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Rodolfo Quezada Toruño
Rodolfo Ignacio Quezada Toruño (8 March 1932 – 4 June 2012) was a Guatemalan cardinal of the Catholic Church. He was Archbishop of Guatemala
Guatemala
City, having previously served as Bishop of Zacapa y Santo Cristo de Esquipulas from 1980 to 2001. He was elevated to the cardinalate in 2003. Biography[edit] The oldest of three children, Quezada was born in Guatemala City
Guatemala City
to René Quezada Alejos and Clemencia Toruño Lizarralde.[1] After studying philosophy at the Seminary of San José in El Salvador, he earned a Licentiate in Theology from the University of Innsbruck
University of Innsbruck
in Austria in 1959 and a Doctorate in Canon Law from the Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome in 1962
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His Eminence
His Eminence
His Eminence
(abbreviation "H.Em.", oral address Your Eminence or Most Reverend Eminence) is a historical style of reference for high nobility, still in use in various religious contexts.Contents1 Catholicism 2 Eastern Orthodox Church 3 Oriental Orthodoxy 4 Other religions 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksCatholicism[edit] The style remains in use as the official style or standard of address in reference to a cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church, reflecting his status as a Prince of the Church. A long
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Coadjutor Bishop
A coadjutor bishop (or bishop coadjutor) is a bishop in the Catholic, Anglican, and (historically) Eastern Orthodox
Eastern Orthodox
churches whose main role is to assist the diocesan bishop in the administration of the diocese.[1][2] The coadjutor (literally, "co-assister" in Latin) is a bishop himself, although he is also appointed as vicar general. The coadjutor bishop is, however, given authority beyond that ordinarily given to the vicar general, making him co-head of the diocese in all but ceremonial precedence. In modern times, the coadjutor automatically succeeds the diocesan bishop upon the latter's retirement, removal, or death. Roman Catholic Church[edit] Main article: Bishop (Catholic Church) In the Roman Catholic Church, a coadjutor bishop is an immediate collaborator of the diocesan bishop, similar to an auxiliary bishop.[3][4] However, unlike auxiliary bishops, coadjutors are given the right of succession to the episcopal see
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University Of San Carlos Of Guatemala
The Universidad de San Carlos de Guatemala
Guatemala
(USAC, University of San Carlos of Guatemala) is the biggest and oldest university of Guatemala; it is also the fourth founded in the Americas. Established in the Kingdom of Guatemala
Guatemala
during the Spanish colony, it was the most prestigious institution of higher education in Central America
Central America
— and the only one in Guatemala
Guatemala
until 1954.[a] The University has had five major transformations:Royal and Pontifical University of San Carlos
University of San Carlos
Borromeo (1676–1829): Established during the colony by the Spanish Crown in the 17th century, approved by the Vatican and directed by regular orders of the Catholic Church
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Auxiliary Bishop
An auxiliary bishop is a bishop assigned to assist the diocesan bishop in meeting the pastoral and administrative needs of the diocese. Auxiliary bishops are titular bishops of sees that no longer exist. In Catholic Church, auxiliary bishops exist in both the Latin Church and in the Eastern Catholic Churches. The particular duties of an auxiliary bishop are given by the diocesan bishop and can vary widely depending on the auxiliary bishop, the ordinary, and the needs of the diocese. In a larger archdiocese, they might be in assigned to serve a portion of the archdiocese (sometimes called deaneries, regions, or vicariates) or to serve a particular population such as immigrants or those of a particular heritage or language
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Titular Bishop
A titular bishop in various churches is a bishop who is not in charge of a diocese. By definition, a bishop is an "overseer" of a community of the faithful, so when a priest is ordained a bishop, the tradition of the Roman Catholic and Orthodox churches is that he be ordained for a specific place. There are more bishops than there are functioning dioceses
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Pope Paul VI
Pope
Pope
Paul VI
Paul VI
(Latin: Paulus VI; Italian: Paolo VI), born Giovanni Battista Enrico Antonio Maria Montini[a] (Italian pronunciation: [dʒioˈvanːi baˈtːista enˈriko anˈtonjo marˈija monˈtini]; 26 September 1897 – 6 August 1978), reigned from 21 June 1963 to his death in 1978. Succeeding John XXIII, he continued the Second Vatican Council
Second Vatican Council
which he closed in 1965, implementing its numerous reforms, and fostered improved ecumenical relations with Eastern Orthodox and Protestants, which resulted in many historic meetings and agreements.[7] Montini served in the Holy See's Secretariat of State from 1922 to 1954
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Bishop (Catholic Church)
In the Catholic Church, a bishop is an ordained minister who holds the fullness of the sacrament of holy orders and is responsible for teaching doctrine,[1] governing Catholics in his jurisdiction,[2] sanctifying the world[3] and representing the Church.[4][5] Catholics trace the origins of the office of bishop to the apostles, who it is believed were endowed with a special charism by the Holy Spirit
Holy Spirit
