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Rinpungpa
Rinpungpa
Rinpungpa
(Tibetan: ཪིན་སྤུངས་པ་, Wylie: rin spungs pa, Lhasa
Lhasa
dialect IPA: rĩ̀púŋpə́) was a Tibetan regime that dominated much of Western Tibet
Tibet
and part of Ü-Tsang between 1435 and 1565. During one period around 1500 the Rinpungpa lords came close to assemble the Tibetan lands around the Yarlung Tsangpo River under one authority, but their powers receded after 1512.Contents1 Rise to power 2 Confrontation and invasion 3 Height of political authority 4 Setbacks in the east 5 External threats and fall from power 6 Legacy 7 List of rulers 8 See also 9 References9.1 Citations 9.2 SourcesRise to power[edit] The Rinpungpa
Rinpungpa
belonged to the Ger (Wylie: sger) clan, which is traced back to the days of the Tibetan Empire
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Tibetan Alphabet
Egyptian hieroglyphs
Egyptian hieroglyphs
32 c. BCE Hieratic
Hieratic
32 c. BCEDemotic 7 c. BCEMeroitic 3 c. BCEProto-Sinaitic 19 c. BCEUgaritic 15 c. BCE Epigraphic South Arabian 9 c. BCEGe’ez 5–6 c. BCEPhoenician 12 c. BCEPaleo-Hebrew 10 c. BCESamaritan 6 c. BCE Libyco-Berber
Libyco-Berber
3 c. BCETifinaghPaleohispanic (semi-syllabic) 7 c. BCE Aramaic 8 c. BCE Kharoṣṭhī
Kharoṣṭhī
4 c. BCE Brāhmī 4 c. BCE Brahmic family
Brahmic family
(see)E.g. Tibetan 7 c. CE Devanagari
Devanagari
13 c. CECanadian syllabics 1840Hebrew 3 c. BCE Pahlavi 3 c. BCEAvestan 4 c. CEPalmyrene 2 c. BCE Syriac 2 c. BCENabataean 2 c. BCEArabic 4 c. CEN'Ko 1949 CESogdian 2 c. BCEOrkhon (old Turkic) 6 c. CEOld Hungarian c. 650 CEOld UyghurMongolian 1204 CEMandaic 2 c. CEGreek 8 c. BCEEtruscan 8 c. BCELatin 7 c
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Jamyang Shakya Gyaltsen
Jamyang Shakya Gyaltsen (Tibetan: འཇམ་དབྱངས་ཤ་ཀྱ་རྒྱལ་མཚན, Wylie: aJam dbyangs sha kya rgyal mts'an, 1340–1373) was a ruler of Central Tibet in 1364–1373. He was a member of the Phagmodrupa Dynasty which was the major Tibetan power from 1354 to 1435. His time was one of political stability in Central Tibet, and the establishment of amicable relations with the Ming dynasty of China.Contents1 Youth and ascent to power 2 Relations with the Yuan and the Ming 3 End of the reign 4 See also 5 Footnotes 6 Further referencesYouth and ascent to power[edit] Jamyang Shakya Gyaltsen was the eldest son of Sonam Zangpo, a brother of the founder of the Phagmodrupa regime, Tai Situ Changchub Gyaltsen. His mother was Damo Nyetuma. When nine years of age he was made a monastic novice. In 1352 he was elevated to boy-abbot of the see of Tsethang
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Shigatse
Shigatse, officially known as Xigazê[1][2] (Chinese: 日喀则; pinyin: Rìkāzé Nepali: सिगात्से), is a prefecture-level city of the Tibet Autonomous Region of China, with an area of 182,000 km2 (70,271 sq mi). It is located within the historical Tsang province of Tibet.Contents1 Overview 2 Transport2.1 Rail 2.2 Air 2.3 Road3 Counties 4 Climate 5 Gallery 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksOverview[edit] The administrative center of the prefecture-level city is the Samzhubzê District
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Gyangtse
Gyantse
Gyantse
Town officially, Gyangzê Town (also spelled Gyangtse; Tibetan: རྒྱལ་རྩེ་, Wylie: rgyal rtse, ZYPY: Gyangzê; Chinese: 江孜镇; pinyin: Jīangzǐzhèn) is a town located in Gyantse
Gyantse
County, Shigatse
Shigatse
Prefecture, Tibet Autonomous Region, China. It was historically considered the third largest and most prominent town in the Tibet region (after Lhasa, and Shigatse), but there are now at least ten larger Tibetan cities.[1]Contents1 Location 2 Demographics 3 British military garrison 4 Landmarks 5 Climate 6 Footnotes 7 References 8 GalleryLocation[edit] The town is strategically located in the Nyang Chu valley on the ancient trade routes from the Chumbi Valley, Yatung
Yatung
and Sikkim, which met here
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Nêdong (village)
Nedong or Netong is a village in Nêdong County, in the Shannan Prefecture, in the Tibet Autonomous Region
Tibet Autonomous Region
of China. Nedong was the seat of the Phagmodrupa dynasty, which was the dominating regime in Tibet
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Theocracy
Theocracy
Theocracy
is a form of government in which a deity is the source from which all authority derives. The Oxford English Dictionary
Oxford English Dictionary
has this definition:1. a system of government in which priests rule in the name of God
God
or a god. 1.1. the commonwealth of Israel
Israel
from the time of Moses
Moses
until the election of Saul as King.[2][3]An ecclesiocracy is a situation where the religious leaders assume a leading role in the state, but do not claim that they are instruments of divine revelation: for example, the prince-bishops of the European Middle Ages, where the bishop was also the temporal ruler. Such a state may use the administrative hierarchy of the religion for its own administration, or it may have two 'arms'—administrators and clergy—but with the state administrative hierarchy subordinate to the religious hierarchy
