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Robert Livingston Schuyler
Dr. Robert Livingston Schuyler (February 26, 1883 – August 15, 1966) was a prominent scholar of early American history and British history of the same time period. He was an educator and an editor. He spent most of his academic career at Columbia University.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Personal life 4 Books by Schuyler 5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] He was born in New York City. His father Montgomery Schuyler (1842–1914) was a journalist and architectural writer, and mother Katherine Beeckman Livingston (1842–1914), a direct descendant of Robert Livingston the Elder, the first Lord of Livingston Manor,[1] was a gifted amateur artist and singer
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New York City
Bronx, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Queens, Richmond (Staten Island)Historic colonies New Netherland Province of New YorkSettled 1624Consolidated 1898Named for James, Duke of YorkGovernment[2] • Type Mayor–Council • Body New York City
New York City
Council • Mayor Bill de Blasio
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Herbert L. Osgood
Herbert Levi Osgood (April 9, 1855 in Canton, Maine
Canton, Maine
– September 11, 1918 in New York City) was an American historian of colonial American history. As a professor at Columbia University
Columbia University
he directed numerous dissertations of scholars who became major historians. Osgood was a leader of the "Imperial historians" who studied, and often praised, the inner workings of the British Empire
British Empire
in the 18th century.Contents1 Biography 2 Scholarly work 3 See also 4 References 5 Further reading 6 Works 7 External linksBiography[edit] Osgood was born in Maine, and attended Amherst College, from which he graduated in 1877, having studied under John W. Burgess
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Chauncey Depew
Chauncey Mitchell Depew (April 23, 1834 – April 5, 1928) was an attorney for Cornelius Vanderbilt's railroad interests, president of the New York Central Railroad
New York Central Railroad
System, and a United States Senator from New York from 1899 to 1911.[1]Contents1 Early life1.1 Education2 Career2.1 Legal career 2.2 Railroad lawyer 2.3 Politics3 Personal life3.1 Yale 3.2 Associations and civic activities 3.3 Legacy4 References 5 External linksE
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Elihu Root
Elihu Root
Elihu Root
(/ˈɛlɪhjuː ˈruːt/; February 15, 1845 – February 7, 1937) was an American lawyer and statesman who served as the Secretary of State under President Theodore Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt
and as Secretary of War
Secretary of War
under Roosevelt and President William McKinley. He moved frequently between high-level appointed government positions in Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
and private-sector legal practice in New York City. For that reason, he is sometimes considered to be the prototype of the 20th century political "wise man," advising presidents on a range of foreign and domestic issues. He was elected by the state legislature as a U.S. Senator from New York
U.S. Senator from New York
and served one term, 1909–1915
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Frances Folsom Cleveland Preston
Frances Clara Cleveland Preston (July 21, 1864 – October 29, 1947) was married to the President of the United States
President of the United States
Grover Cleveland and was the First Lady of the United States
First Lady of the United States
from 1886 to 1889 and again from 1893 to 1897
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Grover Cleveland
Stephen Grover Cleveland
Grover Cleveland
(March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908) was an American politician and lawyer who was the 22nd and 24th president of the United States, the only president in American history to serve two non-consecutive terms in office (1885–89 and 1893–97).[1] He won the popular vote for three presidential elections – in 1884, 1888, and 1892 – and was one of two Democrats (with Woodrow Wilson) to be elected president during the era of Republican political domination dating from 1861 to 1933. Cleveland was the leader of the pro-business Bourbon Democrats
Bourbon Democrats
who opposed high tariffs, Free Silver, inflation, imperialism, and subsidies to business, farmers, or veterans on libertarian philosophical grounds
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Edith Roosevelt
Edith Kermit Carow Roosevelt (August 6, 1861 – September 30, 1948) was the second wife of President Theodore Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt
and served as First Lady of the United States
First Lady of the United States
during his presidency from 1901 to 1909. She was the first First Lady
First Lady
to employ a full-time, salaried social secretary
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Bronxville, New York
Bronxville /ˈbrɒŋksvɪl/ is a village in Westchester County, New York, located about 15 miles (24 km) north of midtown Manhattan.[3] It is part of the town of Eastchester. The village comprises 1 square mile (2.5 km2) of land in its entirety, approximately 20% of the town of Eastchester. As of the 2010 U.S. census, Bronxville had a population of 6,323.[4] As of 2016, Bronxville was rated the number one most expensive suburb around America's ten largest cities by CNBC with a median home value of $2.33 million.[5] In 2017, it was ranked 8th in Bloomberg's "America's 100 Richest Places"
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Kansas City
The Kansas
Kansas
