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Robert Graves
Robert von Ranke Graves (24 July 1895 – 7 December 1985), also known as Robert Ranke Graves and most commonly Robert Graves,[1] was an English poet, historical novelist, critic, and classicist. His father was Alfred Perceval Graves, a celebrated Irish poet and figure in the Gaelic revival; they were both Celticists and students of Irish mythology. Graves produced more than 140 works. Graves's poems—together with his translations and innovative analysis and interpretations of the Greek myths; his memoir of his early life, including his role in World War I, Good-Bye to All That; and his speculative study of poetic inspiration, The White Goddess—have never been out of print.[2] He earned his living from writing, particularly popular historical novels such as I, Claudius, King Jesus, The Golden Fleece and Count Belisarius
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Sussex
Sussex
Sussex
(/ˈsʌsɪks/), from the Old English
Old English
Sūþsēaxe (South Saxons), is a historic county in South East England
South East England
corresponding roughly in area to the ancient Kingdom of Sussex. It is bounded to the west by Hampshire, north by Surrey, northeast by Kent, south by the English Channel, and divided for many purposes into the ceremonial counties of West Sussex
West Sussex
and East Sussex. Brighton and Hove, though part of East Sussex, was made a unitary authority in 1997, and as such, is administered independently of the rest of East Sussex. Brighton and Hove
Brighton and Hove
was granted City status in 2000. Until then, Chichester
Chichester
was Sussex's only city. Sussex
Sussex
has three main geographic sub-regions, each oriented approximately east to west
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Gaels
The Gaels
Gaels
(Irish pronunciation: [ɡeːlˠ], Scottish Gaelic pronunciation: [kɛː.əlˠ]; Irish: Na Gaeil, Scottish Gaelic: Na Gàidheil, Manx: Ny Gaeil) are an ethnolinguistic group native to northwestern Europe.[a] They are associated with the Gaelic languages: a branch of the Celtic languages
Celtic languages
comprising Irish, Manx and Scottish Gaelic. Historically, the ethnonyms Irish and Scots referred to the Gaels
Gaels
in general, but the scope of those nationalities is today more complex. Gaelic language
Gaelic language
and culture originated in Ireland, extending to Dál Riata in western Scotland. In antiquity the Gaels
Gaels
traded with the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
and also raided Roman Britain. In the Middle Ages, Gaelic culture became dominant throughout the rest of Scotland
Scotland
and the Isle of Man
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Copthorne Prep School
Copthorne is a village in the Mid Sussex
Mid Sussex
district of West Sussex, England. It lies close to Gatwick Airport, 25.5 miles (41 km) south of London, 21.5 miles (35 km) north of Brighton, and 36 miles (58 km) northeast of the county town of Chichester. Nearby towns include Crawley
Crawley
to the southwest and East Grinstead
East Grinstead
to the east. It is the most northerly ecclesiastical parish in the Diocese of Chichester
Chichester
in the Church of England, and together with Crawley
Crawley
Down makes up the civil parish of Worth.[2]Contents1 Etymology 2 History 3 St
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Municipal Borough Of Wimbledon
Wimbledon was a local government district in north-east Surrey from 1866 to 1965 covering the town of Wimbledon and its surrounding area. It was part of the London postal district and Metropolitan Police District. Wimbledon Local Government District was formed in 1866 when the parish of Wimbledon adopted the Local Government Act 1858, forming a local board of 15 members to govern the area.[1] The Local Government Act 1894 reconstituted the area as an urban district. The town was granted a charter of incorporation to become a municipal borough in 1905.[2] A borough council consisting of a mayor, six aldermen and eighteen councillors replaced the urban district council. The original Wimbledon Town Hall was built on The Broadway.[3] This was replaced by a new Town Hall on the corner of Queen's Road and Wimbledon Bridge in 1931. The borough was granted a coat of arms in 1906. The arms incorporated heraldic elements associated with the history of the borough through the centuries
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Rugby, Warwickshire
Rugby is a market town in Warwickshire, England, close to the River Avon. The town has a population of 70,628 (2011 census[1]) making it the second largest town in the county
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Classical Antiquity
Classical antiquity
Classical antiquity
(also the classical era, classical period or classical age) is the long period of cultural history centered on the Mediterranean
Mediterranean
Sea, comprising the interlocking civilizations of ancient Greece and ancient Rome, collectively known as the Greco-Roman world. It is the period in which Greek and Roman society flourished and wielded great influence throughout Europe, North Africa
North Africa
and Western Asia. Conventionally, it is taken to begin with the earliest-recorded Epic Greek poetry of Homer
Homer
(8th–7th century BC), and continues through the emergence of Christianity
Christianity
and the decline of the Roman Empire (5th century AD)
