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Roger De Clarendon
Sir Roger Clarendon (c.1350–1402), was a royal bastard and conspirator, who was executed for treason.[1] Biography[edit] Clarendon was a natural son of Edward, the Black Prince, and his mistress, Edith Willesford. Being regarded as a possible pretender, he was hanged, and beheaded, by order of Henry IV of England
Henry IV of England
in 1402. His execution was made the subject of one of the articles exhibited by Archbishop Scrope
Archbishop Scrope
of York against Henry IV during his rebellion in 1405. Among his descendants are the Bowyer-Smyth baronets.[1][2] Notes[edit]^ a b Given-Wilson 2004. ^ Rigg 1887, p. 398.References[edit]Given-Wilson, C. (2004). "Clarendon, Sir Roger (c.1350–1402)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
Dictionary of National Biography
(online ed.). Oxford University Press
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Natural Son
Legitimacy, in traditional Western common law, is the status of a child born to parents who are legally married to each other, and of a child conceived before the parents obtain a legal divorce. Conversely, illegitimacy (or bastardy) has been the status of a child born outside marriage, such a child being known as a bastard, or love child, when such a distinction has been made from other children. Depending on local legislation, legitimacy can affect a child's rights of inheritance to the putative father's estate and the child's right to bear the father's surname or hereditary title
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Black Prince
Edward of Woodstock, known as the Black Prince (15 June 1330 – 8 June 1376),[1][a] was the eldest son of Edward III, King of England, and Philippa of Hainault
Philippa of Hainault
and participated in the early years of the Hundred Years War. He died before his father and so never became king. His son, Richard II, succeeded Edward III. Edward was created Duke of Cornwall
Duke of Cornwall
in 1337. He was guardian of the kingdom in his father's absence in 1338, 1340, and 1342. He was created Prince of Wales
Prince of Wales
in 1343 and knighted by his father at La Hogne in 1346. In 1346 Edward commanded the vanguard at the Battle of Crécy, his father intentionally leaving him to win the battle. He was named the Black Prince after the battle of Crécy, at which he was possibly accoutred in black armour. He took part in Edward III's 1349 Calais expedition
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Henry IV Of England
Henry IV (15 April 1367[1] – 20 March 1413), also known as Henry Bolingbroke (/ˈbɒlɪŋbrʊk/), was King of England
King of England
and Lord of Ireland
Ireland
from 1399 to 1413, and asserted the claim of his grandfather, Edward III, to the Kingdom of France. Henry was born at Bolingbroke Castle
Bolingbroke Castle
in Lincolnshire
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Archbishop Scrope
Richard le Scrope (c. 1350 – 8 June 1405), Bishop of Lichfield and Archbishop of York, was executed in 1405 for his participation in the Northern Rising against King Henry IV.Contents1 Family 2 Career 3 Rebellion and death 4 Shakespeare and Scrope 5 Footnotes 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksFamily[edit] Richard Scrope, born about 1350, was the third son of Henry Scrope, 1st Baron Scrope of Masham, and his wife, Joan, whose surname is unknown
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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Leslie Stephen
Sir Leslie Stephen
Leslie Stephen
KCB (28 November 1832 – 22 February 1904) was an English author, critic, historian, biographer, and mountaineer, and father of Virginia Woolf
Virginia Woolf
and Vanessa Bell.Contents1 Life1.1 Marriage1.1.1 (1) Harriet (Minny) Thackeray 1867–1875 1.1.2 (2) Julia Duckworth
Julia Duckworth
1878–18951.2 Career 1.3 Mountaineering2 List of selected publications 3 Death 4 Family tree 5 References 6 Bibliography6.1 Anne Thackeray
Anne Thackeray
Ritchie7 External links7.1 External imagesLife[edit] Sir Leslie Stephen
Leslie Stephen
came from a distinguished intellectual family,[1] and was born at 14 (later renumbered 42) Hyde Park Gate, Kensington
Kensington
in London, the son of Sir James Stephen and (Lady) Jane Catherine (née Venn) Stephen
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Dictionary Of National Biography
The Dictionary of National Biography
Biography
(DNB) is a standard work of reference on notable figures from British history, published from 1885. The updated Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
Biography
(ODNB) was published on 23 September 2004 in 60 volumes and online, with 50,113 biographical articles covering 54,922 lives.Contents1 First series 2 Supplements and revisions 3 Concise dictionary 4 Oxford Dictionary of National Biography 5 First series contents 6 See also 7 Notes 8 External linksFirst series[edit] Hoping to emulate national biographical collections published elsewhere in Europe, such as the Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie (1875), in 1882 the publisher George Smith (1824–1901), of Smith, Elder & Co., planned a universal dictionary that would include biographical entries on individuals from world history. He approached Leslie Stephen, then editor of the Cornhill Magazine, owned by Smith, to become the editor
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Roger Clarendon
Sir Roger Clarendon (c.1350–1402), was a royal bastard and conspirator, who was executed for treason.[1] Biography[edit] Clarendon was a natural son of Edward, the Black Prince, and his mistress, Edith Willesford. Being regarded as a possible pretender, he was hanged, and beheaded, by order of Henry IV of England in 1402. His execution was made the subject of one of the articles exhibited by Archbishop Scrope of York against Henry IV during his rebellion in 1405. Among his descendants are the Bowyer-Smyth baronets.[1][2] Notes[edit]^ a b Given-Wilson 2004. ^ Rigg 1887, p. 398.References[edit]Given-Wilson, C. (2004). "Clarendon, Sir Roger (c.1350–1402)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/5452.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)  Rigg, James McMullen (1887). "Clarendon, Roger". In Stephen, Leslie. Dictionary of National Biography. 10. London: Smith, Elder & Co
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Bowyer-Smyth Baronets
The Smith, later Smyth, later Smijth, later Bowyer-Smijth, later Bowyer-Smyth Baronetcy, of Hill Hall in the County of Essex, was created on 28 November 1661 for Thomas Smith, High Sheriff of Essex in 1663. He was the great grandson of John Smith of Saffron Walden, Essex.Contents1 History 2 Smith, later Smyth, later Smijth, later Bowyer-Smijth, later Bowyer-Smyth baronets, of Hill Hall (1661) 3 See also 4 Notes 5 ReferencesHistory[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (December 2012) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)According to tradition John Smith was a descendant of Sir Roger de Clarendon, a natural son of Edward, the Black Prince. He was granted arms in 1545, and the original family crest of an eagle holding an ostrich feather was used to denote descent from Sir Roger de Clarendon
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