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Robert III Of Worms
Robert III (800–834), also called Rutpert, was the Count of Worms and Rheingau
Rheingau
of a noble Frankish family called the Robertians. He was the son of Robert of Hesbaye. By his wife Waldrada d'Orleans he had his only verified son, Robert the Strong. They are also believed to be the parents of Odo I, Count of Troyes, and Guntram, Count of Wormsgau. His first cousin was Ermengard, wife of the Frankish emperor Louis the Pious. His cousin Chrodogang was Archbishop of Metz and abbot of the Lorsch Abbey. An uncle of Robert was Count Cancor, founder of Lorsch Abbey. Through Robert the Strong
Robert the Strong
he was grandfather of two kings of Western Francia, Odo and Robert
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Nobility
Nobility
Nobility
is a social class in aristocracy, normally ranked immediately under royalty, that possesses more acknowledged privileges and higher social status than most other classes in a society and with membership thereof typically being hereditary. The privileges associated with nobility may constitute substantial advantages over or relative to non-nobles, or may be largely honorary (e.g., precedence), and vary by country and era
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Lorsch Abbey
The Abbey of Lorsch
Lorsch
(German: Reichsabtei Lorsch; Latin: Laureshamense Monasterium, called also Laurissa and Lauresham) is a former Imperial abbey in Lorsch, Germany, about 10 km east of Worms. It was one of the most renowned monasteries of the Carolingian Empire. Even in its ruined state, its remains are among the most important pre-Romanesque–Carolingian style buildings in Germany. Its chronicle, entered in the Lorscher Codex compiled in the 1170s (now in the state archive at Würzburg) is a fundamental document for early medieval German history. Another famous document from the monastic library is the Codex Aureus of Lorsch
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Hundred Days
Coalition victory, Second Treaty of ParisEnd of Napoleonic Wars Second exile of Napoleon
Napoleon
and second Bourbon Restoration Beginning of the Concert of EuropeBelligerents United Kingdom  Prussia  Austrian Empire  Russian Empire  Kingdom of Hanover  Nassau  Duchy of Brunswick  Sweden  United Kingdom of the Netherlands  Spain  Portugal  Sardinia  Kingdom of Sicily Tuscany Switzerland French Kingdom France NaplesCommanders and leaders
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French Revolution
The French Revolution
Revolution
(French: Révolution française [ʁevɔlysjɔ̃ fʁɑ̃sɛːz]) was a period of far-reaching social and political upheaval in France
France
and its colonies that lasted from 1789 until 1799. It was partially carried forward by Napoleon
Napoleon
during the later expansion of the French Empire. The Revolution
Revolution
overthrew the monarchy, established a republic, catalyzed violent periods of political turmoil, and finally culminated in a dictatorship under Napoleon
Napoleon
who brought many of its principles to areas he conquered in Western Europe and beyond
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France
France
France
(French: [fʁɑ̃s]), officially the French Republic (French: République française [ʁepyblik fʁɑ̃sɛz]), is a country whose territory consists of metropolitan France
France
in western Europe, as well as several overseas regions and territories.[XIII] The metropolitan area of France
France
extends from the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the English Channel
English Channel
and the North Sea, and from the Rhine
Rhine
to the Atlantic Ocean. The overseas territories include French Guiana
French Guiana
in South America and several islands in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans
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Hugh Capet
Hugh Capet[a][b] (c. 941 – 24 October 996) was the first King of the Franks of the House of Capet
House of Capet
from his election in 987 until his death. He succeeded the last Carolingian
Carolingian
king, Louis V
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Robert I Of France
Robert I of France
Robert I of France
(866 – June 15, 923) was the elected King of West Francia from 922 to 923. Before his election to the throne he was Count of Poitiers, Count of Paris
Count of Paris
and Marquis of Neustria
Neustria
and Orléans. He succeeded the overthrown Carolingian
Carolingian
king Charles the Simple, who in 898 had succeeded Robert's brother, king Odo.Contents1 Life 2 King 3 Family 4 ReferencesLife[edit] Robert was born in 866 as the posthumous son of Robert the Strong, count of Anjou, and the brother of Odo, who was elected king of West Francia in 888.[1] In time West Francia
West Francia
evolved into the Kingdom of France;[2] and under Odo, the royal capital was fixed in Paris
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Odo Of France
Odo (or Eudes) (c. 859/860 – 1 January 898) was the elected King of Francia
Francia
from 888 to 898 as the first king from the Robertian dynasty. Before assuming the kingship Odo had the titles of Duke of the Franks and Count of Paris. Origins[edit] Odo was the eldest son of Robert the Strong, Duke of the Franks, Marquis of Neustria
Neustria
and Count of Anjou. After his father's death in 866, Odo inherited his Marquis of Neustria
Neustria
title. Odo lost this title in 868 when king Charles the Bald
Charles the Bald
appointed Hugh the Abbot to the title. Odo regained it following the death of Hugh in 886. After 882 he held the post of Count of Paris