at Pentecost.[6] Catholics believe this special charism has been transmitted through an unbroken succession of bishops by the laying on of hands in the sacrament of holy orders.[7] Diocesan bishops—known as eparchs in the Eastern Catholic Churches—are assigned to govern local regions within the Catholic Church known as dioceses in the Latin Church
Latin Church
and eparchies in the Eastern Churches
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Girolamo Prigione
Girolamo Prigione (12 October 1921 – 27 May 2016) was an Italian prelate of the Roman Catholic Church. Prigione was born in Castellazzo Bormida and ordained a priest on 18 May 1944. Prigione was appointed Titular Archbishop
Titular Archbishop
of the Lauriacum as well as Apostolic Nuncio
Apostolic Nuncio
of El Salvador and Guatemala
Guatemala
on 27 August 1968. He was consecrated a bishop on 24 November 1968. Prigione was appointed Apostolic Delegate
Apostolic Delegate
to Ghana
Ghana
and Nigeria. He was then appointed Apostolic Delegate
Apostolic Delegate
to Mexico on 7 February 1978, during the pontificate of Paul VI. After the 33-day papacy of John Paul I, Prigione played an important role in implementing major changes in the Church's direction under John Paul II, clamping down on liberation theology and reasserting papal primacy
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Franciscan
The Franciscans
Franciscans
are a group of related mendicant religious orders within the Catholic
Catholic
Church, founded in 1209 by Francis of Assisi. These orders include the Order of Friars Minor, the Order of Saint Clare, and the Third Order
Third Order
of Saint Francis. These orders adhere to the teachings and spiritual disciplines of the founder and of his main associates and followers, such as Clare of Assisi, Anthony of Padua, and Elizabeth of Hungary, among many others.[2] Francis began preaching around 1207 and traveled to Rome
Rome
to seek approval from Pope Innocent III
Pope Innocent III
in 1209 to form a new religious order. The original Rule of Saint Francis approved by the Pope
Pope
disallowed ownership of property, requiring members of the order to beg for food while preaching
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Consecrator
Consecrator
Consecrator
is a term used in the Roman Catholic Church
Catholic Church
to designate a bishop who ordains a priest to the episcopal state. The term is also used in Eastern Rite Churches and in Anglican
Anglican
communities.Contents1 History 2 Validity 3 Co-Consecrators 4 See also 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] The church has always sought to assemble as many bishops as possible for the election and consecration of new bishops.[1] Although due to difficulties in travel, timing, and frequency of consecrations, this was reduced to the requirement that all comprovincial (of the same province) bishops participate
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Metropolitan Bishop
In Christian
Christian
churches with episcopal polity, the rank of metropolitan bishop, or simply metropolitan, pertains to the diocesan bishop or archbishop of a metropolis (then more precisely called metropolitan archbishop); that is, the chief city of a historical Roman province, ecclesiastical province, or regional capital. Before the establishment of patriarchs (beginning in AD 325), metropolitan was the highest episcopal rank in the Eastern rites of the Church
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Episcopal Conference
An episcopal conference, sometimes called conference of bishops, is an official assembly of the bishops of the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
in a given territory. Episcopal conferences have long existed as informal entities. The first assembly of bishops to meet regularly, with its own legal structure and ecclesial leadership function, is the Swiss Bishops' Conference, which was founded in 1863;[1] more than forty episcopal conferences existed before the Second Vatican Council.[2] Their status was confirmed by the Second Vatican Council[3] and further defined by Pope
Pope
Paul VI's 1966 motu proprio, Ecclesiae sanctae.[4][5] Episcopal conferences are generally defined by geographic borders, often national ones, with all the bishops in a given country belonging to the same conference, although they may also include neighboring countries
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Cardinal (Catholicism)
A cardinal (Latin: Sanctae Romanae Ecclesiae cardinalis, literally Cardinal of the Holy Roman Church) is a senior ecclesiastical leader, considered a Prince of the Church, and usually (now always for those created when still within the voting age-range) an ordained bishop of the Roman Catholic Church. The cardinals of the Church are collectively known as the College of Cardinals. The duties of the cardinals include attending the meetings of the College and making themselves available individually or in groups to the Pope
Pope
as requested. Most have additional duties, such as leading a diocese or archdiocese or managing a department of the Roman Curia. A cardinal's primary duty is electing the bishop of Rome
Rome
when the see becomes vacant
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Guatemalan Civil War
Guatemala
Guatemala
borderFranja Transversal del Norte[7]Belligerents URNG
URNG
(from 1982) PGT (until 1998) MR-13 (1960–1971) FAR (
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Politics Of Guatemala
Politics of Guatemala
Guatemala
takes place in a framework of a presidential representative democratic republic, where by the President of Guatemala
Guatemala
is both head of state, head of government, and of a multi-party system. Executive power is exercised by the government. Legislative power
Legislative power
is vested in both the government and the Congress of the Republic
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