City metropolitan area is a 15-county metropolitan area anchored by Kansas
Kansas
City, Missouri, that straddles the border between the U.S. states of Missouri
Missouri
and Kansas. With a population of 2,104,509, it ranks as the second largest metropolitan area with its core in Missouri
Missouri
(after Greater St. Louis). Alongside Kansas
Kansas
City, the area includes a number of other cities and suburbs, the largest being Overland Park, Kansas; Kansas
Kansas
City, Kansas; Olathe, Kansas; and Independence, Missouri; each over 100,000 in population
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Royal Historical Society
The Royal Historical Society (abbr. RHistS; founded 1868) is a learned society of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
which advances scholarly studies of history. The society was founded and received its Royal Charter
Royal Charter
in 1868. Until 1872 it was known as the Historical Society.[1] In 1897, it merged with (or absorbed) the Camden Society, founded in 1838.[2] It is now based at University College London.Contents1 Present 2 Presidents 3 See also 4 References 5 Bibliography 6 External linksPresent[edit] In its origins, and for many years afterwards, the society was effectively a gentlemen's club. It now exists to promote historical research worldwide, representing historians engaged in professional research and presenting history in the public domain. The society provides a varied programme of lectures and one-day and two-day conferences covering various kinds of historical issues
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New York (state)
New York is a state in the northeastern United States. New York was one of the original thirteen colonies that formed the United States. With an estimated 19.85 million residents in 2017,[4] it is the fourth most populous state. To differentiate from its city with the same name, it is sometimes called New York State. The state's most populous city, New York City
New York City
makes up over 40% of the state's population. Two-thirds of the state's population lives in the New York metropolitan area, and nearly 40% lives on Long Island.[9] The state and city were both named for the 17th-century Duke of York, the future King James II of England
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Thomas Babington Macaulay, 1st Baron Macaulay
Thomas Babington Macaulay, 1st Baron Macaulay, FRS FRSE
FRSE
PC (25 October 1800 – 28 December 1859) was a British historian and Whig politician. He wrote extensively as an essayist and reviewer; his books on British history have been hailed as literary masterpieces.[1] Macaulay held political office as the Secretary at War
Secretary at War
between 1839 and 1841, and the Paymaster-General
Paymaster-General
between 1846 and 1848. He played a major role in introducing English and western concepts to education in India, publishing his argument on the subject in the "Macaulay Minute" published in 1835
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Harvard University
Harvard University
Harvard University
is a private Ivy League
Ivy League
research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Established in 1636 and named for clergyman John Harvard (its first benefactor), its history, influence, and wealth have made it one of the world's most prestigious universities.[8] Harvard is the United States' oldest institution of higher learning,[9] and the Harvard Corporation
Harvard Corporation
(formally, the President and Fellows of Harvard College) is its first chartered corporation. Although never formally affiliated with any denomination, the early College primarily trained Congregational and Unitarian clergy. Its curriculum and student body were gradually secularized during the 18th century, and by the 19th century, Harvard had emerged as the central cultural establishment among Boston elites.[10][11] Following the American Civil War, President Charles W
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Gouverneur Morris
Gouverneur Morris
Gouverneur Morris
I (30 January 1752 – 6 November 1816) was an American statesman, a Founding Father of the United States, and a signatory to the Articles of Confederation
Articles of Confederation
and the United States Constitution. He wrote the Preamble to the United States
United States
Constitution and has been called the "Penman of the Constitution."[1] In an era when most Americans thought of themselves as citizens of their respective states, Morris advanced the idea of being a citizen of a single union of states.[2] He represented New York in the United States Senate from 1800 to 1803. Morris was born into a wealthy landowning family in New York City. After attending Columbia College, he studied law under Judge William Smith and earned admission to the bar. He was elected to the New York Provincial Congress before serving in the Continental Congress
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The New York Times
The New York Times
The New York Times
(sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City
New York City
with worldwide influence and readership.[6][7][8] Founded in 1851, the paper has won 122 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper.[9][10] As of September 2016, it had the largest combined print-and-digital circulation of any daily newspaper in the United States.[11] The New York Times is ranked 18th in the world by circulation. The paper is owned by The New York Times
The New York Times
Company, which is publicly traded but primarily controlled by the Ochs-Sulzberger family through a dual-class share structure.[12] It has been owned by the family since 1896; A.G
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