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Robert Le Diable (opera)
Robert le diable
Robert le diable
(Robert the Devil) is an opera in five acts composed by Giacomo Meyerbeer
Giacomo Meyerbeer
from a libretto written by Eugène Scribe
Eugène Scribe
and Germain Delavigne. Robert le diable
Robert le diable
is regarded as one of the first grand operas at the Paris Opéra
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Giacomo Meyerbeer
Giacomo Meyerbeer[n 1] (born Jacob Liebmann Beer; 5 September 1791 – 2 May 1864) was a German opera composer of Jewish
Jewish
birth who has been described as perhaps the most successful stage composer of the nineteenth century.[1] With his 1831 opera Robert le diable
Robert le diable
and its successors, he gave the genre of grand opera 'decisive character'.[2] Meyerbeer's grand opera style was achieved by his merging of German orchestra style with Italian vocal tradition. These were employed in the context of sensational and melodramatic libretti created by Eugène Scribe
Eugène Scribe
and were enhanced by the up-to-date theatre technology of the Paris Opéra
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Guillaume Tell
Guillaume Tell (English: William Tell, Italian: Guglielmo Tell) is a French-language opera in four acts by Italian composer Gioachino Rossini to a libretto by Victor-Joseph Étienne de Jouy
Victor-Joseph Étienne de Jouy
and L. F. Bis, based on Friedrich Schiller's play William Tell
William Tell
which drew on the William Tell
William Tell
legend. The opera was Rossini's last, although he lived for nearly 40 more years
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Normandy
Normandy (/ˈnɔːrməndi/; French: Normandie, pronounced [nɔʁmɑ̃di] ( listen), Norman: Normaundie, from Old French Normanz, plural of Normant, originally from the word for "northman" in several Scandinavian languages)[2] is one of the 18 regions of France, roughly corresponding to the historical Duchy of Normandy. Administratively, Normandy is divided into five départements: Calvados, Eure, Manche, Orne, and Seine-Maritime. It covers 30,627 square kilometres (11,825 sq mi),[3] comprising roughly 5% of the territory of metropolitan France. Its population of 3.37 million accounts for around 5% of the population of France. Normans is the name given to the inhabitants of Normandy,[1] and the region is the homeland of the Norman language. The historical region of Normandy comprised the present-day region of Normandy, as well as small areas now part of the départements of Mayenne and Sarthe
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William The Conqueror
William I[a] (c. 1028[1] – 9 September 1087), usually known as William the Conqueror
William the Conqueror
and sometimes William the Bastard,[2][b] was the first Norman King of England, reigning from 1066 until his death in 1087. A descendant of Rollo, he was Duke
Duke
of Normandy
Normandy
(as William II) from 1035 onward. After a long struggle to establish his power, by 1060 his hold on Normandy
Normandy
was secure, and he launched the Norman conquest of England
Norman conquest of England
six years later. The rest of his life was marked by struggles to consolidate his hold over England and his continental lands and by difficulties with his eldest son. William was the son of the unmarried Robert I, Duke
Duke
of Normandy, by Robert's mistress Herleva
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Devil
The Devil
Devil
(from Greek: διάβολος diábolos "slanderer, accuser")[1] is the personification and archetype of evil in various cultures.[2] Historically, the Devil
Devil
can be defined as the personification of thatever is perceived in society as evil and the depiction consist of its cultural traditions.[3] In Christianity, the manifestation of the Devil
Devil
is the Hebrew
Hebrew
Satan; the primary opponent of God.[4][5] While in Christiany, the Devil
Devil
was created by God, in Absolute dualism, the Devil
Devil
is alternatively seen as an independent principle besides the good God
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Carl Maria Von Weber
Carl Maria Friedrich Ernst von Weber (18 or 19 November 1786 – 5 June 1826)[1][2] was a German composer, conductor, pianist, guitarist[3] and critic, and was one of the first significant composers of the Romantic school. Weber's operas Der Freischütz, Euryanthe
Euryanthe
and Oberon greatly influenced the development of the Romantische Oper (Romantic opera) in Germany. Der Freischütz
Der Freischütz
came to be regarded as the first German "nationalist" opera, Euryanthe
Euryanthe
developed the Leitmotif
Leitmotif
technique to an unprecedented degree, while Oberon may have influenced Mendelssohn's music for A Midsummer Night's Dream and, at the same time, revealed Weber's lifelong interest in the music of non-Western cultures
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Der Freischütz
Der Freischütz, Op. 77, J. 277, (usually translated as The Marksman[1] or The Freeshooter[2]) is a German opera with spoken dialogue in three acts by Carl Maria von Weber
Carl Maria von Weber
with a libretto by Friedrich Kind. It premiered on 18 June 1821 at the Schauspielhaus Berlin
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Opéra Comique
The Opéra-Comique
Opéra-Comique
is a Parisian opera company, which was founded around 1714 by some of the popular theatres of the Parisian fairs. In 1762 the company was merged with, and for a time took the name of its chief rival the Comédie-Italienne
Comédie-Italienne
