HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Robert E. Howard
Robert Ervin Howard (January 22, 1906 – June 11, 1936) was an American author who wrote pulp fiction in a diverse range of genres. He is well known for his character Conan the Barbarian
Conan the Barbarian
and is regarded as the father of the sword and sorcery subgenre. Howard was born and raised in Texas. He spent most of his life in the town of Cross Plains, with some time spent in nearby Brownwood. A bookish and intellectual child, he was also a fan of boxing and spent some time in his late teens bodybuilding, eventually taking up amateur boxing. From the age of nine he dreamed of becoming a writer of adventure fiction but did not have real success until he was 23. Thereafter, until his death by suicide at age 30, Howard's writings were published in a wide selection of magazines, journals, and newspapers, and he became proficient in several subgenres
[...More...]

"Robert E. Howard" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Picts
The Picts
Picts
was the name given to an unidentified tribal confederation of peoples who lived in what is today eastern and northern Scotland during the Late Iron Age
Iron Age
and Early Medieval periods. They are thought to have been ethnolinguistically Celtic. Where they lived and what their culture was like can be inferred from the geographical distribution of brochs, Brittonic place name elements, and Pictish stones. The name Picts
Picts
appears in written records from Late Antiquity to the 10th century, when they are thought to have merged with the Gaels
[...More...]

"Picts" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Jack Johnson (boxer)
John Arthur Johnson (March 31, 1878 – June 10, 1946), nicknamed the Galveston Giant, was an American boxer who, at the height of the Jim Crow era, became the first African American
African American
world heavyweight boxing champion (1908–1915)
[...More...]

"Jack Johnson (boxer)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Wichita Falls, Texas
Wichita Falls (/ˈwɪtʃɪtɔː/ WITCH-i-taw) is a city in and the county seat of Wichita County, Texas, United States.[5] It is the principal city of the Wichita Falls Metropolitan Statistical Area, which encompasses all of Archer, Clay, and Wichita Counties. According to the 2010 census, it had a population of 104,553, making it the 35th-most populous city in Texas
[...More...]

"Wichita Falls, Texas" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bagwell, Texas
Bagwell is an unincorporated community in Red River County, Texas, United States. Although it is unincorporated, Bagwell has a post office, with the ZIP code of 75412.[1] References[edit]^ Zip Code LookupExternal links[edit]U.S
[...More...]

"Bagwell, Texas" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Burkett, Texas
Burkett is an unincorporated community in Coleman County, Texas, United States. Although it is unincorporated, Burkett has a post office, with the ZIP code of 76828.[1] Climate[edit] The climate in this area is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen climate classification system, Burkett has a humid subtropical climate, Cfa on climate maps.[2] References[edit]^ Zip Code Lookup Archived June 15, 2011, at the Wayback Machine. ^ Climate Summary for Burkett, TexasExternal links[edit]U.S
[...More...]

"Burkett, Texas" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Oil Boom
An oil boom is a period of large inflow of income as a result of high global oil prices or large oil production in an economy. Generally, this short period initially brings economic benefits, in terms of increased GDP growth, but might later lead to a resource curse.Contents1 Consequences 2 History 3 See also 4 ReferencesConsequences[edit] According to the Dutch disease theory, the sudden discovery of oil may cause a decline in the manufacturing sector
[...More...]

"Oil Boom" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lynchings
Lynching
Lynching
is an extrajudicial punishment by an informal group[citation needed]. It is most often used to characterize informal public executions by a mob in order to punish an alleged transgressor, or to intimidate a group. It is an extreme form of informal group social control such as charivari, skimmington, riding the rail, and tarring and feathering, but with a drift towards the display of a public spectacle. It is to be considered an act of terrorism and punishable by law.[1][2] Instances of it can be found in societies long antedating European settlement of North America.[3][4][5] In the United States, lynchings became frequent in the South during the period after the Reconstruction era and especially around the decades on either side of the turn of the 20th century
[...More...]

"Lynchings" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Feuds
A feud /fjuːd/, referred to in more extreme cases as a blood feud, vendetta, faida, beef, clan war, gang war, or private war, is a long-running argument or fight, often between social groups of people, especially families or clans. Feuds begin because one party (correctly or incorrectly) perceives itself to have been attacked, insulted or wronged by another. Intense feelings of resentment trigger the initial retribution, which causes the other party to feel equally aggrieved and vengeful. The dispute is subsequently fuelled by a long-running cycle of retaliatory violence. This continual cycle of provocation and retaliation makes it extremely difficult to end the feud peacefully. Feuds frequently involve the original parties' family members and/or associates, can last for generations, and may result in extreme acts of violence
[...More...]