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London
London
London
(/ˈlʌndən/ ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city of England
England
and the United Kingdom.[7][8] Standing on the River Thames
River Thames
in the south east of the island of Great Britain, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. It was founded by the Romans, who named it Londinium.[9] London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its 1.12-square-mile (2.9 km2) medieval boundaries
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Irish People
Irish Travellers, Anglo-Irish, Bretons, Cornish, English, Icelanders,[12] Manx, Norse, Scots, Ulster
Ulster
Scots, Welsh Other Northern European
Northern European
ethnic groups* Around 800,000 people born in
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Classification Of Pneumonia
Pneumonia can be classified in several ways, most commonly by where it was acquired (hospital versus community), but may also by the area of lung affected or by the causative organism.[1] There is also a combined clinical classification, which combines factors such as age, risk factors for certain microorganisms, the presence of underlying lung disease or systemic disease, and whether the person has recently been hospitalized.Contents1 By location acquired1.1 Community-acquired 1.2 Hospital-acquired2 By cause2.1 Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia 2.2 Chemical pneumonia 2.3 Aspiration pneumonia 2.4 Dust pneumonia 2.5 Necrotizing pneumonia 2.6 Opportunistic pneumonia 2.7 Double pneumonia (bilateral pneumonia) 2.8 Severe acute respiratory syndrome3 By area of lung affected 4 Clinical 5 ReferencesBy location acquired[edit] Community-acquired[edit] Main article: Community-acquired pneumonia Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is inf
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Irish Mythology
The mythology of pre-Christian Ireland
Ireland
did not entirely survive the conversion to Christianity. However, much of it was preserved in medieval Irish literature, though it was shorn of its religious meanings. This literature represents the most extensive and best preserved of all the branches of Celtic mythology. Although many of the manuscripts have not survived and much more material was probably never committed to writing, there is enough remaining to enable the identification of distinct, if overlapping, cycles: the Mythological Cycle, the Ulster
Ulster
Cycle, the Fenian Cycle
Fenian Cycle
and the Historical Cycle. There are also a number of extant mythological texts that do not fit into any of the cycles
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Measles
Measles
Measles
is a highly contagious infectious disease caused by the measles virus.[3][9] Symptoms usually develop 10–12 days after exposure to an infected person and last 7–10 days.[6][7] Initial symptoms typically include fever, often greater than 40 °C (104.0 °F), cough, runny nose, and inflamed eyes.[3][4] Small white spots known as Koplik's spots
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1918 Flu Pandemic
The 1918 flu pandemic
1918 flu pandemic
(January 1918 – December 1920) was an unusually deadly influenza pandemic, the first of the two pandemics involving H1N1
H1N1
influenza virus.[1] It infected 500 million people around the world,[2] including people on remote Pacific islands and in the Arctic, and resulted in the deaths of 50 to 100 million (three to five percent of the world's population),[3] making it one of the deadliest natural disasters in human history.[4][5][6] Disease had already greatly limited life expectancy in the early 20th century
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Demobilization
Demobilization
Demobilization
or demobilisation (see spelling differences) is the process of standing down a nation's armed forces from combat-ready status. This may be as a result of victory in war, or because a crisis has been peacefully resolved and military force will not be necessary. The opposite of demobilization is mobilization. Forceful demobilization of a defeated enemy is called demilitarization. In the final days of World War
War
II, for example, the United States Armed Forces developed a demobilization plan which would discharge soldiers on the basis of a point system that favoured length and certain types of service
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Second World War
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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Special Constabulary
The Special
Special
Constabulary is the part-time volunteer section of statutory police forces in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and some Crown dependencies. Its officers are known as special constables (all hold the office of constable no matter what their grade) or informally as specials. Every United Kingdom
United Kingdom
territorial police force has a special constabulary except the Police
Police
Service of Northern Ireland, which has a Reserve constituted on different grounds. However, the Royal Ulster Constabulary (and the previous Royal Irish Constabulary) did have its own Ulster Special Constabulary
Ulster Special Constabulary
from 1920 until 1970, when the Reserve was formed. The British Transport Police
Police
(a national "special police force") also has a special constabulary
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