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Rochester Institute Of Technology
NCAALiberty League AHC CHA MAISAMascot RITchie the Tiger[5][6]Website www.rit.edu Rochester Institute of Technology
Rochester Institute of Technology
(RIT) is a private doctoral university within the town of Henrietta in the Rochester, New York metropolitan area. RIT is composed of nine academic colleges, including National Technical Institute for the Deaf. The Institute is one of only a small number of engineering institutes in the State of New York, including New York Institute of Technology, SUNY Polytechnic Institute, and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
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Swamp
A swamp is a wetland that is forested.[1] Many swamps occur along large rivers where they are critically dependent upon natural water level fluctuations.[2] Other swamps occur on the shores of large lakes.[3] Some swamps have hammocks, or dry-land protrusions, covered by aquatic vegetation, or vegetation that tolerates periodic inundation.[4] The two main types of swamp are "true" or swamp forests and "transitional" or shrub swamps. In the boreal regions of Canada, the word swamp is colloquially used for what is more correctly termed a bog or muskeg. The water of a swamp may be fresh water, brackish water or seawater
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US News & World Report
U.S. News & World Report is an American media company that publishes news, opinion, consumer advice, rankings, and analysis. Founded as a newsweekly magazine in 1933, U.S. News transitioned to primarily web-based publishing in 2010. U.S. News is best known today for its influential Best Colleges and Best Hospitals rankings, but it has expanded its content and product offerings in education, health, money, careers, travel, and cars. The rankings are popular in North America
America
but have drawn widespread criticism from colleges, administrations, and students for their dubious, disparate, and arbitrary nature. The ranking system by U.S
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Vocational Education
Vocational education
Vocational education
is education that prepares people to work in various jobs, such as a trade, a craft, or as a technician. Vocational education is sometimes referred to as career education or technical education.[1] A vocational school is a type of educational institution specifically designed to provide vocational education. Vocational education
Vocational education
can take place at the post-secondary, further education, and higher education level; and can interact with the apprenticeship system
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New York Institute Of Technology
Suburban/Urban, 1,050 acres (4.2 km2) ( Old Westbury
Old Westbury
campus)[3][7] ( Manhattan
Manhattan
campus)[8]Colors Blue and Gold[9]          Nickname BearsSporting
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Research University
A research university is a university that expects all its tenured and tenure-track faculty to continuously engage in research, as opposed to merely requiring it as a condition of an initial appointment or tenure.[1] Such universities can be recognized by their strong focus on innovative research and the prestige of their brand names.[2] On the one hand, research universities strive to recruit faculty who are the most brilliant minds in their disciplines in the world, and their students enjoy the opportunity to learn from such experts.[3] On the other hand, new students are often disappointed to realize their undergraduate courses at research universities are overly academic and fail to provide vocational training with immediate "real world" applications; but many employers value degrees from research universities because they know that such coursework develops fundamental life skills like critical thinking.[4] Higher education institutions which are not research universities (or do no
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University
A university (Latin: universitas, "a whole") is an institution of higher (or tertiary) education and research which awards academic degrees in various academic disciplines
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Erie Canal
The Erie Canal
Canal
is a canal in New York, United States
United States
that is part of the east–west, cross-state route of the New York State Canal
Canal
System (formerly known as the New York State Barge
Barge
Canal). Originally, it ran 363 miles (584 km) from where Albany meets the Hudson River
Hudson River
to where Buffalo meets Lake Erie. It was built to create a navigable water route from New York City
New York City
and the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
to the Great Lakes. When completed in 1825, it was the second longest canal in the world (after the Grand Canal
Canal
in China) and greatly affected the development and economy of New York, New York City, and the United States.[2] The canal was first proposed in the 1780s, then re-proposed in 1807
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Private University
Private universities are typically not operated by governments, although many receive tax breaks, public student loans, and grants. Depending on their location, private universities may be subject to government regulation. This is in contrast to public universities and national universities
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Freeway
