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Rice University
Rice University, officially William Marsh Rice University, is a private research university located on a 295-acre campus in Houston, Texas, United States. The university is situated near the Houston Museum District and is adjacent to the Texas
Texas
Medical Center. Rice is generally considered the foremost university and the most selective institution of higher education in the state of Texas.[10][11][12] Opened in 1912 after the murder of its namesake William Marsh Rice, Rice is now a research university with an undergraduate focus
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Private University
Private universities are typically not operated by governments, although many receive tax breaks, public student loans, and grants. Depending on their location, private universities may be subject to government regulation. This is in contrast to public universities and national universities
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Applied Science
Applied science
Applied science
is a discipline of science that applies existing scientific knowledge to develop more practical applications, like technology or inventions. Within natural science, disciplines that are basic science, also called pure science, develop basic information to predict and perhaps explain and understand phenomena in the natural world. Applied science is the use of scientific processes and knowledge as the means to achieve a particular practical or useful result. This includes a broad range of applied science related fields from engineering, business, medicine to early childhood education. Applied science
Applied science
can also apply formal science, such as statistics and probability theory, as in epidemiology
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Albert T. Patrick
Albert T. Patrick (February 26, 1866 – February 11, 1940) was a lawyer who was convicted and sentenced to death at Sing Sing for the murder of his client William Marsh Rice.[1] Case[edit] Patrick was born in Texas on February 26, 1866. He was charged with conspiring to murder Rice on 24 September 1900, convicted on 26 March 1902 and sentenced to be electrocuted. His appeals of the conviction — and his filing of a formal complaint against the practice of solitary confinement — delayed the execution of the sentence.[2] In 1906, Governor of New York Frank W
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Nobel Prize
The Nobel Prize
Nobel Prize
(/ˈnoʊbɛl/, Swedish pronunciation: [nʊˈbɛl]; Swedish definite form, singular: Nobelpriset; Norwegian: Nobelprisen) is a set of annual international awards bestowed in several categories by Swedish and Norwegian institutions in recognition of academic, cultural, or scientific advances. The will of the Swedish scientist Alfred Nobel
Alfred Nobel
established the prizes in 1895
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Fortune 500
The Fortune 500
Fortune 500
is an annual list compiled and published by Fortune magazine that ranks 500 of the largest United States
United States
corporations by total revenue for their respective fiscal years.[2] The list includes publicly held companies, along with privately held companies for which revenues are publicly available. The concept of the Fortune 500
Fortune 500
was created by Edgar P. Smith, a Fortune editor, and the first list was published in 1955.[3][4] The Fortune 500
Fortune 500
is more commonly used than its subset Fortune 100 or wider list Fortune 1000.[5]Contents1 Methodology 2 History 3 Fortune 500
Fortune 500
lists 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksMethodology[edit] The original Fortune 500
Fortune 500
was limited to companies whose revenues were derived from manufacturing, mining, and energy exploration
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NASA
The National Aeronautics
Aeronautics
and Space Administration ( NASA
NASA
/ˈnæsə/) is an independent agency of the executive branch of the United States federal government responsible for the civilian space program, as well as aeronautics and aerospace research.[note 1] President Dwight D. Eisenhower
Dwight D. Eisenhower
established NASA
NASA
in 1958[10] with a distinctly civilian (rather than military) orientation encouraging peaceful applications in space science
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Rhodes Scholarship
The Rhodes Scholarship, named after the Anglo-South African mining magnate and politician Cecil John Rhodes, is an international postgraduate award for students to study at the University of Oxford.[1] It is widely considered to be one of the world's most prestigious scholarships.[2] Established in 1902, it was the first large-scale programme of international scholarships,[3] inspiring the creation of a great many other awards across the globe (such as the Fulbright
Fulbright
program, Marshall Scholarship, and the Gates Cambridge Scholarship). As elaborated on in his will, Cecil Rhodes' goals in creating the Rhodes Scholar
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The Princeton Review
The Princeton Review
The Princeton Review
is a college admission services company offering test preparation services, tutoring and admissions resources, online courses, and books published by Random House. The company has more than 4,000 teachers and tutors in the United States and Canada and international franchises in 14 other countries. The company is headquartered in Natick, Massachusetts, and is privately held. It is not associated with Princeton University.[1]Contents1 Corporate history 2 Test preparation 3 Criticisms3.1 General 3.2 Ranking schools 3.3 Privacy concerns4 References 5 External linksCorporate history[edit] The Princeton Review
