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Robert Fortune
Robert Fortune (16 September 1812 – 13 April 1880)[1][2] was a Scottish botanist, plant hunter and traveller, best known for stealing tea plants from China
China
on behalf of the British East India
India
Company.Contents1 Life 2 Legacy 3 Plants named after Robert Fortune 4 Publications 5 Biographies 6 References 7 External linksLife[edit] Fortune was born at Kelloe, Berwickshire. He was employed in the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh, and later in the Horticultural Society of London's garden at Chiswick. As a result of his mission success, the British gained a large profit and they were able to manufacture tea throughout the world.[3] Following the Treaty of Nanjing
Treaty of Nanjing
in 1842, Fortune was sent out by the Horticultural Society to collect plants in China. His travels resulted in the introduction to Europe of many new, exotic, beautiful flowers and plants
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Berwickshire
Berwickshire
Berwickshire
is a historic county, registration county and lieutenancy area in the Scottish Borders. It takes its name from Berwick-upon-Tweed, which was part of Scotland
Scotland
at the time of the county's formation, but became part of England
England
in 1482. Formerly the county was often called "the Merse", from Old English mǣres, "border"
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Rhododendron Fortunei
Rhododendron fortunei (Chinese: 云锦杜鹃; pinyin: yúnjǐn dùjuān) is a rhododendron species native to China, where it grows at altitudes of 600–2,000 meters (2,000–6,600 ft). It is a shrub or small tree that grows to 3–12 metres (9.8–39.4 ft) in height, with leathery leaves that are oblong to oblong-elliptic, 8–14.5 cm (3 1⁄8–5 3⁄4 in) by 3–9.2 cm (1 3⁄16–3 5⁄8 in) in size. It blooms from April to May, with trusses of 6–12 flowers, campanulate, white to pink, and fragrant. Synonyms[edit]None recorded.References[edit]"Rhododendron fortunei", Lindley, Gard. Chron. 1859: 868. 1859. "More Information: Rhododendron fortunei ssp. fortunei". The American Rhododendron Society.  "More Information: Rhododendron fortunei ssp. discolor". The American Rhododendron Society.  The Plant List "Rhododendron fortunei". Flora of China
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Rosa Banksiae
Rosa banksiae, common names Lady Banks' rose, or just Banks' rose, is a species of flowering plant in the rose family, native to central and western China, in the provinces of Gansu, Guizhou, Henan, Hubei, Jiangsu, Sichuan and Yunnan, at altitudes of 500–2,200 m (1,640–7,218 ft).[2]Contents1 Description 2 Varieties 3 Cultivation and uses 4 ReferencesDescription[edit] It is a scrambling shrubby vine growing vigorously to 6 m (20 ft) tall. Unlike most roses, it is practically thornless, though it may bear some prickles up to 5 mm long, particularly on stout, strong shoots. The leaves are evergreen, 4–6 cm long, with three to five (rarely seven) leaflets 2–5 cm long with a serrated margin. The flowers are small, 1.5–2.5 cm diameter, white or pale yellow
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England
England
England
is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.[6][7][8] It shares land borders with Scotland
Scotland
to the north and Wales
Wales
to the west. The Irish Sea
Irish Sea
lies northwest of England
England
and the Celtic Sea
Celtic Sea
lies to the southwest. England
England
is separated from continental Europe
Europe
by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel
English Channel
to the south
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Rootstock
A rootstock is part of a plant, often an underground part, from which new above-ground growth can be produced. It can refer to a rhizome or underground stem.[1] In grafting, it refers to a plant, sometimes just a stump, which already has an established, healthy root system, onto which a cutting or a bud from another plant is grafted. In some cases, such as vines of grapes and other berries, cuttings may be used for rootstocks, the roots being established in nursery conditions before planting them out. The plant part grafted onto the rootstock is usually called the scion. The scion is the plant that has the properties that propagator desires above ground, including the photosynthetic activity and the fruit or decorative properties. The rootstock is selected for its interaction with the soil, providing the roots and the stem to support the new plant, obtaining the necessary soil water and minerals, and resisting the relevant pests and diseases
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Latin)
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London
London
London
(/ˈlʌndən/ ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city of England
England
and the United Kingdom.[7][8] Standing on the River Thames
River Thames
in the south east of the island of Great Britain, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. It was founded by the Romans, who named it Londinium.[9] London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its 1.12-square-mile (2.9 km2) medieval boundaries
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Cephalotaxus Fortunei
Cephalotaxus
Cephalotaxus
fortunei, commonly called the Chinese plum-yew,[2] Fortune's yew plum,[1] simply plum yew, Chinese cowtail pine or in Chinese as san jian shan (Chinese: 三尖杉; pinyin: sǎnjiānshān), is a coniferous shrub or small tree in the plum yew family. It is native to northern Burma
Burma
and China, but is sometimes grown in western gardens where it has been in cultivation since 1848. Description[edit] Cephalotaxus
Cephalotaxus
fortunei is a shrub or small tree growing to as high as 20 m with a diameter at breast height of about 20 cm. They are usually multi-stemmed with an open and loosely rounded crown.[3] In cultivation they tend to grow on a single stem that is often leaning and bare towards the bottom, but with dense foliage on the upper half.[4] They have reddish brown bark that appears purplish in places with rough square scales and long shreds peeling off
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Hosta Fortunei
Hosta
Hosta
'Undulata' is a cultivar of the genus Hosta, widely cultivated as ornamental plants in borders or as specimen plants. It was formerly regarded as a species[1] under the name Hosta
Hosta
undulata (Otto & A.Dietr.) L.H.Bailey. It is not accepted as a species by the World Checklist of Selected Plant Families as of August 2011[update],[2] and has been relegated to cultivar status by Schmid.[3] Inexpensive and easy to grow in any zone which experiences winter, H. 'Undulata' and its related cultivars are the most common hostas found in the United States. Garden performance is best in partial to moderate shade, in well-drained moist soil. Hostas in the 'Undulata' group include an all-green cultivar, 'Undulata Erromena'; a white-edged cultivar, 'Undulata Albomarginata'; and white-centered (medio-variegated) cultivars that may be grouped according to the amount of white in the leaf
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Mahonia Fortunei
Berberis fortunei Lindl.Mahonia fortunei is a species of shrubs in the family Berberidaceae, the barberry family, described as a species in 1846.[2][3] It is endemic to China, found in the provinces of Chongqing, Guangxi, Guizhou, Hubei, Hunan, Jiangxi, Sichuan, Taiwan, and Zhejiang.[1][4] It is grown as an ornamental in many lands, with common names including Chinese mahonia, Fortune's mahonia, and holly grape.[5] Some authorities place the genus Mahonia in Berberis because there is no definite morphological distinction between the two genera. The subject awaits in-depth genetic analysis.[6]Contents1 Description 2 Chemistry 3 Cultivation 4 ReferencesDescription[edit] This is an evergreen shrub that usually grows up to 2 meters tall, but sometimes reaches 4 meters. It is upright, spreading, and somewhat rounded. It has a slow to moderate rate of growth and a moderate density
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John Murray (publisher)
John Murray is a British publisher, known for the authors it has published in its history, including Jane Austen, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Lord Byron, Charles Lyell, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Herman Melville, Edward Whymper, and Charles Darwin
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Azalea
Azaleas /əˈzeɪliə/ are flowering shrubs in the genus Rhododendron, particularly the former sections Tsutsuji
Tsutsuji
(evergreen) and Pentanthera (deciduous). Azaleas bloom in spring, their flowers often lasting several weeks
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Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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