A controlled-access highway is a type of highway which has been designed for high-speed vehicular traffic, with all traffic flow and ingress/egress regulated. Common English terms are freeway (in Australia, South Africa
South Africa
and parts of the United States
United States
and Canada), motorway (in the United Kingdom, Ireland, New Zealand
New Zealand
and parts of Australia), expressway (in some parts of Canada, parts of the United States, and many Asian countries), and autoroute (in Québec, Canada). Other similar terms include Interstate and parkway
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Inner Loop (Rochester)
The Inner Loop is a "C"-shaped freeway in downtown Rochester, New York, in the United States. Only the portions north of Interstate 490 (I-490) are signed as the "Inner Loop". The official western terminus of the Inner Loop is at I-490 exit 13 in the shadow of Frontier Field
Frontier Field
west of downtown, while the eastern terminus is at I-490 exits 15 and 16 directly south of downtown on the east bank of the Genesee River. This section of the loop is designated New York State Route 940T (NY 940T), an unsigned reference route, by the New York State Department of Transportation. Although the NY 940T designation is not signed, the road is signed with orange trapezoidal route markers containing the words "Inner Loop" in white. Construction of the Inner Loop began in the early 1950s—when the city's population was well over 300,000 and 33% higher than it was in 2000—and completed in 1965
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National Collegiate Athletic Association
The National Collegiate Athletic Association
National Collegiate Athletic Association
(NCAA)[a] is a non-profit organization which regulates athletes of 1,281 institutions and conferences. It also organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States
United States
and Canada, and helps more than 480,000 college student-athletes who compete annually in college sports. The organization is headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana. In its 2016-17 fiscal year the NCAA took in $1.06 billion dollars in revenue, over 82% of which was generated by the Division I Men's Basketball
Basketball
Tournament
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RIT Tigers
see textTiger's historic range in about 1850 (pale yellow) and in 2006 (in green).[2]Synonyms Felis
Felis
tigris Linnaeus, 1758[3] Tigris
Tigris
striatus Severtzov, 1858 Tigris
Tigris
regalis Gray, 1867The tiger ( Panthera
Panthera
tigris) is the largest cat species, most recognizable for their pattern of dark vertical stripes on reddish-orange fur with a lighter underside. The species is classified in the genus Panthera
Panthera
with the lion, leopard, jaguar, and snow leopard. Tigers are apex predators, primarily preying on ungulates such as deer and bovids. They are territorial and generally solitary but social animals, often requiring large contiguous areas of habitat that support their prey requirements
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Athletic Nickname
The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States
United States
is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. Typically as a matter of engendering school spirit, the institution either officially or unofficially uses this moniker of the institution's athletic teams also as a nickname to refer to people associated with the institution, especially its current students, but also often its alumni, its faculty, and its administration as well. This practice at the university and college tertiary higher-education level has proven so popular that it extended to the high school secondary-education level in the United States
United States
and in recent years even to the primary-education level as well
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School Colors
In the United States, school colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. Most schools have two colors, which are usually chosen to avoid conflicts with other schools[1] with which the school competes in sports and other activities. The colors are often worn to build morale among the teachers and pupils, and as an expression of school spirit.[2] School
School
colors are often found in pairs and rarely no more than trios, though some professional teams use up to four colors in a set. The choice of colors usually follows the rule of tincture from heraldry, but exceptions to this rule are known. Common primary colors include orange, purple, blue, red, and green. These colors are either paired with a color representing a metal (often black, brown, gray (or silver), white, or gold), or occasionally each other, such as orange/blue, red/green, or blue/yellow
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Suburb
A suburb is a mixed-use or residential area, existing either as part of a city or urban area or as a separate residential community within commuting distance of a city.[1] In most English-speaking countries, suburban areas are defined in contrast to central or inner-city areas, but in Australian English
Australian English
and South African English, suburb has become largely synonymous with what is called a "neighborhood" in other countries and the term extends to inner-city areas. In some areas, such as Australia, China, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and a few U.S. states, new suburbs are routinely annexed by adjacent cities
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