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Rikkyo University
Rikkyo University
University
(立教大学, Rikkyō daigaku), also known as Saint Paul's University, is a private university, in Ikebukuro, Tokyo, Japan. Rikkyo is known as one of the six leading universities in Tokyo (東京六大学 "Big Six" — Rikkyo University, University
University
of Tokyo, Keio University, Waseda University, Meiji University, and Hosei University). A leading liberal arts teaching and research institution, the university is the largest Anglican
Anglican
Christian
Christian
affiliated university in Japan. The university is internationally oriented and involved in numerous international programmes and projects. Rikkyo maintains contact with more than 140 educational institutions abroad for the purpose of exchanging lecturers, students and projects
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Private School
Private schools, also known to many as independent schools, non-governmental, privately funded, or nonstate schools,[1] are not administered by local, state or national governments; parents of kids who attend private schools choose to have their child be in a school where kids are accordingly selected based on either their family income, religious background, or simply based on their academics. Private schools retain the right to select their students and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition, rather than relying on mandatory taxation through public (government) funding; at some private schools students may be able to get a scholarship, lowering this tuition fee, dependent on a student's talents or abilities (e.g. sport scholarship, art scholarship, academic scholarship), need for financial aid, or tax credit scholarships that might be available
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1923 Great Kantō Earthquake
The Great Kantō earthquake (関東大震災, Kantō daishinsai) struck the Kantō Plain
Kantō Plain
on the Japanese main island of Honshū
Honshū
at 11:58:44 JST (02:58:44 UTC) on Saturday, September 1, 1923. Varied accounts indicate the duration of the earthquake was between four and ten minutes.[11] The earthquake had a magnitude of 7.9 on the moment magnitude scale (Mw),[12] with its focus deep beneath Izu Ōshima
Izu Ōshima
Island in Sagami Bay
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International Ornithological Congress
The International Ornithologists' Union, formerly known as the International Ornithological Committee, is a group of about 200 international ornithologists, and is responsible for the International Ornithological Congress and other international ornithological activities, undertaken by its standing committees.Contents1 International Ornithological Congress1.1 Meetings2 See also 3 External linksInternational Ornithological Congress[edit] The International Ornithological Congress series forms the oldest and largest international series of meetings of ornithologists. It is organised by the International Ornithologists' Union
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Foreign Settlement (Japan)
A foreign settlement (Japanese: 外国人居留地, pronounced "Gaikokujin kyoryūchi") was a special area in a treaty port, designated by the Japanese government in the second half of the nineteenth century, to allow foreigners to live and work. After the visits of Commodore Perry in 1853 and 1854, Japan entered a period of rapid social and economic transition from a closed, feudalistic society to a more open, modern trading nation state.[1] Japan first opened two ports to allow foreign trade, Shimoda and Hakodate after the signing the Convention of Kanagawa with the United States in 1854. It then designated five more treaty ports in 1858 with the signing of the Treaty of Amity and Commerce., Yokohama, Kobe, Nagasaki, Osaka, and Niigata. Trade agreements signed with the United States were swiftly followed by similar ones with Britain, the Netherlands, Russia and France
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Financial Endowment
A financial endowment is a donation of money or property to a nonprofit organization for the ongoing support of that organization. Usually the endowment is structured so that the principal amount is kept intact, while the investment income is available for use, or part of the principal is released each year, which allows for their donation to have an impact over a longer period than if it were spent all at once. An endowment may come with stipulations regarding its usage. The total value of an institution's investments is often referred to as the institution's endowment and is typically organized as a public charity, private foundation, or trust
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1894 Meiji Tokyo Earthquake
The 1894 Tokyo earthquake (明治東京地震, Meiji-Tokyo jishin) occurred in Tokyo, Japan at 14:04 PM on June 20. It affected downtown Tokyo and neighboring Kanagawa prefecture, especially the cities of Kawasaki and Yokohama. The earthquake had its epicenter in Tokyo Bay, with a magnitude of 6.6 on the Richter magnitude scale.[1] The depth of the 1894 earthquake has not been determined, but it is thought to have occurred within the subducting Pacific Plate under the Kantō region.[2] The death toll was 31 killed and 157 injured. The earthquake was mentioned by author Ichiyō Higuchi in her work Mizu-no-ue no nikki, in which she described damage to buildings in Yotsuya, and soil liquefaction in the Mita area of downtown Tokyo
