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Riddhi
The marital status of Ganesha
Ganesha
varies widely in mythological stories and the issue has been the subject of considerable scholarly review.[1] Several patterns of associations with different consorts are identifiable. One pattern of myths identifies Ganesha
Ganesha
as an unmarried brahmacārin with no consorts. Another pattern associates him with the concepts of Buddhi (intellect), Siddhi (spiritual power), and Riddhi (prosperity); these qualities are sometimes personified as goddesses who are considered to be Ganesha's wives.[2] Another pattern connects Ganesha
Ganesha
with the goddess of culture and the arts, Sarasvati. In the Bengal
Bengal
region he is linked with the banana tree, Kala Bo (or Kola Bou).[3] Usually Ganesha's consort is portrayed as his shakti, a personification of his creative energy
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Raja Ravi Varma
Raja
Raja
Ravi Varma[3][4] (29 April 1848 – 2 October 1906) was a celebrated Malayali
Malayali
Indian painter and artist. He is considered among the greatest painters in the history of Indian art
Indian art
for a number of aesthetic and broader social reasons. Firstly, his works are held to be among the best examples of the fusion of European techniques with a purely Indian sensibility. While continuing the tradition and aesthetics of Indian art, his paintings employed the latest European academic art techniques of the day. Secondly, he was notable for making affordable lithographs of his paintings available to the public, which greatly enhanced his reach and influence as a painter and public figure. Indeed, his lithographs increased the involvement of common people with fine arts and defined artistic tastes among common people for several decades
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John Woodroffe
Sir John George Woodroffe (1865–1936), also known by his pseudonym Arthur Avalon, was a British Orientalist whose work helped to unleash in the West a deep and wide interest in Hindu philosophy
Hindu philosophy
and Yogic practices.Contents1 Life 2 Sanskrit
Sanskrit
Studies 3 The Serpent Power and The Garland of Letters 4 Mahānirvāṇatantraṃ 5 Bibliography 6 See also 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksLife[edit] Sir John George Woodroffe was the eldest son of James Tisdall Woodroffe, Advocate-General of Bengal and sometime Legal Member of the Government of India, J. P., Kt. of St. Gregory, by his wife Florence, daughter of James Hume. He was born on 15 December 1865 and was educated at Woburn Park School and University College, Oxford, where he took second classes in jurisprudence and the B.C.L. (Bachelor of Civil Law) examinations
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Maharashtra
Maharashtra
Maharashtra
(/mɑːhəˈrɑːʃtrə/; Marathi: [məharaːʂʈrə] ( listen), abbr. MH) is a state in the western region of India
India
and is India's second-most populous state and third-largest state by area. Spread over 307,713 km2 (118,809 sq mi), it is bordered by the Arabian Sea
Arabian Sea
to the west and the Indian states of Karnataka, Telangana, Goa, Gujarat, Chhattisgarh, Madhya Pradesh
Madhya Pradesh
and the Union territory of Dadra and Nagar Haveli. It is also the world's second-most populous subnational entity
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Diwali
Diwali
Diwali
or Deepavali is the Hindu
Hindu
festival of lights celebrated every year in autumn in the northern hemisphere (spring in southern hemisphere).[4][5] It is an official holiday in Fiji, Guyana, India,[6] Malaysia, Mauritius, Myanmar, Nepal, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Suriname, and Trinidad and Tobago
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Calcutta
Kolkata
Kolkata
/koʊlˈkɑːtə/ (Bengali pronunciation: [kolkat̪a]), formerly Calcutta /kælˈkʌtə/ until 2001, is the capital of the Indian state
Indian state
of West Bengal. Located on the east bank of the Hooghly River, it is the principal commercial, cultural, and educational centre of East India, while the Port of Kolkata
Port of Kolkata
is India's oldest operating port and its sole major riverine port. The city is widely regarded as the "cultural capital" of India, and is also nicknamed the "City of Joy". In 2011, the city had a population of 4.5 million, while the population of the city and its suburbs was 14.1 million, making it the third-most populous metropolitan area in India
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Durga
Durga, also identified as Adi Parashakti, Devi, Shakti, Bhavani, Parvati, Amba and by numerous other names, is a principal and popular form of Hindu
Hindu
goddess.[3][4][5] She is the warrior goddess, whose mythology centers around combating evils and demonic forces that threaten peace, prosperity and dharma of the good.[4][6] She is the fierce form of the protective mother goddess, willing to unleash her anger against wrong, violence for liberation and destruction to empower creation.[7] Durga
