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Richard Ellmann
Richard David Ellmann (March 15, 1918 – May 13, 1987) was an American literary critic and biographer of the Irish writers James Joyce, Oscar Wilde, and William Butler Yeats. He won the U.S. National Book Award for Nonfiction for James Joyce
James Joyce
(1959),[1] which is one of the most acclaimed literary biographies of the 20th century. Its 1982 revised edition was similarly recognised with the award of the James Tait Black Memorial Prize
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Literary Critic
Literary criticism
Literary criticism
(or literary studies) is the study, evaluation, and interpretation of literature. Modern literary criticism is often influenced by literary theory, which is the philosophical discussion of literature's goals and methods. Though the two activities are closely related, literary critics are not always, and have not always been, theorists. Whether or not literary criticism should be considered a separate field of inquiry from literary theory, or conversely from book reviewing, is a matter of some controversy. For example, the Johns Hopkins Guide to Literary Theory and Criticism[1] draws no distinction between literary theory and literary criticism, and almost always uses the terms together to describe the same concept
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A. S. Byatt
Dame Antonia Susan Duffy DBE HonFBA (née Drabble; born 24 August 1936), known professionally as A. S. Byatt
A. S. Byatt
(/ˈbaɪ.ət/ BY-ət),[1] is an English novelist, poet and Booker Prize
Booker Prize
winner. In 2008, The Times newspaper named her on its list of the 50 greatest British writers since 1945.[2]Contents1 Biography 2 Writing career 3 Memberships 4 Prizes and awards 5 Works5.1 Fiction 5.2 Short story collections 5.3 Essays and biographies 5.4 Texts edited6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksBiography[edit] Byatt was born in Sheffield
Sheffield
as Antonia Susan Drabble, the eldest child of John Drabble, QC, and Kathleen Bloor, a scholar of Browning.[3] Her sisters are the novelist Margaret Drabble
Margaret Drabble
and the art historian Helen Langdon
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New College, Oxford
Benedictus benedicat. May the Blessed One give a blessing Benedicto benedicatur. Let praise be given to the Blessed OneWebsite College websiteBoat club Boat ClubMapLocation in Oxford
Oxford
city centreNew College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford
Oxford
in the United Kingdom. Founded in 1379 by William of Wykeham, the full name of the college is The Warden and Scholars of St Mary's College of Winchester in Oxford. The name "New College", however, soon came to be used following its completion in 1386 to distinguish it from the older existing college of St. Mary, now known as Oriel College.[3] In 2017, the college ranked first[4] in the Norrington Table, a table assessing the relative performance of Oxford's undergraduates in final examinations. Historically, it has been ranked highly
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Wolfson College, Oxford
Wolfson College /ˈwʊlfsən/ is a constituent college of the University of Oxford
University of Oxford
in England. Located in north Oxford
Oxford
along the River Cherwell, Wolfson is an all-graduate college with over sixty governing body fellows, in addition to both research and junior research fellows. It caters to a wide range of subjects, from the humanities to the social and natural sciences
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Library Of Congress
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
(LOC) is the research library that officially serves the United States
United States
Congress and is the de facto national library of the United States. It is the oldest federal cultural institution in the United States. The Library is housed in three buildings on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.; it also maintains the Packard Campus in Culpeper, Virginia, which houses the National Audio-Visual Conservation Center.[3] The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
claims to be the largest library in the world.[4][5] Its "collections are universal, not limited by subject, format, or national boundary, and include research materials from all parts of the world and in more than 450 languages
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Wife
A wife is a female partner in a continuing marital relationship. A wife refers to a woman. The term continues to be applied to a woman who has separated from her partner, and ceases to be applied to such a woman only when her marriage has come to an end, following a legally recognized divorce or the death of her spouse
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David Lodge (author)
David John Lodge CBE
CBE
(born 28 January 1935) is an English author and literary critic. A professor of English Literature at the University of Birmingham
Birmingham
until 1987, he is best known for novels satirising academic life, particularly the "Campus Trilogy" – Changing Places: A Tale of Two Campuses (1975), Small World: An Academic Romance (1984), and Nice Work
Nice Work
(1988). Small World and Nice Work
Nice Work
were shortlisted for the Booker Prize. Another major theme is Roman Catholicism, beginning from his first published novel The Picturegoers (1960). Lodge has also written several television screenplays and three stage plays
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Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
(ALS), also known as motor neurone disease (MND), and Lou Gehrig's disease, is a specific disease which causes the death of neurons controlling voluntary muscles.[3][5][11] Some also use the term motor neuron disease for a group of conditions of which ALS is the most common.[2] ALS is characterized by stiff muscles, muscle twitching, and gradually worsening weakness due to muscles decreasing in size.[2] This results in difficulty speaking, swallowing, and eventually breathing.[2][3] The cause is not known in 90% to 9
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Northwestern University
Northwestern University
University
(NU) is a private research university based in Evanston, Illinois, United States, with other campuses located in Chicago
Chicago
and Doha, Qatar, and academic programs and f
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Emory University
Emory University
Emory University
is a private research university in the Druid Hills neighborhood of the city of Atlanta, Georgia, United States.[16] The university was founded as Emory College in 1836 in Oxford, Georgia
Oxford, Georgia
by the Methodist Episcopal Church
Methodist Episcopal Church
and was named in honor of Methodist bishop John Emory.[17] In 1915, the college relocated to its present location in Druid Hills
Druid Hills
and was rechartered as Emory University. The university is the second-oldest private institution of higher education in Georgia and among the fifty oldest private universities in the United States.[18] Emory is often ranked among the best universities in the world and a top private university in the United States
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Henry Louis Gates Jr.
