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Roger Miller
Roger Dean Miller, Sr. (January 2, 1936 – October 25, 1992) was an American singer-songwriter, musician, and actor, best known for his honky-tonk-influenced novelty songs. His most recognized tunes included the chart-topping country and pop hits "King of the Road", "Dang Me", and "England Swings", all from the mid-1960s Nashville sound era. After growing up in Oklahoma
Oklahoma
and serving in the United States Army, Miller began his musical career as a songwriter in the late 1950s, writing such hits as "Billy Bayou" and "Home" for Jim Reeves
Jim Reeves
and "Invitation to the Blues" for Ray Price. He later began a recording career and reached the peak of his fame in the mid-1960s, continuing to record and tour into the 1990s, charting his final top 20 country hit "Old Friends" with Willie Nelson
Willie Nelson
in 1982. He also wrote and performed several of the songs for the 1973 Disney animated film Robin Hood
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South Carolina
South Carolina
South Carolina
(/ˌkærəˈlaɪnə/ ( listen)) is a U.S. state in the southeastern region of the United States. The state is bordered to the north by North Carolina, to the south and west by Georgia, across the Savannah River, and to the east by the Atlantic Ocean. South Carolina
South Carolina
became the eighth state to ratify the U.S. Constitution, on May 23, 1788. South Carolina
South Carolina
became the first state to vote in favor of secession from the Union on December 20, 1860. After the American Civil War, it was readmitted into the United States on June 25, 1868. South Carolina
South Carolina
is the 40th most extensive and 23rd most populous U.S. state. Its GDP
GDP
as of 2013 was $183.6 billion, with an annual growth rate of 3.13%.[6] South Carolina
South Carolina
is composed of 46 counties
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Country Music Hall Of Fame
The Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum
Museum
in Nashville, Tennessee, is one of the world's largest museums and research centers dedicated to the preservation and interpretation of American vernacular music. Chartered in 1964, the museum has amassed one of the world's most extensive musical collections.[1]Contents1 History of the museum 2 Current museum 3 The Country Music Hall of Fame 4 The Museum
Museum
collection 5 Architecture and design 6 Timeline 7 Senior leadership 8 See also 9 Further reading 10 References 11 External linksHistory of the museum[edit] The Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum
Museum
is one of the world's largest and most active popular music research centers and the world's largest repository of country music artifacts
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Korean War
Military stalemateNorth Korean invasion of South Korea
South Korea
repelled Subsequent U.S.-led United Nations
United Nations
invasion of
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Fort Worth, Texas
Fort Worth is the 16th-largest city in the United States
United States
and the fifth-largest city in the state of Texas.[7] The city is located in North Central Texas. It is the county seat of Tarrant County, covering nearly 350 square miles (910 km2) into three other counties; Denton, Parker and Wise. According to the 2016 census estimates, Fort Worth's population is 854,113.[5] The city is the second-largest in the Dallas–Fort Worth–Arlington metropolitan area (the "DFW Metroplex"). The city was established in 1849 as an Army outpost on a bluff overlooking the Trinity River. Today, Fort Worth still embraces its Western heritage and traditional architecture and design.[8][9] USS Fort Worth (LCS-3) is the first ship of the United States Navy named after the city.[10] Fort Worth is home to the Van Cliburn International Piano Competition and several world-class museums designed by internationally known contemporary architects
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Nashville Sound
The Nashville sound
Nashville sound
originated during the mid 1950s as a subgenre of American country music, replacing the chart dominance of the rough honky tonk music which was most popular in the 1940s and 1950s with "smooth strings and choruses", "sophisticated background vocals" and "smooth tempos".[1][2] It was an attempt "to revive country sales, which had been devastated by the rise of rock 'n' roll."[2]Contents1 Origins 2 Countrypolitan 3 Country pop 4 Examples of the Nashville sound 5 Examples of Countrypolitan 6 See also 7 ReferencesOrigins[edit] The Nashville sound
Nashville sound
was pioneered by staff at RCA Victor, Columbia Records and Decca Records
Decca Records
in Nashville, Tennessee
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Oklahoma
English ( Choctaw
Choctaw
official within Choctaw
Choctaw
Nation,
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Tony Award
The Antoinette Perry
Antoinette Perry
Award for Excellence in Broadway Theatre,[1] more commonly known as the Tony Award, recognizes excellence in live Broadway theatre. The awards are presented by the American Theatre Wing and The Broadway League[2] at an annual ceremony in New York City. The awards are given for Broadway productions and performances, and an award is given for regional theatre
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Alan Jackson
