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Rockfield, Monmouthshire
Rockfield is a small village in Monmouthshire, south east Wales. It is located beside the River Monnow, about 2 miles (3.2 km) north-west of Monmouth, at the junction of the B4233 to Abergavenny and the B4347 to Grosmont. Rockfield Studios
Rockfield Studios
is situated just south of the village.[1]Contents1 Placename 2 Church of St Cenedlon 3 Other notable buildings 4 Gallery 5 ReferencesPlacename[edit] The use of the English name, Rockfield, is first documented in 1566. However, it is believed that the name dates back to the 11th century, being derived from the French, Rocheville. The pre-Norman name for the settlement was Llanoronwy, and the Welsh Academy dictionary still gives the Welsh language
Welsh language
name for the village as Llanoronwy Carn Cenhedlon
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John Etherington Welch Rolls
John Etherington Welch Rolls
John Etherington Welch Rolls
(4 May 1807 – 27 May 1870) was a High Sheriff of Monmouthshire, art collector, Deputy Lieutenant and Justice of the Peace. Rolls was President of, and co-founded the Monmouth Show. Life[edit] Rolls was born in 1807 to John Rolls
John Rolls
of The Hendre, near Monmouth, and his wife Martha. On 26 May 1833 he married Elizabeth Long who was the granddaughter of the 7th Earl of Northesk. Rolls became High Sheriff of Monmouthshire in 1842.[1][2] Rolls and his wife had several children but only one son, John Allan Rolls, who became 1st Baron Llangattock.[3] Rolls' brother Alexander married the actress Helen Barry.Woodblock print of The HendreRolls was responsible for extending the size of The Hendre
The Hendre
using the services of Thomas Henry Wyatt
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Welsh Language
All UK speakers: 700,000+ (2012)[1]Wales: 562,016 speakers (19.0% of the population of Wales),[2] (data from 2011 Census); All skills (speaking, reading, or writing): 630,062 language users[3] England: 110,000–150,000 (estimated) Argentina: 1,500-5,000[4][5](data not from 2011 census) Canada: L1,<3,885,[6] United States: ~2,235 (2009-2013) (2017)Language familyIndo-EuropeanCelticInsular CelticBrittonicWesternWelshEarly formsCommon BrittonicOld WelshMiddle WelshWriting systemLatin (Welsh alphabet) Welsh BrailleOfficial statusOfficial language inWalesRecognised minority language in United Kingdom
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Ordnance Survey National Grid
The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
National Grid reference
Grid reference
system is a system of geographic grid references used in Great Britain, distinct from latitude and longitude. It is often called British National Grid (BNG).[1][2] The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
(OS) devised the national grid reference system, and it is heavily used in their survey data, and in maps based on those surveys, whether published by the Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
or by commercial map producers
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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River Monnow
The River Monnow
River Monnow
(Welsh: Afon Mynwy) marks the England– Wales
Wales
border for much of its 42 miles (68 km) length. After flowing through southwest Herefordshire, England, and eastern Monmouthshire, Wales, its confluence with the River Wye
River Wye
is approximately 1⁄3 mile (0.54 km) south of Monmouth. The Monnow rises near Craswall
Craswall
on Cefn Hill just below the high Black Mountains, Wales. It flows southwards, gaining the waters of its tributaries the Escley Brook and Olchon Brook near Clodock and the waters of the River Honddu,[1] from the Welsh side of the Black Mountains, near Pandy. The river then flows briefly eastwards, to Pontrilas, where it is joined by its largest tributary, the River Dore before again turning southwards. At Monmouth, the Monnow joins into the River Wye
River Wye
with the River Trothy
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Monmouth
Monmouth
Monmouth
(/ˈmɒnməθ/ MON-məth, /ˈmʌn-/ MUN-; Welsh: Trefynwy meaning "town on the Monnow") is the historic county town of Monmouthshire, Wales. It is situated where the River Monnow
River Monnow
meets the River Wye, within 2 miles (3.2 km) of the border with England. The town is 30 miles (48 km) northeast of Cardiff, and 113 miles (182 km) west of London. It is within the Monmouthshire
Monmouthshire
local authority, and the parliamentary constituency of Monmouth. Monmouth's population in the 2011 census was 10,508, rising from 8,877 in 2001. The town was the site of a small Roman fort, Blestium, and became established after the Normans
Normans
built a castle here after 1067. Its medieval stone gated bridge is the only one of its type remaining in Britain
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Half-timber
Timber framing
Timber framing
and "post-and-beam" construction are traditional methods of building with heavy timbers, creating structures using squared-off and carefully fitted and joined timbers with joints secured by large wooden pegs. It is commonplace in wooden buildings from the 19th century and earlier. If the structural frame of load-bearing timber is left exposed on the exterior of the building it may be referred to as half-timbered, and in many cases the infill between timbers will be used for decorative effect. The method comes from working directly from logs and tree rather than pre-cut dimensional lumber