Henry Louis "Skip" Gates Jr. (born September 16, 1950 in Keyser, West Virginia) is an American literary critic, teacher, historian, filmmaker and public intellectual who currently serves as the Alphonse Fletcher University Professor
Professor
and Director of the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research at Harvard University. He discovered what are considered the first books by African-American writers, both women, and has published extensively on appreciating African-American literature
African-American literature
as part of the Western canon. In addition to producing and hosting previous series on the history and genealogy of prominent American figures, since 2012 Gates has been host for four seasons of the series Finding Your Roots
Finding Your Roots
on PBS
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Helen Vendler
Helen Hennessy Vendler (born April 30, 1933)[1] is an American literary critic and is the A. Kingsley Porter University Professor at Harvard University.[2][3][4]Contents1 Life and career 2 Bibliography 3 Notes 4 External linksLife and career[edit] Vendler has written books on Emily Dickinson, W. B. Yeats, Wallace Stevens, John Keats, and Seamus Heaney. She has been a professor of English at Harvard University
Harvard University
since 1984; between 1981 and 1984 she taught alternating semesters at Harvard and Boston University.[5] In 1990 she was appointed to an endowed chair as the A. Kingsley Porter University Professor. She is the first woman to hold this position. She has also taught at Cornell University, Swarthmore and Smith College, and Boston University. She married (then later divorced) the philosopher Zeno Vendler with whom she had one son. In 1992 Vendler received a Litt. D
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Edna O'Brien
Edna O'Brien, DBE (born 15 December 1930) is an Irish novelist, memoirist, playwright, poet and short story writer. Philip Roth described her "the most gifted woman now writing in English",[1] while the former President of Ireland Mary Robinson
Mary Robinson
cited her as "one of the great creative writers of her generation".[2] O'Brien's works often revolve around the inner feelings of women, and their problems in relating to men, and to society as a whole.[3] Her first novel, The Country Girls, is often credited with breaking silence on sexual matters and social issues during a repressive period in Ireland following World War II.[4] The book was banned, burned and denounced from the pulpit, and O'Brien left Ireland behind. O'Brien now lives in London
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Epigraph (literature)
In literature, an epigraph is a phrase, quotation, or poem that is set at the beginning of a document or component.[1] The epigraph may serve as a preface, as a summary, as a counter-example, or to link the work to a wider literary canon,[2] either to invite comparison or to enlist a conventional context.[3] In a book, it is part of the front matter.Contents1 Examples1.1 Fictional quotations2 See also 3 References 4 Bibliography 5 External linksExamples[edit]The long quotation from Dante's Inferno that prefaces T. S. Eliot's "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" is part of a speech by one of the damned in Dante's Hell. Linking it to the monologue which forms Eliot's poem adds a comment and a dimension to Prufrock's confession. The epigraph to Eliot's Gerontion is a quotation from Shakespeare's Measure for Measure
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Denis Donoghue (academic)
Denis Donoghue (born 1928) is an Irish literary critic. He is the Henry James
Henry James
Chair of English and American Letters at New York University.[1]Contents1 Life and career 2 Works 3 Broadcasting 4 References 5 SourcesLife and career[edit] Donoghue was born at Tullow, County Carlow, into a Roman Catholic family, and was brought up in Warrenpoint, County Down, Northern Ireland, where his father was sergeant-in-charge of the Royal Ulster Constabulary. He was educated by the Irish Christian Brothers in Newry, County Down.[2] He studied Latin
Latin
and English at University College Dublin, earning a bachelor of arts degree in 1949, an M.A. in 1952, a Ph.D. in 1957, and a D.Litt. (honoris causa) in 1989.; and then at the Royal Irish Academy of Music. He earned a M.A
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