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Robert Penn Warren
Robert Penn Warren
Robert Penn Warren
(April 24, 1905 – September 15, 1989) was an American poet, novelist, and literary critic and was one of the founders of New Criticism. He was also a charter member of the Fellowship of Southern Writers. He founded the literary journal The Southern Review with Cleanth Brooks
Cleanth Brooks
in 1935. He received the 1947 Pulitzer Prize for the Novel
Pulitzer Prize for the Novel
for his novel All the King's Men
All the King's Men
(1946) and the Pulitzer Prize
Pulitzer Prize
for Poetry
Poetry
in 1958 and 1979
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Pulitzer Prize For Poetry
Pulitzer
Pulitzer
may refer to: Pulitzer
Pulitzer
Prize, an annual U.S. journalism, literary, and music award Pulitzer
Pulitzer
(surname) Pulitzer, Inc., a U.S
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Populism
Populism
Populism
is a political philosophy supporting the rights and power of the people in their struggle against a privileged elite.[1] Critics of populism have described it as a political approach that seeks to disrupt the existing social order by solidifying and mobilizing the animosity of the "commoner" or "the people" against "privileged elites" and the "establishment".[2] Populists can fall anywhere on the traditional left–right political spectrum of politics and often portray both bourgeois capitalists and socialist organizers as unfairly dominating the political sphere.[3] Political parties and politicians[4] often use the terms "populist" and "populism" as pejoratives against their opponents
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Martin Luther King
CampaignsMontgomery bus boycott Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom Youth March for Integrated Schools Albany Movement Birmingham campaign Walk to Freedom March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom St. Augustine movement Selma to Montgomery marches Chicago
Chicago
Open Housing Movement March Against Fear Memphis sanitation strike Poor People's CampaignDeath and memorialAssassination American federal holiday National memorial National Historical Parkv t eMartin Luther King
King
Jr. (January 15, 1929 – April 4, 1968) was an American Baptist minister and activist who became the most visible spokesperson and leader in the civil rights movement from 1954 until his death in 1968
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Racial Integration
Racial integration, or simply integration, includes desegregation (the process of ending systematic racial segregation). In addition to desegregation, integration includes goals such as leveling barriers to association, creating equal opportunity regardless of race, and the development of a culture that draws on diverse traditions, rather than merely bringing a racial minority into the majority culture. Desegregation
Desegregation
is largely a legal matter, integration largely a social one.Contents1 Distinguishing integration from desegregation1.1 Distinction not universally accepted2 See also2.1 Lawsuits3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksDistinguishing integration from desegregation[edit]A white child and black child together at a parade in North College Hill, Ohio, USAMorris J. MacGregor, Jr
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Life (magazine)
Life was an American magazine that ran regularly from 1883 to 1972 and again from 1978 to 2000. During its golden age from 1936 to 1972, Life was a wide-ranging weekly general interest magazine notable for the quality of the photography. Life began as a humor magazine with limited circulation. Time owner Henry Luce
Henry Luce
bought the magazine in 1936, solely so that he could acquire the rights to its name, and launched a major weekly news magazine with a strong emphasis on photojournalism. Life was published weekly until 1972, as an intermittent "special" until 1978, and as a monthly from 1978 to 2000. After 2000, Time Inc.
Time Inc.