Durga
is depicted in the Hindu
Hindu
pantheon as a goddess riding a lion or tiger, with many arms each carrying a weapon,[1] often defeating Mahishasura (lit
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Plantain (cooking)
Cooking bananas[1][2][3] are banana cultivars in the genus Musa whose fruits are generally used in cooking. They may be eaten while ripe or unripe and are generally starchy. Some cooking bananas are also referred to as green bananas or plantains.(/ˈplæntɪn/[4][5] US: /plænˈteɪn/,[6] UK: /ˈplɑːntɪn/[4]) The term "plantain" is loosely applied to any banana cultivar that is eaten when cooked. However, there is no formal botanical distinction between bananas and plantains. Cooking is also a matter of custom, rather than necessity. Ripe plantains can be eaten raw, since the starches are converted to sugars as they ripen
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Durga Puja
ArtsBharatanatyam Kathak Kathakali Kuchipudi Manipuri Mohiniyattam Odissi Sattriya Bhagavata Mela Yakshagana Dandiya Raas Carnatic musicRites of passageGarbhadhana Pumsavana Simantonayana Jatakarma Namakarana Nishkramana Annaprashana Chudakarana Karnavedha Vidyarambha Upanayana Keshanta Ritushuddhi Samavartana Vivaha AntyeshtiAshrama DharmaAshrama: Brahmacharya Grihastha Vanaprastha SannyasaFestivalsDiwali Holi Shivaratri Navaratri Durga
Durga
Puja Ramlila Vijayadashami-Dussehra


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Sari
A sari, saree, or shari[note 1] is a female garment from the Indian subcontinent[1] that consists of a drape varying from five to nine yards (4.5 metres to 8 metres) in length[2] and two to four feet (60 cm to 1.20 m) in breadth[3] that is typically wrapped around the waist, with one end draped over the shoulder, baring the midriff.[4][5][6] There are various styles sari manufacture and draping, the most common being the Nivi style, which originated in Deccan region of India. The sari is worn with fitted bodice commonly called a choli (ravike in South India, cholo in Nepal, choli elsewhere) and petticoat called parkar or pavadai.[7] In the modern Indian subcontinent, the sari is widely regarded as a symbol of style, grace, and cultural pride
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Arthur Anthony Macdonell
Arthur Anthony Macdonell
Arthur Anthony Macdonell
(11 May 1854 – 28 December 1930),[1] 7th of Lochgarry, was a noted Sanskrit
Sanskrit
scholar.Contents1 Biography 2 Selected works 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Macdonell was born Muzaffarpur in India the son of Charles Alexander Macdonell, of the Indian Army. He was educated at Göttingen University, then matriculated in 1876 at Corpus Christi College, Oxford, gaining a classical exhibition and three scholarships (for German, Chinese, and the Boden Scholarship for Sanskrit). He graduated with classical honours in 1880 and was appointed Taylorian
Taylorian
Teacher of German at Oxford
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Thirty-two Forms Of Ganesha
Thirty-two forms of Ganesha are mentioned frequently in devotional literature related to the Hindu god Ganesha (Ganapati).[1][2][3] The Ganesha-centric scripture Mudgala Purana is the first to list them.[4] Detailed descriptions are included in the Shivanidhi portion of the 19th-century Kannada Sritattvanidhi. There are also sculptural representations of these thirty-two forms in the temples at Nanjangud and Chāmarājanagar (both in Mysore district, Karnataka), done about the same time as the paintings were done and also at the direction of the same monarch.[5] Each of the thirty-two illustrations is accompanied by a short Sanskrit meditation verse (dhyānaśloka), written in Kannada script. The meditation verses list the attributes of each form
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Mahaganapati
Mahaganapati
Mahaganapati
(Sanskrit: महागणपति, mahā-gaṇapati, literally "Ganesha, the Great"[1]), also spelled as Maha Ganapati is an aspect of the Hindu god Ganesha. He is the representation of Ganesha
Ganesha
as the Supreme Being and is the most important deity of the Ganesha-centric Ganapatya
Ganapatya
sect
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Bala Ganapati
Bala Ganapati
Bala Ganapati
(Sanskrit: बाल-गणपति, bāla-gaṇapati, literally "child Ganapati") is an aspect of the Hindu god
Hindu god
Ganesha (Ganapati), the elephant-headed of wisdom and fortune, depicted as a child.[1] There are few portrayals of Ganesha
Ganesha
as a small boy caressed by his parents, Parvati
Parvati
and Shiva.[1] An infant Ganesha
Ganesha
is also depicted held in his mother Parvati's lap or over her shoulder.[2] Independent portrayals of Bala Ganapati
Bala Ganapati
depict as seated or crawling.[3] A bronze from South India
South India
shows Ganesha
Ganesha
as an infant crawling on his knees. He has four arms
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