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Old Red Sandstone
The Old Red Sandstone
Sandstone
is an assemblage of rocks in the North Atlantic region largely of Devonian
Devonian
age. It extends in the east across Great Britain, Ireland and Norway, and in the west along the northeastern seaboard of North America. It also extends northwards into Greenland and Svalbard.[3] In Britain it is a lithostratigraphic unit (a sequence of rock strata) to which stratigraphers accord supergroup status[4] and which is of considerable importance to early paleontology. For convenience the short version of the term, ORS is often used in literature on the subject
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Aston Webb
Sir Aston Webb
Aston Webb
GCVO CB RA FRIBA (22 May 1849 – 21 August 1930) was an English architect who designed the principal facade of Buckingham Palace and the main building of the Victoria and Albert Museum, among other major works around England, many of them in partnership with Ingress Bell. He was President of the Royal Academy
Royal Academy
from 1919 to 1924, and the founding Chairman of the London
London
Society.Contents1 Life1.1 Honours and awards2 Works 3 Gallery of architectural work 4 Notes 5 External linksLife[edit] The son of a watercolourist (and former pupil of the landscape artist David Cox), Edward Webb, Aston Webb
Aston Webb
was born in Clapham, south London, on 22 May 1849[1] and received his initial architectural training articled in the firm of Banks and Barry from 1866 to 1871, after which he spent a year travelling in Europe and Asia
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Normans
The Normans
Normans
(Norman: Normaunds; French: Normands; Latin: Normanni) were the people who, in the 10th and 11th centuries, gave their name to Normandy, a region in France
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John Rolls, 1st Baron Llangattock
John Allan Rolls, 1st Baron Llangattock, DL (19 February 1837 – 24 September 1912) was a Victorian landowner, politician, socialite, local benefactor and agriculturalist. He lived at The Hendre, a Victorian country house north of Monmouth.Contents1 Biography 2 Family tree 3 Gallery 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] He was the only son of John Etherington Welch Rolls
John Etherington Welch Rolls
and his wife Elizabeth Mary Long. Elizabeth was a daughter of Walter Long of Preshaw and granddaughter of William Carnegie, 7th Earl of Northesk. Rolls was educated at Eton College
Eton College
and Christ Church, Oxford,[1] later becoming Captain in the Royal Gloucestershire Hussars
Royal Gloucestershire Hussars
Yeomanry Cavalry, and was afterwards appointed honorary colonel of the 4th Welsh Brigade R.F.A. In 1868 he married Georgiana Marcia Maclean in London
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List Of United Kingdom Locations
A gazetteer of place names in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
showing each place's county, unitary authority or council area and its geographical coordinates.A B C D E F G H I, J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X–ZSee also External linksThe United KingdomLocation names beginning with ALocation names beginning with Aa–Ak Location names beginning with Al Location names beginning with Am–Ar Location names beginning with As–AzLocation names beginning with BLocation names beginning with Bab–Bal Location names beginning with Bam
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Kingdom Of Gwent
Gwent (Old Welsh: Guent) was a medieval Welsh kingdom, lying between the Rivers Wye and Usk. It existed from the end of Roman rule in Britain in about the 5th century until the Norman conquest of England in the 11th century. Along with its neighbour Glywyssing, it seems to have had a great deal of cultural continuity with the earlier Silures,[1] keeping their own courts and diocese separate from the rest of Wales
Wales
until their conquest by Gruffydd ap Llywelyn
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Mercia
Mercia
Mercia
(/ˈmɜːrʃiə, -ʃə/;[1] Old English: Miercna rīce) was one of the kingdoms of the Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
Heptarchy. The name is a Latinisation of the Old English
Old English
Mierce or Myrce, meaning "border people" (see March). The kingdom was centred on the valley of the River Trent
River Trent
and its tributaries, in the region now known as the English Midlands. The kingdom's "capital" was the town of Tamworth, which was the seat of the Mercian Kings from at least c. 584, when King Creoda built a fortress at the town. For 300 years (between 600 and 900), having annexed or gained submissions from five of the other six kingdoms of the Heptarchy
Heptarchy
(East Anglia, Essex, Kent, Sussex and Wessex), Mercia
Mercia
dominated England south of the River Humber: this period is known as the Mercian Supremacy
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John Prichard
John Prichard
John Prichard
(6 May 1817 – 13 October 1886) was a Welsh architect in the neo-Gothic style.[1] As diocesan architect of Llandaff, he was involved in the building or restoration of many churches in south Wales.Contents1 Biography 2 Buildings 3 References 4 BibliographyBiography[edit] John Prichard
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