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Monarch
A monarch is a sovereign head of state in a monarchy.[1][2] A monarch may exercise the highest authority and power in the state, or others may wield that power on behalf of the monarch. Typically a monarch either personally inherits the lawful right to exercise the state's sovereign rights (often referred to as the throne or the crown) or is selected by an established process from a family or cohort eligible to provide the nation's monarch. Alternatively, an individual may become monarch by conquest, acclamation or a combination of means
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Highland Barley
Highland barley, Tibetan barley or Himalayan barley (Tibetan: ནས་; Wylie: nas; Chinese: 青稞; qīngkē, or 藏青稞; zàng qīngkē) is the principal cereal cultivated on the Tibetan Plateau, used mainly to make milk tea, tsampa and alcohol. Today, it is used to make beer (Lhasa Beer), flour, bread, cakes or noodles. Three Chinese words are associated with two varieties of barley:青稞 and 藏青稞: Hordeum aegiceras Nees ex Royle[1] 青稞: Hordeum distichon L.Gallery[edit]Two highland barley alcohols (青稞酒) Highland barley, honey, and some other cereals biscuits (青稞蜂蜜酥) Various bread made from highland barley flour beer from highland barley flour (青稞咂酒) highland barley noodle among other Jiuzhaigou County meals. References[edit]^ 10c. Hordeum vulgare var. trifurcatum (Schlechtendal) Alefeld, Landw. Fl. 341. 1866
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Shamarpa
The Shamarpa
Shamarpa
(Tibetan: ཞྭ་དམར་པ་, Wylie: zhwa dmar pa; literally, "Person (i.e. Holder) of the Red Crown"),[1] also known as Shamar Rinpoche, or more formally Künzig Shamar Rinpoche, is a lineage holder of the Karma Kagyu
Kagyu
school of Tibetan Buddhism
Tibetan Buddhism
and is regarded to be the mind manifestation of Amitābha. He is traditionally associated with Yangpachen Monastery
Yangpachen Monastery
near Lhasa. The first Shamarpa, Drakpa Senggé (Wylie: grags pa seng+ge, 1283–1349),[2] was the principal disciple of Rangjung Dorje, 3rd Karmapa
Karmapa
Lama
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Mongol Empire
The Mongol
Mongol
Empire
Empire
(Mongolian: Mongolyn Ezent Güren  listen (help·info); Mongolian Cyrillic: Монголын эзэнт гүрэн; [mɔŋɡ(ɔ)ɮˈiːŋ ɛt͡sˈɛnt ˈɡurəŋ]; also Орда ("Horde") in Russian c
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Gorampa
Gorampa
Gorampa
Sonam Senge (Wylie: go rams pa bsod nams seng ge, 1429-1489[1]) was an important philosopher in the Sakya
Sakya
school of Tibetan Buddhism. He was the author of a vast collection of commentaries on sutra and tantra whose work was influential throughout Tibetan Buddhism. He established one of the definitive Tibetan understandings of the Prasaṅgika
Prasaṅgika
model of the Madhyamaka
Madhyamaka
school of philosophy
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Wylie Transliteration
The Wylie transliteration
Wylie transliteration
scheme is a method for transliterating Tibetan script
Tibetan script
using only the letters available on a typical English language typewriter. It bears the name of Turrell V
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Standard Tibetan
Standard Tibetan[4] is the most widely spoken form of the Tibetic languages. It is based on the speech of Lhasa, an Ü-Tsang (Central Tibetan) dialect. For this reason, Standard Tibetan
Standard Tibetan
is often called Lhasa
Lhasa
Tibetan.[5] Tibetan is an official[6] language of the Tibet Autonomous Region of the People's Republic of China
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Karma Kagyu
New branches:Blue Lotus AssemblyGateway of the Hidden FlowerNew Kadampa BuddhismShambhala BuddhismTrue Awakening TraditionHistoryTantrismMahasiddhaSahajaPursuitBuddhahood BodhisattvaKalachakraPracticesGeneration stage Completion stagePhowaTantric techniques: Fourfold division:KriyayogaCharyayogaYogatantraAnuttarayogatantraTwofold division:Inner TantrasOuter TantrasThought forms and visualisation:MandalaMantraMudraThangkaYantraYoga:Deity yogaDream yogaDeath yogaNgöndro Guru
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Historiography
Historiography
Historiography
is the study of the methods of historians in developing history as an academic discipline, and by extension is any body of historical work on a particular subject. The historiography of a specific topic covers how historians have studied that topic using particular sources, techniques, and theoretical approaches. Scholars discuss historiography by topic – such as the "historiography of the United Kingdom", the "historiography of Canada", "historiography of the British Empire", the "historiography of early Islam", the "historiography of China" – and different approaches and genres, such as political history and social history. Beginning in the nineteenth century, with the ascent of academic history, there developed a body of historiographic literature
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