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Western Francia
In medieval historiography, West Francia
Francia
(Latin: Francia
Francia
occidentalis) or the Kingdom of the West Franks
Franks
(regnum Francorum occidentalium) was the western part of Charlemagne's Empire, inhabited and ruled by the Germanic Franks
Franks
that forms the earliest stage of the Kingdom of France, lasting from about 840 until 987. West Francia
Francia
was formed out of the division of the Carolingian Empire
Carolingian Empire
in 843 under the Treaty of Verdun[1] after the death of Emperor Louis the Pious
Louis the Pious
and the east–west division which "gradually hardened into the establishment of separate kingdoms (...) of what we can begin to call Germany and France."[2] West Francia
Francia
extended further south than modern France, but it did not extend as far east
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Cancor
Cancor (d. 771), Count of Hesbaye, son of Robert I, Count of Hesbaye,[1] and his wife Williswinda. In 764, Cancor founded Lorsch Abbey together with his widowed mother Williswinda as a proprietary church and monastery on their estate, Laurissa (Lorsch).[2] They entrusted its government to Cancor's cousin Chrodegang, Archbishop of Metz, son of Cancor's aunt Landrada. Chrodegang dedicated the church and monastery to Saint Peter and became its first abbot. The founders enriched the new abbey later by further donations. In 766, Chrodegang resigned as Abbot of Lorsch owing to his other important duties as Archbishop of Metz. He then sent his brother Gundeland, another nephew of Cancor, to Lorsch as his successor. According to one source,[which?] Cancor was probably related to the Robertians
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Chrodegang Of Metz
Saint Chrodegang (Latin: Chrodogangus; German: Chrodegang, Hruotgang;[note 1] died 6 March 766 AD) was the Frankish Bishop of Metz from 742 or 748 until his death. He served as chancellor for his kinsman, Charles Martel. Chrodegang is claimed to be a progenitor of the Frankish dynasty of the Robertians.Contents1 Biography 2 Reform2.1 Rule of Chrodegang3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 Sources 7 External linksBiography[edit] He was born in the early eighth century at Hesbaye (Belgium, around the old Roman civitas of Tongeren) of a noble Frankish family,[3] possibly the son of Sigramnus, Count of Hesbaye, and Landrada, daughter of Lambert II, Count of Hesbaye. Landrada was the sister of Rotrude of Hesbaye, Charles Martel's first wife. He was educated first at the Benedictine monastery of Saint-Trond,[4] one of the oldest and most powerful abbeys in the Low Countries, and then at the cathedral school of Metz
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Louis The Pious
Louis the Pious
Louis the Pious
(778 – 20 June 840), also called the Fair, and the Debonaire,[1] was the King of the Franks
King of the Franks
and co-Emperor (as Louis I) with his father, Charlemagne, from 813. He was also King of Aquitaine from 781. As the only surviving adult son of Charlemagne
Charlemagne
and Hildegard, he became the sole ruler of the Franks after his father's death in 814, a position which he held until his death, save for the period 833–34, during which he was deposed. During his reign in Aquitaine, Louis was charged with the defence of the empire's southwestern frontier. He conquered Barcelona
Barcelona
from the Muslims
Muslims
in 801 and asserted Frankish authority over Pamplona
Pamplona
and the Basques
Basques
south of the Pyrenees
Pyrenees
in 812
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Ermengarde Of Hesbaye
Ermengarde (or Irmingard) of Hesbaye
Hesbaye
(c. 778 – 3 October 818), probably a member of the Robertian dynasty, was Holy Roman Empress from 813 and Queen of the Franks from 814 until her death as the wife of the Carolingian emperor Louis the Pious. Life[edit] Ermengarde was the daughter of Count Ingerman of Hesbaye
Hesbaye
and Rotrude. About 794 Ermengarde married Louis the Pious,[1] son of Charlemagne, who since 781 ruled as a King of Aquitaine. He had already fathered two children, and Ermengarde may have been his concubine. Ermengarde gave birth to six children: Lothair I
Lothair I
(795–855),[1] born in Altdorf, Bavaria Pepin I of Aquitaine
Pepin I of Aquitaine
(797–838)[1] Adelaide, born ca. 799 Rotrude, born about 800,[1] married Gerard, Count of Auvergne (c. 800 – d
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Odo I, Count Of Troyes
Odo (or Eudes) I (died 10 June 871) was the Count of Troyes from 852 to 859 and Count of Châteaudun through 871. His ancestry is not known for certain. Onomastics would place him in the extended family of Odo I, Count of Orléans. The most recent studies make him a son of Robert, Count of Oberrheingau and Wormsgau, and Waldrada, a daughter of Odo of Orléans. If this theory is true, he was the elder brother of Robert the Strong. Like the rest of his family, he was a loyal follower of Charles the Bald. Though well-endowed with estates in Austrasia, like his brother Robert, he abandoned these after the Treaty of Verdun (843) in order to rejoin Charles the Bald. In 846, he was granted lands in the region of Châteaudun, made Count of Anjou, and wed to Wandilmodis. In 852, after the death of Aleran, Count of Troyes, he was nominated to hold his vacant office and his brother Robert succeeded him in Anjou
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