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Robert Leslie Pollington Milburn
Robert Leslie Pollington "Bobby" Milburn FSA[1] (28 July 1907 – 14 February 2000) was an Anglican
Anglican
priest in the 20th century.[2] Milburn was educated at Oundle School
Oundle School
and Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge[3] and ordained in 1935. Between then and 1957 he was a fellow, tutor and chaplain at Worcester College, Oxford. He was then appointed as the Dean of Worcester
Dean of Worcester
Cathedral[4] where he served until 1968. During this time he was Librarian and Master of the Fabric and was highly knowledgeable about both. He had the crypt, originally built by St Wulstan, bishop at the time of the Norman invasion, cleaned, cleared and painted. He worked hard to maintain the fabric in good condition. He founded the Worcester Civic Society and was often seen around the city where he always preferred to walk or bicycle to travelling by car
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Society Of Antiquaries Of London
The Society of Antiquaries of London
London
(SAL) is a learned society "charged by its Royal Charter of 1751 with 'the encouragement, advancement and furtherance of the study and knowledge of the antiquities and history of this and other countries'."[1] It is based at Burlington House, Piccadilly, London
London
(a
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Richard Holdsworth
Richard Holdsworth (or Houldsworth, Oldsworth) (1590, Newcastle-on-Tyne
Newcastle-on-Tyne
– 22 August 1649) was an English academic theologian, and Master of Emmanuel College, Cambridge
Emmanuel College, Cambridge
from 1637 to 1643. Although Emmanuel was a Puritan
Puritan
stronghold, Holdsworth, who in religion agreed,[1] in the political sphere resisted Parliamentary interference, and showed Royalist sympathies.Contents1 Life 2 Educational views 3 Notes 4 Further reading 5 External linksLife[edit] Richard Holdsworth was the son of Richard Holdswourth, Vicar of Newcastle-on-Tyne, and baptised at St Nicholas, Newcastle
St Nicholas, Newcastle
on 20 December 1590. He entered St. John's College, Cambridge
St. John's College, Cambridge
as a scholar in 1607, graduated B.A
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John Pedder (priest)
The Very Rev John Pedder, DD (c1520- 1571) was an English churchman. A Marian exile, he was Dean of Worcester from 1559 until his death.[1][2] Pedder was educated at Peterhouse, Cambridge and was later elected a Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge.[3] He was Rector of Redgrave from 1551 to 1561; and then Vicar of Snitterfield, Warwickshire from 1563; and also Rector of Withington from 1568.[4] He was appointed a Prebendary of Norwich in 1557; and of Hereford in 1563. References[edit]^  Lee, Sidney, ed. (1895). "Pedder, John". Dictionary of National Biography. 44
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Thomas Wilson (Dean Of Worcester)
The Very Rev Thomas Wilson, DD (d 20 July 1586[1]) was Dean of Worcester[2] from 1559 until his death. Wilson was born in Kendal, educated at St John's College, Cambridge and ordained. He was appointed to a living as Vicar of Church of St Peter and St Paul, Blockley. During his time as Dean of Worcester an inventory of plate and furniture was drawn up listing the cathedral's ornaments.[3] Wilson found favour with the Elizabethan court, when Sir William Cecil fell ill, and retreated to Burghley. On 12 November 1571 Thomas Wilson attended Privy Council and was appointed principal Secretary alongside Sir Francis Walsingham. In 1578 he was one of the deputies sent to the Diet of Schmalkalden. In May 1581 he was replaced by secretary Walsingham as the Queen's principal secretary, combining the two posts
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Francis Willis (academic)
Francis Willis D.D.
D.D.
