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Rob Roy (novel)
Rob Roy (1817) is a historical novel by Walter Scott. It is narrated by Frank Osbaldistone, the son of an English merchant who travels first to the North of England, and subsequently to the Scottish Highlands, to collect a debt stolen from his father
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Dalziel Brothers
The Brothers Dalziel
Brothers Dalziel
was a prolific engraving business in Victorian London, founded in 1839 by George Dalziel (1 December 1815 – August 1902), with his brother Edward Dalziel (1817–1905) from 1840.[1] They were later joined by their sister Margaret (1819–1894), brother John (1822–1869), and brother Thomas Dalziel (1823–1906).[1] Along with at least three older brothers and one younger, they were children of the artist Alexander Dalziel of Wooler
Wooler
in Northumberland,[2][3] George Dalziel trained under Charles Gray (wood engraver)[3] in London from around 1835.[citation needed] The Dalziel brothers worked with many important Victorian artists, producing illustrations for the burgeoning magazine and book market of the period
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Cavalier
The term Cavalier
Cavalier
(/ˌkævəˈlɪər/) was first used by Roundheads as a term of abuse for the wealthier Royalist supporters of King Charles I and his son Charles II of England
Charles II of England
during the English Civil War, the Interregnum, and the Restoration (1642 – c. 1679). It was later adopted by the Royalists themselves. Although it referred originally to political and social attitudes and behaviour, of which clothing was a very small part, it has subsequently become strongly identified with the fashionable clothing of the court at the time
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Lord Byron
George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron
Baron Byron
FRS (22 January 1788 – 19 April 1824), known as Lord Byron, was an English nobleman, poet, peer, politician, and leading figure in the Romantic movement. He is regarded as one of the greatest British poets[1] and remains widely read and influential
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Amazons
In Greek mythology, the Amazons
Amazons
(Greek: Ἀμαζόνες, Amazónes, singular Ἀμαζών, Amazōn) were a tribe of women warriors related to Scythians
Scythians
and Sarmatians. Apollonius Rhodius, at Argonautica, mentions that Amazons
Amazons
were the daughters of Ares
Ares
and Harmonia (a nymph of the Akmonian Wood)
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Childe Harold's Pilgrimage
Childe Harold's Pilgrimage is a lengthy narrative poem in four parts written by Lord Byron. It was published between 1812 and 1818 and is dedicated to "Ianthe". The poem describes the travels and reflections of a world-weary young man who, disillusioned with a life of pleasure and revelry, looks for distraction in foreign lands. In a wider sense, it is an expression of the melancholy and disillusionment felt by a generation weary of the wars of the post-Revolutionary and Napoleonic eras
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Guerrilla
Guerrilla warfare
Guerrilla warfare
is a form of irregular warfare in which a small group of combatants, such as paramilitary personnel, armed civilians, or irregulars, use military tactics including ambushes, sabotage, raids, petty warfare, hit-and-run tactics, and mobility to fight a larger and less-mobile traditional military.[1] Guerrilla groups are a type of violent non-state actor.Contents1 Etymology 2 Strategy, tactics and methods2.1 Strategy 2.2 Tactics 2.3 Unconventional methods 2.4 Growth during the 20th century3 History 4 Counter-guerrilla warfare4.1 Scholarship4.1.1 Classic guidelines 4.1.2 Variants5 Foco
Foco
theory 6 Relationship to terrorism 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksEtymology[edit] The Spanish word "guerrilla" is the diminutive form of "guerra" ("war")
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Peninsular War
French Empire Bonapartist Spain Confederation of the Rhine Napoleonic Italy Duchy of WarsawCommanders and leaders Arthur Wellesley William Beresford Rowland Hill John Moore † Francisco Castaños Juan Martín Díez José Palafox Gregorio de la Cuesta Miguel Álava Esquivel Joaquín Blake Bernardino Freire † Francisco da Silveira Napoleon
Napoleon
I Joseph I Joachim Murat Jean-Andoche Junot Jean de Dieu Soult André Masséna Michel Ney Louis Gabriel Suchet Jean Lannes Joseph Mortier Auguste de Marmont Jean-Baptiste Bessières Jean-Baptiste Jourd
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Jacobite Risings
The Jacobite risings, also known as the Jacobite rebellions or the War of the British Succession,[1] were a series of uprisings, rebellions, and wars in Great Britain
Great Britain
and Ireland occurring between 1688 and 1746. The uprisings had the aim of returning James II of England
James II of England
and VII of Scotland, the last Catholic British monarch, and later his descendants of the House of Stuart, to the throne of Great Britain