"Feuds" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Native Americans In The United States
American Indian and Alaska
Alaska
Native (2010 Census Bureau)[1] One race: 2,932,248 are registered In combination with one or more of the other races listed: 2,288,331 Total: 5,220,579 ~ 1.6% of the total U.S
[...More...]

"Native Americans In The United States" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hardboiled
Hardboiled
Hardboiled
(or hard-boiled) fiction is a literary genre that shares some of its characters and settings with crime fiction (especially detective stories). The genre's typical protagonist is a detective who witnesses the violence of organized crime that flourished during Prohibition (1920–1933) and its aftermath, while dealing with a legal system that has become as corrupt as the organized crime itself.[1] Rendered cynical by this cycle of violence, the detectives of hardboiled fiction are often antiheroes. Notable hardboiled detectives include Philip Marlowe, Mike Hammer, Sam Spade, Lew Archer, and The Continental Op.Contents1 The genre's pioneers 2 Pulp fiction 3 See also 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksThe genre's pioneers[edit] The style was pioneered by Carroll John Daly in the mid-1920s,[2] popularized by Dashiell Hammett
Dashiell Hammett
over the course of the decade, and refined by
[...More...]

"Hardboiled" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

James J. Jeffries
James Jackson Jeffries (April 15, 1875 – March 3, 1953) was an American professional boxer and World Heavyweight
Heavyweight
Champion. He was known for his enormous strength and stamina. Using a technique taught to him by his trainer, former Welterweight and Middleweight Champion Tommy Ryan, Jeffries fought out of a crouch with his left arm extended forward. He was able to absorb tremendous punishment while wearing his opponents down. A natural left-hander, he possessed one-punch knockout power in his left hook, and brawled his way to the top of the rankings. He is perhaps most famous for being America's "Great White Hope", since the nation expected him to come out of his retirement to beat the African-American boxer Jack Johnson, who was at the time the Heavyweight
Heavyweight
Champion.[1] Jeffries stood 6 ft 1 1⁄2 in (1.87 m) tall and weighed 225 pounds (102 kg) in his prime
[...More...]

"James J. Jeffries" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bob Fitzsimmons
Robert James Fitzsimmons (26 May 1863 – 22 October 1917) was a British professional boxer who made boxing history as the sport's first three-division world champion.[1][2] He also achieved fame for beating Gentleman Jim Corbett, (the man who beat John L. Sullivan), and he is in The Guinness Book of World Records
The Guinness Book of World Records
as the lightest heavyweight champion.[3] Nicknamed "Ruby Robert" and "The Freckled Wonder", he took pride in his lack of scars and appeared in the ring wearing heavy woollen underwear to conceal the disparity between his trunk and leg-development. He was also known for his pure fighting skills due to dislike of training for fights, which cost him at times in his career.[citation needed] Considered one of the hardest punchers in boxing history, Fitzsimmons is ranked as No
[...More...]

"Bob Fitzsimmons" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Jack Dempsey
William Harrison "Jack" Dempsey (June 24, 1895 – May 31, 1983), nicknamed "Kid Blackie" and "The Manassa Mauler", was an American professional boxer who competed from 1914 to 1927, and reigned as the world heavyweight champion from 1919 to 1926. A cultural icon of the 1920s,[1] Dempsey's aggressive fighting style and exceptional punching power made him one of the most popular boxers in history.[2][3] Many of his fights set financial and attendance records, including the first million-dollar gate
[...More...]

"Jack Dempsey" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Arabs
Historically: Arabian mythology (Hubal · al-Lāt · Al-‘Uzzá · Manāt · Other Goddesses) Predominantly: Islam (Sunni · Shia · Sufi · Ibadi · Alawite · Ismaili) Sizable minority: Christianity (Eastern Orthodox · Maronite · Coptic Orthodox · Greek Orthodox · Greek Catholic · Chaldean Christian) Smaller minority: Other monotheistic religions (Druze · Bahá'í Faith · Sabianism · Bábism · Mandaeism)Related ethnic groupsOther Afroasiatic-speaking peoplesa Arab
Arab
ethnicity should not be confused with non- Arab
Arab
ethnicities that are also native to the Arab
Arab
world.[30] b Not all Arabs
Arabs
are Muslims
Muslims
and not all Muslims
Muslims
are Arabs
[...More...]

"Arabs" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.