(a.k.a. Francis Wyllis, died 1597) was an academic administrator at the University of Oxford
University of Oxford
and Dean of Worcester. In 1577, Willis was elected President of St John's College, Oxford, a post he held until 1590.[1] While President at St John's College, he was also Vice-Chancellor
Vice-Chancellor
of Oxford University
Oxford University
from 1587 until 1588.[2][3] Willis was Dean of Worcester
Dean of Worcester
from 1586 until his death in 1597.[4] References[edit]^ H. E. Salter and Mary D. Lobel, ed. (1954). "St. John's College". A History of the County of Oxford: Volume 3: The University of Oxford. Victoria County History. pp. 251–264. Retrieved July 25, 2011.  ^ "Previous Vice-Chancellors". University of Oxford, UK. Retrieved July 25, 2011.  ^ University of Oxford
University of Oxford
(1888)
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Richard Edes
Richard Edes (or Eedes) (1555–1604) was an English churchman. He became Dean of Worcester, and was nominated one of the translators for the Authorised King James Version, in the Second Oxford Company, but died in the earliest stages of the project. Life[edit] He was born probably in Bedfordshire, was educated at Westminster School, and was elected student of Christ Church, Oxford in 1571. There he proceeded B.A. 17 December 1574, and M.A. 2 May 1578. Taking orders he was a noted preacher. He was elected university proctor 10 April 1583, proceeded B.D. 6 July 1584, and D.D. 6 July 1590. In favour at court, he had rapid preferment, with prebends at Salisbury (1584), Christ Church (1586), and Hereford (1590). He was made treasurer of Hereford Cathedral and chaplain to the queen in 1596. On 19 June 1597 he became dean of Worcester
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James Montague (bishop)
James Montague (c. 1568 – 20 July 1618) was an English bishop.[2] Life[edit] He was the son of Sir Edward Montagu of Boughton, and grandson of Edward Montagu.[3] He was a graduate of Christ's College, Cambridge, and became in 1596 the first Master of Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge, for which he laid the foundation stone.[4] He was connected to Frances Sidney, founder of the college, his great-aunt: his maternal grandmother was her sister Lucy Sidney.[5] From that time he was a patron of Thomas Gataker
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Arthur Lake (bishop)
Arthur Lake (September 1569 – 4 May 1626) was Bishop of Bath and Wells and a translator of the King James Version of The Bible. Arthur Lake was born in Southampton
Southampton
in September 1569 the son of Almeric Lake, a minor customs official. He attended King Edward VI School, Southampton, until he was twelve and on 28 December 1581 he was elected a scholar of Winchester
Winchester
College. He stayed at Winchester until he was eighteen when he became a scholar of New College, Oxford. He matriculated in July 1588, was elected a fellow of the college in 1589, accepted the degree of BA on 4 June 1591 and MA on 3 May 1595. He was presented to the rectory of Havant, Hampshire
Havant, Hampshire
in 1599. He resigned his fellowship at Oxford
Oxford
in 1600, and on 16 June was admitted a fellow of Winchester
Winchester
College
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Joseph Hall (bishop)
Joseph Hall (1 July 1574 – 8 September 1656) was an English bishop, satirist and moralist. His contemporaries knew him as a devotional writer, and a high-profile controversialist of the early 1640s. In church politics, he tended in fact to a middle way. Thomas Fuller
Thomas Fuller
wrote:He was commonly called our English Seneca, for the purenesse, plainnesse, and fulnesse of his style
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William Juxon
William Juxon
William Juxon
(1582 – 4 June 1663) was an English churchman, Bishop of London
London
from 1633 to 1649 and Archbishop of Canterbury
Archbishop of Canterbury
from 1660 until his death.[2]Contents1 Life1.1 Education 1.2 Ecclesiastical offices 1.3 Secular offices 1.4 Retirement and archbishopric2 Memorials 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksLife[edit] Education[edit] Juxon was the son of Robert Juxon and was born probably in Chichester, and educated at the local grammar school, The Prebendal School. He then went on to Merchant Taylors' School, London, and St John's College, Oxford, where he was elected to a scholarship in 1598. Ecclesiastical offices[edit] Juxon studied law at Oxford, but afterwards took holy orders, and in 1609 became vicar of St Giles' Church, Oxford, where he stayed until he became rector of Somerton, Oxfordshire in 1615
