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Rilu Rilu Fairilu
Rilu Rilu Fairilu (Japanese: リルリルフェアリル, Hepburn: Riru Riru Feariru) is a character franchise created in collaboration by Sanrio
Sanrio
and Sega Sammy Holdings, illustrated by character designer Ai Setani (KIRIMI-chan).[1][2] It is the second Sanrio
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Fantasy
Fantasy
Fantasy
is a genre of fiction set in a fictional universe, often without any locations, events, or people referencing the real world. Its roots are in oral traditions, which then became literature and drama. From the twentieth century it has expanded further into various media, including film, television, graphic novels and video games. Fantasy
Fantasy
is a subgenre of speculative fiction and is distinguished from the genres of science fiction and horror by the absence of scientific or macabre themes respectively, though these genres overlap. In popular culture, the fantasy genre is predominantly of the medievalist form
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Pinctada Fucata
Pinctada fucata, the Akoya pearl oyster, is a species of marine bivalve mollusk in the family Pteriidae, the pearl oysters. Some authorities classify this oyster as Pinctada imbricata fucata (Gould, 1850).[1] It is native to shallow waters in the Indo-Pacific region and is used in the culture of pearls.Contents1 Description 2 Distribution 3 Biology 4 Pearl culture 5 ReferencesDescription[edit] Pinctada fucata has two valves connected by a long straight hinge. The length of the shell is slightly greater than its width, and the latter is about 85% of the length of the hinge. The right valve is flatter than the left and there are hinge teeth in both valves. The anterior ear is larger than that in other members of the genus and there is a slit-like notch for the byssus threads to pass through at the junction of the ear and the rest of the shell. The posterior ear is large. The outer surface of the valves is scaly and reddish or golden brown with pale radiating streaks
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Lily Of The Valley
Lily of the valley
Lily of the valley
( Convallaria
Convallaria
majalis /ˌkɒnvəˈleɪriə məˈdʒeɪlɪs/[1]), sometimes written lily-of-the-valley,[2] is a sweetly scented, highly poisonous woodland flowering plant that is native throughout the cool temperate Northern Hemisphere
Northern Hemisphere
in Asia, and Europe. Other names include May bells, Our Lady's tears, and Mary's tears. Its French name, muguet, sometimes appears in the names of perfumes imitating the flower's scent. It is possibly the only species in the genus Convallaria
Convallaria
(depending on whether C. keiskei and C. transcaucasica are recognised as separate species). In the APG III system, the genus is placed in the family Asparagaceae, subfamily Nolinoideae
Nolinoideae
(formerly the family Ruscaceae[3])
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Hydrangea
See text Hydrangea
Hydrangea
(/haɪˈdreɪndʒiə/;[1] common names hydrangea or hortensia) is a genus of 70–75 species of flowering plants native to southern and eastern Asia (China, Japan, Korea, the Himalayas, and Indonesia) and the Americas. By far the greatest species diversity is in eastern Asia, notably China, Japan, and Korea. Most are shrubs 1 to 3 meters tall, but some are small trees, and others lianas reaching up to 30 m (98 ft) by climbing up trees. They can be either deciduous or evergreen, though the widely cultivated temperate species are all deciduous.[2] Having been introduced to the Azores, H
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Cherry Blossom
A cherry blossom is the flower of any of several trees of genus Prunus, particularly the Japanese cherry, Prunus
Prunus
serrulata, which is called sakura after the Japanese (桜 or 櫻; さくら).[1][2][3] Currently it is widely distributed, especially in the temperate zone of the Northern Hemisphere
Northern Hemisphere
including Japan, Taiwan, Korea, China, West Siberia, Iran, and Afghanistan.[4][5] Along with the chrysanthemum, the cherry blossom is considered the national flower of Japan.[6] Many of the varieties that have been cultivated for ornamental use do not produce fruit
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Red Spider Lily
Lycoris radiata, known as red spider lily, red magic lily, or equinox flower, is a plant in the amaryllis family, Amaryllidaceae, subfamily Amaryllidoideae.[2] Originally from China, Korea and Nepal, it was introduced into Japan and from there to the United States and elsewhere. It is considered naturalized in Seychelles and in the Ryukyu Islands.[3] It flowers in the late summer or autumn, often in response to heavy rainfall. The common name hurricane lily refers to this characteristic, as do other common names, such as resurrection lily; these may be used for the genus as a whole.[4]Contents1 Description 2 Taxonomy 3 Cultivation 4 Uses and legends 5 References 6 External linksDescription[edit]FlowerGirl with red spider lilyLycoris radiata is a bulbous perennial. It normally flowers before the leaves fully appear, on stems 30–70 centimetres (12–28 in) tall. The leaves are parallel-sided, 0.5–1 centimetre (0.20–0.39 in) wide with a paler central stripe
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Baby's Breath