continued to use the Life brand for special and commemorative issues
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Agrarianism
Agrarianism is a social philosophy or political philosophy which values rural society as superior to urban society, the independent farmer as superior to the paid worker, and sees farming as a way of life that can shape the ideal social values.[1] It stresses the superiority of a simpler rural life as opposed to the complexity of city life.Contents1 Philosophy 2 History 3 Agrarian parties3.1 Africa3.1.1 Tunisia3.2 Europe3.2.1 Bulgaria 3.2.2 Czechoslovakia 3.2.3 France 3.2.4 Ireland 3.2.5 Latvia 3.2.6 Lithuania 3.2.7 Poland 3.2.8 Romania 3.2.9 Serbia 3.2.10 Ukraine3.3 Oceania3.3.1 Australia 3.3.2 New Zealand4 Back-to-the-land movement 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading7.1 Agrarian values 7.2 Primary sources 7.3 Europe 7.4 North America 7.5 Global South8 External linksPhilosophy[edit] M
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Memphis, Tennessee
Memphis is a city located along the Mississippi River
Mississippi River
in the southwestern corner of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Tennessee. With an estimated 2016 population of 652,717,[5] it is the cultural and economic center of West Tennessee
Tennessee
and the greater Mid-South region that includes portions of neighborhing Arkansas
Arkansas
and Mississippi. Memphis is the seat of Shelby County, the most populous county in Tennessee
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Benito Mussolini
Benito Amilcare Andrea Mussolini
Mussolini
(/bəˈniːtoʊ mʊsəˈliːni, muːsə-/; Italian: [beˈnito mussoˈlini];[1] 29 July 1883 – 28 April 1945) was an Italian politician and journalist who was the leader of the National Fascist Party
National Fascist Party
(Partito Nazionale Fascista; PNF)
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Guggenheim Fellowship
Guggenheim Fellowships are grants that have been awarded annually since 1925 by the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation to those "who have demonstrated exceptional capacity for productive scholarship or exceptional creative ability in the arts". The roll of Fellows includes numerous Nobel Laureates, Pulitzer and other prize winners. Each year, the foundation makes several hundred awards in each of two separate competitions:one open to citizens and permanent residents of the United States and Canada. the other to citizens and permanent residents of Latin America and the Caribbean.The performing arts are excluded, although composers, film directors, and choreographers are eligible. The fellowships are not open to students, only to "advanced professionals in mid-career" such as published authors
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New College, Oxford
Benedictus benedicat. May the Blessed One give a blessing Benedicto benedicatur. Let praise be given to the Blessed OneWebsite College websiteBoat club Boat ClubMapLocation in Oxford
Oxford
city centreNew College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford
Oxford
in the United Kingdom. Founded in 1379 by William of Wykeham, the full name of the college is The Warden and Scholars of St Mary's College of Winchester in Oxford. The name "New College", however, soon came to be used following its completion in 1386 to distinguish it from the older existing college of St. Mary, now known as Oriel College.[3] In 2017, the college ranked first[4] in the Norrington Table, a table assessing the relative performance of Oxford's undergraduates in final examinations. Historically, it has been ranked highly
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Rhodes Scholar
The Rhodes Scholarship, named after the Anglo-South African mining magnate and politician Cecil John Rhodes, is an international postgraduate award for students to study at the University of Oxford.[1] It is widely considered to be one of the world's most prestigious scholarships.[2] Established in 1902, it was the first large-scale programme of international scholarships,[3] inspiring the creation of a great many other awards across the globe (such as the Fulbright
Fulbright
program, Marshall Scholarship, and the Gates Cambridge Scholarship). As elaborated on in his will, Cecil Rhodes' go
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Phi Beta Kappa
The Phi Beta Kappa Society
Phi Beta Kappa Society
(ΦΒΚ) is the oldest honor society for the liberal arts and sciences in the United States
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Latin Honors
Latin
Latin
honors are Latin
Latin
phrases used to indicate the level of distinction with which an academic degree has been earned. This system is primarily used in the United States, many countries of continental Europe, and some Southeastern Asian countries with European colonial history, such as Indonesia and the Philippines, although some institutions use translations of these phrases rather than the Latin originals. The honors distinction should not be confused with the honors degrees offered in some countries. Generally, a college's or university's regulations set out definite criteria to be met in order for a student to obtain a given honors distinction
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Tennessee
Tennessee
Tennessee
(/tɛnɪˈsiː/ ( listen); Cherokee: ᏔᎾᏏ, translit. Tanasi) is a state located in the southeastern region of the United States. Tennessee
Tennessee
is the 36th largest and the 16th most populous of the 50 United States. Tennessee
Tennessee
is bordered by Kentucky and Virginia
Virginia
to the north, North Carolina
North Carolina
to the east, Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi
Mississippi
to the south, and Arkansas
Arkansas
and Missouri
Missouri
to the west. The Appalachian Mountains
Appalachian Mountains
dominate the eastern part of the state, and the Mississippi River
Mississippi River
forms the state's western border. Nashville is the state's capital and largest city, with a population of 660,388
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