at the Hôtel de Bourgogne, and was also called the Théâtre-Italien up to about 1793, when it again became most commonly known as the Opéra-Comique. Today the company's official name is Théâtre national de l'Opéra-Comique, and its theatre, with a capacity of around 1,248 seats, sometimes referred to as the Salle Favart (the third on this site), is located in Place Boïeldieu, in the 2nd arrondissement of Paris, not far from the Palais Garnier, one of the theatres of the Paris Opéra
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Opéra-Comique
The Opéra-Comique
Opéra-Comique
is a Parisian opera company, which was founded around 1714 by some of the popular theatres of the Parisian fairs. In 1762 the company was merged with, and for a time took the name of its chief rival the Comédie-Italienne
Comédie-Italienne
at the Hôtel de Bourgogne, and was also called the Théâtre-Italien up to about 1793, when it again became most commonly known as the Opéra-Comique. Today the company's official name is Théâtre national de l'Opéra-Comique, and its theatre, with a capacity of around 1,248 seats, sometimes referred to as the Salle Favart (the third on this site), is located in Place Boïeldieu, in the 2nd arrondissement of Paris, not far from the Palais Garnier, one of the theatres of the Paris Opéra
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Daniel Auber
Daniel François Esprit Auber (French: [danjɛl fʁɑ̃swa ɛspʁi obɛːʁ]; 29 January 1782 – 12/13 May 1871) was a French composer.Contents1 Personal life 2 Career 3 Works 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksPersonal life[edit] The son of a Paris
Paris
print-seller, Auber was born in Caen
Caen
in Normandy. Though his father expected him to continue in the print-selling business, he also allowed his son to learn how to play several musical instruments. His first teacher was the Tirolean composer, Josef Alois Ladurner. At the age of 20 Auber was sent to London for business training, but he was obliged to leave England in 1804 when the Treaty of Amiens was breached.Daniel François Esprit AuberCareer[edit] Auber had already attempted musical composition, and at this period produced several concertos pour basse, modelled after the violoncellist Lamare, in whose name they were published
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La Muette De Portici
La muette de Portici
Portici
(The Dumb Girl of Portici, or The Mute Girl of Portici), also called Masaniello
Masaniello
(Italian pronunciation: [mazaˈnjɛllo]) in some versions,[1] is an opera in five acts by Daniel Auber, with a libretto by Germain Delavigne, revised by Eugène Scribe. The work has an important place in music history as the earliest French grand opera
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Recitative
Recitative (/ˌrɛsɪtəˈtiːv/, also known by its Italian name "recitativo" ([retʃitaˈtiːvo])) is a style of delivery (much used in operas, oratorios, and cantatas) in which a singer is allowed to adopt the rhythms of ordinary speech. Recitative does not repeat lines as formally composed songs do. It resembles sung ordinary speech more than a formal musical composition. Recitative can be distinguished on a continuum from more speech-like to more musical, with more sustained melodic lines
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Gioachino Rossini
Gioachino Antonio Rossini[1][2] (Italian: [dʒoaˈkiːno anˈtɔːnjo rosˈsiːni] ( listen); 29 February 1792 – 13 November 1868) was an Italian composer who wrote 39 operas as well as some sacred music, songs, chamber music, and piano pieces. He was a precocious composer of operas, and he made his debut at age 18 with La cambiale di matrimonio. His best-known operas include the Italian comedies The Barber of Seville
The Barber of Seville
(Il barbiere di Siviglia), The Italian Girl in Algiers (L'italiana in Algeri), and Cinderella
Cinderella
(La Cenerentola). He also wrote a string of serious operas in Italian, including works such as Tancredi, Otello, and Semiramide. The Thieving Magpie (La gazza ladra) features one of his most celebrated overtures. Rossini moved to Paris
Paris
in 1824 where he began to set French librettos to music
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Ballet Of The Nuns
Ballet of the Nuns
Ballet of the Nuns
is the first ballet blanc and the first romantic ballet.[1] It is an episode in Act 3 of Giacomo Meyerbeer's grand opera, Robert le diable. It was first performed in November 1831 at the Paris Opéra. The choreography (now lost) was created by either Filippo Taglioni
Filippo Taglioni
or Jean Coralli.[2] The short ballet tells of deceased nuns rising from their tombs in a ruined cloister. Their aim is to seduce the knight, Robert le Diable, into accepting a talisman to win him a princess. At the end of the ballet, the white-clad nuns return to their tombs. The ballet was created (in part) to demonstrate the building's newly installed gas lighting
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Henri Duponchel
Henri Duponchel
Henri Duponchel
(28 July 1794 – 8 April 1868)[1] was in turn a French architect, interior designer, costume designer, stage designer, stage director, managing director of the Paris Opera, and a silversmith. He has often been confused with Charles-Edmond Duponchel, a contemporary who also lived and worked in Paris.[2]Contents1 Early life and training as a painter 2 Architect and interior designer 3 Stage designer and director 4 Impresario 5 Gold and silver dealer and manufacturer 6 Later career 7 Honours 8 References 9 External linksEarly life and training as a painter[edit] He was born Henry Duponchel on the rue des Lombards in Paris to Pierre-Henry Duponchel (c. 1752 – 18 October 1821), who ran a grocery-hardware store, and Marie-Geneviève-Victoire Théronenne (d. 8 August 1842). The family subsequently moved to the rue Sainte-Croix de la Bretonnerie
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