Gypsophila paniculata (baby's breath, common gypsophila, panicled baby's-breath) is a species of flowering plant in the Caryophyllaceae family, native to central and eastern Europe. It is an herbaceous perennial growing to 1.2 m (4 ft) tall and wide, with mounds of branching stems covered in clouds of tiny white flowers in summer (hence the common name "baby's breath").[1] Its natural habitat is on the Steppes in dry, sandy and stony places, often on calcareous soils (gypsophila = "chalk-loving"). Specimens of this plant were first sent to Linnaeus from St Petersburg by the Swiss-Russian botanist Johann Amman.Contents1 Cultivation 2 Floristry 3 Invasive 4 ReferencesCultivation[edit] It is a popular ornamental garden subject, and thrives in well-drained alkaline to neutral soils in full sun
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Yuka Nishigaki
Yuka Nishigaki (西墻 由香, Nishigaki Yuka, born November 21[1]) is a Japanese voice actress from Tottori Prefecture. She is affiliated with Ken Production. Her husband is fellow voice actor Tsubasa Yonaga.[2]Contents1 Filmography1.1 Anime 1.2 Films 1.3 Video games2 References 3 External linksFilmography[edit] Anime[edit]2004Sgt
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Thistle
Thistle
Thistle
is the common name of a group of flowering plants characterised by leaves with sharp prickles on the margins, mostly in the family Asteraceae. Prickles occur all over the plant – on the stem and flat parts of leaves. They are an adaptation that protects the plant from being eaten by herbivores
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Dahlia
Georgina Willd. Dahlia
Dahlia
(UK: /deɪliə/ or US: /dɑːliə/)[3] is a genus of bushy, tuberous, herbaceous perennial plants native to Mexico. A member of the Asteraceae
Asteraceae
(or Compositae), dicotyledonous plants, related species include the sunflower, daisy, chrysanthemum, and zinnia. There are 42 species of dahlia, with hybrids commonly grown as garden plants. Flower forms are variable, with one head per stem; these can be as small as 5 cm (2 in) diameter or up to 30 cm (1 ft) ("dinner plate"). This great variety results from dahlias being octoploids—that is, they have eight sets of homologous chromosomes, whereas most plants have only two
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Jasmine
More than 200, see List of Jasminum species[1][2][3]Synonyms[4]Jacksonia hort. ex Schltdl Jasminium Dumort. Menodora Humb. & Bonpl. Mogorium Juss. Noldeanthus Knobl.Common jasmine Jasmine
Jasmine
(taxonomic name Jasminum /ˈjæsmɪnəm/)[5] is a genus of shrubs and vines in the olive family (Oleaceae). It contains around 200 species native to tropical and warm temperate regions of Eurasia, Australasia and Oceania. Jasmines are widely cultivated for the characteristic fragrance of their flowers
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Coral
Corals are marine invertebrates in the class Anthozoa
Anthozoa
of phylum Cnidaria. They typically live in compact colonies of many identical individual polyps. The group includes the important reef builders that inhabit tropical oceans and secrete calcium carbonate to form a hard skeleton. A coral "group" is a colony of myriad genetically identical polyps. Each polyp is a sac-like animal typically only a few millimeters in diameter and a few centimeters in length. A set of tentacles surround a central mouth opening. An exoskeleton is excreted near the base. Over many generations, the colony thus creates a large skeleton characteristic of the species. Individual heads grow by asexual reproduction of polyps
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Romance (love)
Romance is the expressive and pleasurable feeling from an emotional attraction towards another person. This feeling is associated with, but does not necessitate, sexual attraction. For most people it is eros rather than agape, philia, or familial love. In the context of romantic love relationships, romance usually implies an expression of one's strong romantic love, or one's deep and strong emotional desires to connect with another person intimately or romantically
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Seaweed
Seaweed
Seaweed
or macroalgae refers to several species of macroscopic, multicellular, marine algae.[1] The term includes some types of red, brown, and green macroalgae. Seaweed
Seaweed
offer excellent opportunities for its industrial exploitation as they could be a source of multiple compounds (i.e. polysaccharides, proteins and phenols) with applications as food [2][3] and animal feed,[3] pharmaceuticals [4] or fertilizersContents1 Taxonomy 2 Structure 3 Ecology 4 Uses4.1 Food 4.2 Herbalism 4.3 Filtration 4.4 Other uses4.4.1 Photo essay showing women in Zanzibar, Tanzania farming seaweed and making seaweed soap5 Health risks 6 Genera 7 See also 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External linksTaxonomy[edit] "Seaweed" is a colloquial term and lacks a formal definition. A seaweed may belong to one of several groups of multicellular algae: the red algae, green algae, and brown algae
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Fish
Tetrapods Fish
Fish
are the gill-bearing aquatic craniate animals that lack limbs with digits. They form a sister group to the tunicates, together forming the olfactores. Included in this definition are the living hagfish, lampreys, and cartilaginous and bony fish as well as various extinct related groups. Tetrapods emerged within lobe-finned fishes, so cladistically they are fish as well. However, traditionally fish are rendered paraphyletic by excluding the tetrapods (i.e., the amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals which all descended from within the same ancestry). Because in this manner the term "fish" is defined negatively as a paraphyletic group, it is not considered a formal taxonomic grouping in systematic biology
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