Alan Eugene Jackson (born October 17, 1958) is an American country singer and songwriter. He is known for blending traditional honky tonk and mainstream country sounds and penning many of his own songs. Jackson has recorded 16 studio albums, three greatest hits albums, two Christmas albums, two gospel albums and several compilations. Jackson has sold over 80 million records, with 66 titles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks chart. Of the 66 titles, and six featured singles, 38 have reached the top five and 35 have claimed the number one spot. Out of 15 titles to reach the Billboard Top Country Albums chart, nine have been certified multi-platinum. He is the recipient of two Grammy Awards, 16 CMA Awards, 17 ACM Awards and nominee of multiple other awards. He is a member of the Grand Ole Opry, and was inducted into the Georgia Music Hall of Fame in 2001
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Honky-tonk
A honky-tonk (also called honkatonk, honkey-tonk, or tonk) is both a bar that provides country music for the entertainment of its patrons and the style of music played in such establishments. Bars of this kind are common in the South and Southwest United States. Many eminent country music artists, such as Jimmie Rodgers, Loretta Lynn, Patsy Cline, Ernest Tubb, and Merle Haggard, began their careers as amateur musicians in honky-tonks
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Jail
A prison,[a] also known as a correctional facility, jail,[b] gaol (dated, British English), penitentiary (American English), detention center[c] (American English) or remand center[d] is a facility in which inmates are forcibly confined and denied a variety of freedoms under the authority of the state. Prisons are most commonly used within a criminal justice system: people charged with crimes may be imprisoned until they are brought to trial; those pleading or being found guilty of crimes at trial may be sentenced to a specified period of imprisonment. Besides their use for punishing crimes, jails and prisons are frequently used by authoritarian regimes against perceived opponents. In American English, prison and jail are often treated as having separate definitions. The term prison or penitentiary tends to describe institutions that incarcerate people for longer periods of time, such as many years, and are operated by the state or federal governments
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Great Depression
The Great Depression
Great Depression
was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, beginning in the United States. The timing of the Great Depression
Great Depression
varied across nations; in most countries it started in 1929 and lasted until the late-1930s.[1] It was the longest, deepest, and most widespread depression of the 20th century.[2] In the 21st century, the Great Depression
Great Depression
is commonly used as an example of how far the world's economy can decline.[3] The Great Depression
Great Depression
started in the United States
United States
after a major fall in stock prices that began around September 4, 1929, and became worldwide news with the stock market crash of October 29, 1929 (known as Black Tuesday). Between 1929 and 1932, worldwide gross domestic product (GDP) fell by an estimated 15%
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Cotton
Cotton
Cotton
is a soft, fluffy staple fiber that grows in a boll, or protective case, around the seeds of the cotton plants of the genus Gossypium
Gossypium
in the mallow family Malvaceae. The fiber is almost pure cellulose. Under natural conditions, the cotton bolls will increase the dispersal of the seeds. The plant is a shrub native to tropical and subtropical regions around the world, including the Americas, Africa, and India. The greatest diversity of wild cotton species is found in Mexico, followed by Australia
Australia
and Africa.[1] Cotton
Cotton
was independently domesticated in the Old and New Worlds. The fiber is most often spun into yarn or thread and used to make a soft, breathable textile
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National FFA Organization
National FFA Organization is an American 501(c)(3) youth organization, specifically a career and technical student organization, based on middle and high school classes that promote and support agricultural education. It was founded in 1925 at Virginia Polytechnic Institute, by agriculture teachers, Henry C. Groseclose,[9] Walter Newman, Edmund Magill and Harry Sanders as Future Farmers of Virginia. In 1928, it became a nationwide organization known as Future Farmers of America. In 1988 the name was changed to the National FFA Organization, now commonly referred to as FFA, to recognize that the organization is for those with diverse interests in the food, fiber and natural resource industries, encompassing science, business and technology in addition to production agriculture.[10] Today FFA is among the largest youth organization in the United States, with 649,355 members in 7,859 chapters[11] throughout all 50 states, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands
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Grand Ole Opry
The Grand Ole Opry
Grand Ole Opry
is a weekly country-music stage concert in Nashville, Tennessee, which was founded on November 28, 1925, by George D. Hay as a one-hour radio "barn dance" on WSM
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