The Princeton Review
was founded in 1981 by John Katzman, who—shortly after leaving college—taught SAT
SAT
preparation to 15 students in New York City.[2] He served as CEO until 2007, and was replaced by Michael Perik
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Rowing (sport)
Rowing, often referred to as crew in the United States,[1] is a sport whose origins reach back to Ancient Egyptian times. It involves propelling a boat (racing shell) on water using oars. By pushing against the water with an oar, a force is generated to move the boat. The sport can be either recreational for enjoyment or fitness, or competitive, when athletes race against each other in boats.[2] There are a number of different boat classes in which athletes compete, ranging from an individual shell (called a single scull) to an eight-person shell with coxswain (called a coxed eight). Modern rowing as a competitive sport can be traced to the early 10th century when races were held between professional watermen on the River Thames
River Thames
in London, United Kingdom. Often prizes were offered by the London
London
Guilds
Guilds
and Livery Companies
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Water Polo
Water polo
Water polo
is a competitive team sport played in the water between two teams. The game consists of four quarters, usually of eight minutes, in which the two teams attempt to score goals and throw the ball into their opponent's goal. The team with the most goals at the end of the game wins the match. Each team is made up of six field players and one goalkeeper. Except for the goalkeeper, players participate in both offensive and defensive roles. the goal keeper is allowed to use 2 hands at all times. Water polo
Water polo
is typically played in an all-deep pool seven feet (or two meters) deep. Special
Special
equipment for water polo includes a water polo ball, which floats on the water; numbered and coloured caps; and two goals, which either float in the water or are attached to the side of the pool. The game is thought to have originated in Scotland in the late 19th century as a sort of "water rugby"
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Brazilian Jiu-jitsu
Brazilian jiu-jitsu
Brazilian jiu-jitsu
(/dʒuːˈdʒɪtsuː/; Portuguese: [ˈʒiw ˈʒitisu], [ˈʒu ˈʒitisu], [dʒiˈu dʒiˈtisu]) (BJJ; Portuguese: jiu-jitsu brasileiro) is a martial art and combat sport system that focuses on grappling and especially ground fighting. Brazilian jiu-jitsu was formed from Kodokan judo ground fighting (newaza) fundamentals that were taught by a number of individuals including Takeo Yano, Mitsuyo Maeda
Mitsuyo Maeda
and Soshihiro Satake
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Times Higher Education
Times Higher Education
Times Higher Education
(THE), formerly The Times
The Times
Higher Education Supplement (THES), is a weekly magazine based in London, reporting specifically on news and issues related to higher education. It is the United Kingdom's leading publication in its field.[1]Contents1 Publication history 2 Times Higher Education
Times Higher Education
World University Rankings 3 Awards 4 References 5 External linksPublication history[edit] From its first issue, in 1971, until 2008, The Times
The Times
Higher Education Supplement (THES) was published in newspaper format and was born out of, and affiliated with, The Times
The Times
newspaper. On 10 January 2008, it was relaunched as a magazine. It is published by TES Global, which until October 2005 was a division of Rupert Murdoch's News International. The magazine is edited by John Gill
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Materials Science
The interdisciplinary field of materials science, also commonly termed materials science and engineering is the design and discovery of new materials, particularly solids. The intellectual origins of materials science stem from the Enlightenment, when researchers began to use analytical thinking from chemistry, physics, and engineering to understand ancient, phenomenological observations in metallurgy and mineralogy.[1][2] Materials science
Materials science
still incorporates elements of physics, chemistry, and engineering. As such, the field was long considered by academic institutions as a sub-field of these related fields
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Nanotechnology
Nanotechnology
Nanotechnology
("nanotech") is manipulation of matter on an atomic, molecular, and supramolecular scale. The earliest, widespread description of nanotechnology[1][2] referred to the particular technological goal of precisely manipulating atoms and molecules for fabrication of macroscale products, also now referred to as molecular nanotechnology. A more generalized description of nanotechnology was subsequently established by the National Nanotechnology
Nanotechnology
Initiative, which defines nanotechnology as the manipulation of matter with at least one dimension sized from 1 to 100 nanometers
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Artificial Heart
An artificial heart is a device that replaces the heart. Artificial hearts are typically used to bridge the time to heart transplantation, or to permanently replace the heart in case heart transplantation is impossible. Although other similar inventions preceded it from the late 1940s, the first artificial heart to be successfully implanted in a human was the Jarvik-7 in 1982, designed by a team including Willem Johan Kolff and Robert Jarvik. An artificial heart is distinct from a ventricular assist device (VAD) designed to support a failing heart
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