Great Britain
after they had been deposed by Parliament during the Glorious Revolution
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City Of London
The City of London
London
is a city and county that contains the historic centre and the primary central business district (CBD) of London. It constituted most of London
London
from its settlement by the Romans in the 1st century AD to the Middle Ages, but the agglomeration has since grown far beyond the City's borders.[3][4] The City is now only a tiny part of the metropolis of London, though it remains a notable part of central London. Administratively, it forms one of the 33 local authority districts of Greater London; however, the City of London
London
is not a London
London
borough, a status reserved for the other 32 districts (including London's only other city, the City of Westminster)
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Northumberland
Northumberland
Northumberland
(/nɔːrˈθʌmbərlənd/;[2] abbreviated Northd) is a county in North East England. The northernmost county of England, it borders Cumbria
Cumbria
to the west, County Durham
County Durham
and Tyne and Wear
Tyne and Wear
to the south and the Scottish Borders
Scottish Borders
to the north
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Highwayman
A highwayman was a robber who stole from travellers. This type of thief usually traveled and robbed by horse as compared to a footpad who travelled and robbed on foot; mounted highwaymen were widely considered to be socially superior to footpads.[1] Such robbers operated in Great Britain
Great Britain
from the Elizabethan era
Elizabethan era
until the early 19th century. In many other countries, they persisted for a few decades longer, until the mid or late 19th century. The word highwayman is first known to have been used in the year 1617;[2] other euphemisms included "knights of the road" and "gentlemen of the road"
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Justice Of The Peace
A justice of the peace (JP) is a judicial officer, of a lower or puisne court, elected or appointed by means of a commission (letters patent) to keep the peace. In past centuries the term commissioner of the peace was often used with the same meaning. Depending on the jurisdiction, such justices dispense summary justice or merely deal with local administrative applications in common law jurisdictions. Justices of the peace are appointed or elected from the citizens of the jurisdiction in which they serve, and are (or were) usually not required to have any formal legal education in order to qualify for the office
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William Wordsworth
William Wordsworth
William Wordsworth
(7 April 1770 – 23 April 1850) was a major English Romantic poet who, with Samuel Taylor Coleridge, helped to launch the Romantic Age in English literature
English literature
with their joint publication Lyrical Ballads
Lyrical Ballads
(1798). Wordsworth's magnum opus is generally considered to be The Prelude, a semi-autobiographical poem of his early years that he revised and expanded a number of times
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Kirk
The Kirk
Kirk
is a Scottish and Northern English word meaning a church, or more specifically, the Church of Scotland. Many place names and personal names are derived from it.Contents1 Basic meaning and etymology 2 Church of Scotland 3 Free Kirk 4 High Kirk 5 Kirk
Kirk
Session 6 Kirking ceremonies 7 Place names 8 Personal names 9 See also 10 ReferencesBasic meaning and etymology[edit] As a common noun, kirk (meaning 'church') is found in Scots, Scottish English, Ulster-Scots and some English dialects,[1] attested as a noun from the 14th century onwards, but as an element in placenames much earlier. Both words, kirk and church, derive from the Koine Greek κυριακόν (δωμα) (kyriakon (dōma)) meaning Lord's (house), which was borrowed into the Germanic languages
Germanic languages
in late antiquity, possibly in the course of the Gothic missions
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Tolbooth
A tolbooth or town house was the main municipal building of a Scottish burgh, from medieval times until the 19th century. The tolbooth usually provided a council meeting chamber, a court house and a jail. The tolbooth was one of three essential features in a Scottish burgh, along with the mercat cross and the kirk (church).Contents1 Etymology 2 History 3 Tolbooths 4 See also 5 ReferencesEtymology[edit] The word tolbooth is derived from the Middle English
Middle English
word tolbothe that described a town hall containing customs offices and prison cells.[1] History[edit] Burghs were created in Scotland
Scotland
from the 12th century. They had the right to hold markets and levy customs and tolls, and tolbooths were originally established for collection of these.[2] Royal burghs were governed by an elected council, led by a provost and baillies, who also acted as magistrates with jurisdiction over local crime
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