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Richard Gendall
Richard Gendall was a British expert on the Cornish language, born in 1924, died September 2017 aged 93[1] He was the founder of "Modern Cornish"/Curnoack Nowedga, which split off during the 1980s. Whereas Ken George
Ken George
mainly went to Medieval Cornish as the inspiration for his revival, Gendall went to the last surviving records of Cornish, such as John and Nicholas Boson, in the eighteenth-century. He was involved with University of Exeter[2] He was a folk musician, and made several recordings with Brenda Wootton, as well as a poet in writer in Cornish itself under the bardic name of "Gelvinak". Gendall founded Teere ha Tavaz, an organisation which seeks to promote the Cornish language
Cornish language
in its Modern Cornish or Curnoack Nowedga variety. It is also a small publisher on, and in, the Cornish language. Bibliography[edit]Kernewek Bew (Living Cornish). 1972 The Pronunciation of Cornish
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United Kingdom
The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(UK) or Britain, is a sovereign country in western Europe
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Ken George
Kenneth "Ken" J. George, is a British oceanographer, poet, and linguist[1] noted as being the originator of Kernewek Kemmyn, an orthography for the Cornish language
Cornish language
which he claims is more faithful to Middle Cornish phonology than its precursor (Unified Cornish). George has published over eighty items relating to Celtic linguistics, including several dictionaries of Cornish. His edition of the recently discovered Middle Cornish play Bewnans Ke
Bewnans Ke
was published by the Cornish Language Board in May 2006.[2] George received a Commendation for this work in the 2007 Holyer an Gof awards. He has translated numerous hymns and songs into Cornish, and also the lyrics of Die Zauberflöte. He has composed a substantial amount of poetry in Cornish, including the full-length play Flogholeth Krist, in the style of the Ordinalia. George lives in Cornwall, and speaks Breton and French as well as English and Cornish
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John Boson (writer)
John Boson (1655–1730) was a writer in the Cornish language. The son of Nicholas Boson, he was born in Paul, Cornwall. He taught Cornish to William Gwavas. His works in Cornish include an epitaph for the language scholar John Keigwin, and the "Pilchard Curing Rhyme".[1] He also wrote an epitaph for James Jenkins who died in 1710 and also wrote Cornish verse;[2] and translated parts of the Bible, the Lord's Prayer and the Apostles' Creed. The only known surviving lapidary inscription in the Cornish language (to Arthur Hutchens, died 1709), is also his work, and can be found in Paul Church where John Boson, his father, and their relative Thomas Boson are also buried. His work is collected, along with that of Nicholas and Thomas Boson, in Oliver Padel's The Cornish Writings of the Boson Family (1975). References[edit]^ John Boson. "Pilchard Curing Rhyme" Archived 2008-09-07 at the Wayback Machine., at www.moderncornish.co.uk. Cf
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Nicholas Boson
Nicholas Boson (1624–1708) was a writer in, and preserver of, the Cornish language. He was born in Newlyn
Newlyn
to a landowning and merchant family involved in the pilchard fisheries. Nicholas's mother had prevented their neighbours and servants speaking Cornish to him, so he only became fluent in the language when he needed it for business with fishermen. He assisted both William Scawen and Edward Lhuyd in their recording of Cornish. Boson wrote three significant texts in Cornish: "Nebbaz gerriau dro tho Carnoack" ("A Few Words about Cornish"), between 1675 and 1708; "Jowan Chy-an-Horth, py, An try foynt a skyans" ("John of Chyannor, or, The three points of wisdom"), published by Edward Lhuyd in 1707, though according to Lhuyd written about forty years earlier; and The Dutchess of Cornwall's Progress, partly in English and now known only in fragmentary quotations
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University Of Exeter
Streatham – 350 acres (140 ha)[3] Penryn – 70 acres (28 ha)[4] St. Luke's – 16 acres (6.5 ha)Colours Green and white                       Affiliations Russell Group Universities UK EUA ACU AMBA SETsquared GW4Website www.exeter.ac.ukThe University of Exeter
Exeter
is a public research university in Exeter, Devon, South West England, United Kingdom. The university was founded and received its Royal Charter
Royal Charter
in 1955, although its predecessor institutions, the Royal Albert Memorial College
Royal Albert Memorial College
and the University College of the South West of England, were established in 1900 and 1922 respectively.[5][6] In post-nominals, the University of Exeter
Exeter
is abbreviated as Exon
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Cornwall
Cornwall (/ˈkɔːrnwɔːl, -wəl/;[1] Cornish: Kernow [ˈkɛrnɔʊ]) is a county in South West England in the United Kingdom. The county is bordered to the north and west by the Celtic Sea,[2] to the south by the English Channel, and to the east by the county of Devon, over the River Tamar which forms most of the border between them. Cornwall forms the westernmost part of the South West Peninsula of the island of Great Britain. The furthest southwestern point of the island is Land's End; the southernmost point is Lizard Point. Cornwall has a population of 556,000 and covers an area of 3,563 km2 (1,376 sq mi).[3][4][5][6] The county has been administered since 2009 by the unitary authority, Cornwall Council. The ceremonial county of Cornwall also includes the Isles of Scilly, which are administered separately
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Bardic Name
A bardic name (Welsh: enw barddol, Cornish: hanow bardhek) is a pseudonym used in Wales, Cornwall
Cornwall
or Brittany
Brittany