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Roger Maynwaring
Roger Maynwaring (Mainwaring, Manwaring) (1590–1653) was an English bishop, known for his support for absolutism.Contents1 Early life 2 Ecclesiastical offices 3 Political stance and controversies 4 Consequences4.1 Impeachment 4.2 Further developments5 NotesEarly life[edit] Maynwaring was born in Shropshire, and educated at Worcester
Worcester
grammar, and All Souls College, Oxford. He became rector of St Giles in the Fields in 1616.[1] Ecclesiastical offices[edit] Maynwaring was appointed a royal chaplain in 1626. He preached in favour of the royal prerogative at the time of the forced loan confrontation of 1627, speaking of the hazard of damnation of those who resisted the royal command, when it came to raising taxes, or forced loans, a burning topic at the time
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Christopher Potter
Christopher Potter
Christopher Potter
(1591 – 3 March 1646) was an English academic and clergyman, Provost of The Queen's College, Oxford, controversialist and prominent supporter of William Laud.Contents1 Life 2 Family 3 Notes 4 ReferencesLife[edit] He was born in Westmoreland, the nephew of Barnaby Potter. He matriculated at Queen's on 11 July 1606, aged 15, having entered the college in the previous Easter term. He was elected taberdar (pauper puer) on 29 October 1609. He graduated B.A. on 30 April 1610 and M.A. on 8 July 1613, became chaplain on 5 July 1613, and fellow on 22 March 1614-15. He was magister puerorum in 1620, and senior bursar in 1622; graduated B.D. and received a preacher's licence on 9 March 1621, and proceeded D.D. on 17 February 1627. He was in early life a follower of Henry Airay, opponent of Laud, and held a lectureship at Abingdon where he was a popular preacher
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John Oliver (Dean Of Worcester)
John Oliver (1601–1661) was an English royalist churchman, President of Magdalen College, Oxford, and Dean of Worcester. Life[edit] He was born in Kent, and matriculated from Merton College, Oxford, on 26 January 1616. He became a demy of Magdalen College on 7 April 1619, graduated B.A. on 11 December 1619, and became fellow in 1620. He also proceeded M.A. on 3 July 1622, B.D. on 18 May 1631, D.D. on 29 April 1639. He was tutor to Edward Hyde, when he was at Oxford, became vice-president of his college in 1634, held several livings and was made canon of Winchester
Winchester
in 1638, chaplain to William Laud
William Laud
in 1640. Laud left him one of his watches by his will. In 1643 he took refuge after the unsuccessful royalist rising near Tonbridge
Tonbridge
with Dr. Buckner, who had been a tutor at Magdalen. There he found Henry Hammond, who had a price on his head, and was escaping in disguise
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Philip Hawford
Philip Hawford alias Ballard (died August 11, 1557) was the parish priest (c.1536 – 1557) at Elmley Lovett, Worcestershire. He was also the last Abbot of Evesham and also Dean of Worcester.[1] Life[edit] Philip Hawford became Abbot of Evesham Abbey by preferment. He was in negotiations with Thomas Cromwell in 1536 telling Cromwell that he would 'Gladly accomplish' all the promises he had made and be always ready for "the call to preferment" promised him by Cromwell. Philip Hawford was called to preferment on April 4, 1538. Evidently he had bribed Cromwell for his preferment, for in May 1538 William Petre wrote to Thomas Wriothesley that 'touching Mr Cromwell's matter the abbot says it shall be paid to-morrow morning'
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Thomas Warmestry
The Very Rev Thomas Warmestry, DD (b1610 – d1665) was Dean of Worcester[1] from 1661 until his death. Warmestry educated at The King's School, Worcester[2] and Brasenose College, Oxford and was later Rector of Whitchurch
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