and Kasos
Kasos
to the southeast. The ancient Greek name of the Aegean Sea, Archipelago
Archipelago
(ἀρχιπέλαγος, archipelagos) was later applied to the islands it contains and is now used more generally, to refer to any island group. The vast majority of the Aegean Islands
Aegean Islands
belong to Greece, being split among nine administrative regions
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