by poets and other artists, especially those involved in the eisteddfod movement. The Welsh term bardd ("poet") originally referred to the Welsh poets of the Middle Ages, who might be itinerant or attached to a noble household. Some of these medieval poets were known by a pseudonym, for example Cynddelw Brydydd Mawr ("Cynddelw the Master Poet"), fl. 1155–1200 and Iolo Goch ("Iolo the Red"), c.1320 – c.1398
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Système Universitaire De Documentation
The système universitaire de documentation or SUDOC is a system used by the libraries of French universities and higher education establishments to identify, track and manage the documents in their possession. The catalog, which contains more than 10 million references, allows students and researcher to search for bibliographical and location information in over 3,400 documentation centers. It is maintained by the Bibliographic Agency for Higher Education (fr) (ABES). External links[edit]Official websiteThis article relating to library science or information science is a stub
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Mahunyes
Menheniot (pronounced Men-en-yut) (Cornish: Mahynyet)[1] is a civil parish and village in Cornwall, England, United Kingdom. The village is 2 1⁄2 miles (4.0 km) southeast of Liskeard.[2] The meaning of the name is "sanctuary of Neot" (from minihi and Neot).[3] Menheniot had a population of 1,605 in the 2001 census.[4] This had increased slightly to 1,655 at the 2011 census,[5] whereas the ward population at the same census was 3,658.[6] The village has a primary school, a pub, a shop and a post office.Contents1 Geography 2 Parish church 3 Economy and transport 4 References 5 External linksGeography[edit] To the south of the civil parish is Clicker Tor Quarry, a Site of Special Scientific Interest noted for its geological interest, containing one of the best examples of ultramafic rocks in South West England.[7] At Coldrennick is a black and white mansion dated 1870 by the architect C. F
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Nicholas Williams
Nicholas Jonathan Anselm Williams (born October 1942 in Walthamstow, Essex, now London, UK), writing as Nicholas Williams
Nicholas Williams
or sometimes N.J.A. Williams, is a leading expert on the Cornish language.Contents1 Life 2 Work 3 Coat of arms 4 Publications 5 References 6 External linksLife[edit] While a pupil at Chigwell School, Essex, Williams taught himself Cornish and became a bard of the Cornish Gorseth while still in his teens, taking the bardic name Golvan ('Sparrow'). He read classical languages, English language and Celtic in Oxford. After short periods in the universities of Belfast
Belfast
(where he received his PhD) and Liverpool, he was appointed lecturer in Irish in University College Dublin in 1977. In 2006, he was appointed Associate Professor in Celtic Languages there. He married Patricia Smyth from Portadown, County Armagh
County Armagh
in 1976
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Agan Tavas
Agan Tavas (Our Language) is a society which exists to promote the Cornish language and is represented on the Cornish Language Partnership. It was formed in 1987 to promote the use of Cornish as a spoken language in the Cornish revival (Cornish: Dasserghyans Kernowek). At that time only those observed to be using the language fluently could become members by invitation. In 1990 Agan Tavas was reformed by its members into an open society with the aim of ensuring continued support for the Unified form of revived Cornish first put forward in 1929 by Robert Morton Nance. Orthographic Standards[edit] Agan Tavas recognises the validity of any form of Revived Cornish based on orthography used by Cornish people at any time in the history of the language
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Dolly Pentreath
Dorothy Pentreath (16 May 1692 [baptised] – 26 December 1777), known as Dolly, was a speaker of the Cornish language. She is the best-known of the last fluent, native speakers of the Cornish language.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life 1.2 Later years, death, and legacy2 Monument 3 Last Cornish speaker 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit] Early life[edit] Baptised on 16 May 1692,[1] Pentreath was probably the second of the six children of fisherman Nicholas Pentreath and his second wife Jone Pentreath.[2] She later claimed that she could not speak a word of English until the age of 20
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Cussel An Tavas Kernuack
Cussel an Tavas Kernuak (Cornish Language Council) is an organisation promoting the revival of the Cornish language, in Cornwall, England, UK, and is represented on the Cornish Language Partnership. The CLC encourages research into the Cornish of all periods but supports the teaching and dissemination of modern (or Late) rather than medieval (or Middle) Cornish. The CLC sees itself as continuing the work of those who attempted to save the language in its last days in the 18th century.[citation needed] The choice to use Late Cornish reflects the desire, shared by Henry Jenner and others who began the revival of the language in the early 20th century, to pick up the language where it left off. However, in the 1920s this project had been abandoned[citation needed] and the leaders of the Revival decided to base Cornish on the religious literature of the 14th century, 15th century and early 16th century instead
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Cornish Language Partnership
The Cornish Language Partnership (Cornish: Keskowethyans an Taves Kernewek [kɛskɔˈwɛθjans an ˈtavɛs kɛrˈnɛwɛk], [kɛskɔˈwɛθjɐnz ɐn ˈtævɐzs kərˈnuːɐk]) is a representative body that was set up in Cornwall, England, UK in 2005 to promote and develop the use of the Cornish language.[2] It is a public and voluntary sector partnership[3] and consists of representatives from various Cornish language
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