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Sumida River
The Sumida River
Sumida River
(隅田川, Sumida-gawa) is a river that flows through Tokyo, Japan. It branches from the Arakawa River at Iwabuchi and flows into Tokyo
Tokyo
Bay. Its tributaries include the Kanda and Shakujii rivers. What is now known as the "Sumida River" was previously the path of the Ara-kawa. However, towards the end of the Meiji era work was carried out to divert the main flow of the Ara-kawa to prevent flooding. It passes through the following wards of Tokyo:Kita Adachi Arakawa Sumida Taito Kōtō ChūōChuo ohashi, one of the many bridges over the SumidaSan-ya-bori Canal in the Sumida River
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Samuel Mather
Samuel
Samuel
is a figure in the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
who plays a key role in the narrative, in the transition from the period of the biblical judges to the institution of a kingdom under Saul, and again in the transition from Saul
Saul
to David. He is venerated as a prophet by Jews, Christians, and Muslims
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Second World War
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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Christianity
Christianity[note 1] is an Abrahamic monotheistic religious system of beliefs and practices based on the life and teachings of Jesus
Jesus
of Nazareth. Its adherents, known as Christians, believe that Jesus
Jesus
Christ is the Son of God
Son of God
and savior of all people, whose coming as the Messiah
Messiah
was prophesied in the Hebrew Scriptures of Judaism, called Old Testament
Old Testament
in Christianity, and chronicled in the New Testament.[2] Christianity
Christianity
finds its beginning as a Second Temple Judaic sect in the 1st century in the Roman province
Roman province
of Judea. Jesus' apostles and their followers spread around Syria, Europe, Anatolia, Mesopotamia, Transcaucasia, Egypt, and Ethiopia, despite initial persecution
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Christian
A Christian
Christian
(/ˈkrɪstʃən, -tiən/ ( listen)) is a person who follows or adheres to Christianity, an Abrahamic, monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus
Jesus
Christ
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Imperial Rescript On Education
The Imperial Rescript on Education
Imperial Rescript on Education
(教育に関する勅語, Kyōiku ni Kansuru Chokugo) was signed by Emperor Meiji
Emperor Meiji
of Japan on 30 October 1890 to articulate government policy on the guiding principles of education on the Empire of Japan. The 315 character document was read aloud at all important school events, and students were required to study and memorize the text.Contents1 Background 2 Details 3 Kikuchi Dairoku
Kikuchi Dairoku
and the Imperial Rescript on Education 4 See also 5 SourcesBackground[edit] Following the Meiji Restoration, the leadership of the Meiji government felt the need to emphasize the common goals of rapid modernization (westernization) with support and legitimization of the political system centered on the imperial institution
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Saitama Prefecture
Saitama Prefecture
Saitama Prefecture
(埼玉県, Saitama-ken) is a prefecture of Japan located in the Kantō region.[1] The capital is the city of Saitama.[2] This prefecture is part of the Greater Tokyo
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Kenzo Tange
Kenzō Tange
Kenzō Tange
(丹下 健三, Tange Kenzō, 4 September 1913 – 22 March 2005) was a Japanese architect, and winner of the 1987 Pritzker Prize for architecture. He was one of the most significant architects of the 20th century, combining traditional Japanese styles with modernism, and designed major buildings on five continents. Tange was also an influential patron of the Metabolist movement. He said: "It was, I believe, around 1959 or at the beginning of the sixties that I began to think about what I was later to call structuralism", (cited in Plan 2/1982, Amsterdam), a reference to the architectural movement known as Dutch Structuralism. Influenced from an early age by the Swiss modernist, Le Corbusier, Tange gained international recognition in 1949 when he won the competition for the design of Hiroshima
Hiroshima
Peace Memorial Park
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TRIGA
TRIGA
TRIGA
(Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics) is a class of research nuclear reactor designed and manufactured by General Atomics. The design team for TRIGA, which included Edward Teller, was led by the physicist Freeman Dyson.Contents1 Design 2 History 3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksDesign[edit] TRIGA
TRIGA
is a pool-type reactor that can be installed without a containment building, and is designed for research and testing use by scientific institutions and universities for purposes such as undergraduate and graduate education, private commercial research, non-destructive testing and isotope production. The TRIGA
TRIGA
reactor uses uranium zirconium hydride (UZrH) fuel, which has a large, prompt negative fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity, meaning that as the temperature of the core increases, the reactivity rapidly decreases
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