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Rhipidura
Over 40, see textFantails are small insectivorous birds of Australasia, Southeast Asia and the Indian subcontinent belonging to the genus Rhipidura in the family Rhipiduridae
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Polymorphism (biology)
Polymorphism[1] in biology and zoology is the occurrence of two or more clearly different morphs or forms, also referred to as alternative phenotypes, in the population of a species. To be classified as such, morphs must occupy the same habitat at the same time and belong to a panmictic population (one with random mating).[2] Three mechanisms may cause polymorphism:[3] Genetic polymorphism – where the phenotype of each individual is genetically determined A conditional development strategy, where the phenotype of each individual is set by environmental cues A mixed development strategy, where the phenotype is randomly assigned during developmentPolymorphism as used in zoology and biology involves morphs of the phenotype, and the term polyphenism can be used to clarify that the different forms arise from the same genotype
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Rictal Bristle
The beak, bill, or rostrum is an external anatomical structure of birds that is used for eating and for preening, manipulating objects, killing prey, fighting, probing for food, courtship and feeding young. The terms beak and rostrum are also used to refer to a similar mouth part in some dicynodonts, Ornithischians, cephalopods, cetaceans, billfishes, pufferfishes, turtles, Anuran
Anuran
tadpoles and sirens. Although beaks vary significantly in size, shape, color and texture, they share a similar underlying structure. Two bony projections—the upper and lower mandibles—are covered with a thin keratinized layer of epidermis known as the rhamphotheca
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Solomon Islands
Coordinates: 8°S 159°E / 8°S 159°E / -8; 159Solomon IslandsFlagCoat of armsMotto: "To Lead is to Serve"Anthem: God Save Our Solomon Islands Royal anthem: God Save the QueenCapital and largest city Honiara 9°28′S 159°49′E / 9.467°S 159.817°E / -9.467; 159.817Official languages EnglishEthnic groups (1999)94.5% Melanesian 3.0% Polynesian 1.2% Micronesians 1.1% others 0.2% unspecifiedDemonym Solomon IslanderGovernment Unitary parliamentary constitutional monarchy• MonarchElizabeth II• Governor-GeneralFrank Kabui• Prime MinisterRick HouenipwelaLegislature National ParliamentIndependence• from the United Kingdom7 July 1978Area• Total28,400 km2 (11,000 sq mi) (139th)• Water (%)3.2%Population<
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Monarch Flycatcher
The monarchs (family Monarchidae) comprise a family of over 100 passerine birds which includes shrikebills, paradise flycatchers, and magpie-larks. Monarchids are small insectivorous songbirds with long tails. They inhabit forest or woodland across sub-Saharan Africa, south-east Asia, Australasia and a number of Pacific islands. Only a few species migrate. Many species decorate their cup-shaped nests with lichen.[1]Contents1 Taxonomy and systematics1.1 Taxonomic list2 Description 3 Distribution and habitat 4 Breeding 5 References 6 External linksTaxonomy and systematics[edit] Some of the one hundred or more species making up the family were previously assigned to other groups, largely on the basis of general morphology or behaviour
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Himalayas
The Himalayas, or Himalaya
Himalaya
(/ˌhɪməˈleɪə, hɪˈmɑːləjə/), form a mountain range in Asia
Asia
separating the plains of the Indian subcontinent from the Tibetan Plateau. The Himalayan range has many of the Earth's highest peaks, including the highest, Mount Everest. The Himalayas
Himalayas
include over fifty mountains exceeding 7,200 metres (23,600 ft) in elevation, including all of the fourteen 8,000-metre peaks. By contrast, the highest peak outside Asia
Asia
(Aconcagua, in the Andes) is 6,961 metres (22,838 ft) tall.[1] Lifted by the subduction of the Indian tectonic plate under the Eurasian Plate, the Himalayan mountain range runs, west-northwest to east-southeast, in an arc 2,400 kilometres (1,500 mi) long.[2] Its western anchor, Nanga Parbat, lies just south of the northernmost bend of Indus
Indus
river
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Philippines
Coordinates: 13°N 122°E / 13°N 122°E / 13; 122 Republic
Republic
of the Philippines Republika ng PilipinasFlagCoat of armsMotto:  "Maka-Diyos, Maka-Tao, Makakalikasan at Makabansa"[1] "For God, People, Nature, and Country"Anthem: Lupang Hinirang Chosen LandGreat SealDakilang Sagisag ng Pilipinas  (Tagalog) Great Seal of the PhilippinesCapital Manilaa 14°35′N 120°58′E / 14.583°N 120.967°E / 14.583; 120.967Largest city
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Indonesia
Coordinates: 5°S 120°E / 5°S 120°E / -5; 120 Republic
Republic
of Indonesia Republik Indonesia  (Indonesian)FlagNational emblemMotto:  Bhinneka Tunggal Ika
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Gape
The beak, bill, or rostrum is an external anatomical structure of birds that is used for eating and for preening, manipulating objects, killing prey, fighting, probing for food, courtship and feeding young. The terms beak and rostrum are also used to refer to a similar mouth part in some dicynodonts, Ornithischians, cephalopods, cetaceans, billfishes, pufferfishes, turtles, Anuran
Anuran
tadpoles and sirens. Although beaks vary significantly in size, shape, color and texture, they share a similar underlying structure. Two bony projections—the upper and lower mandibles—are covered with a thin keratinized layer of epidermis known as the rhamphotheca
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Plumage
Plumage
Plumage
(Latin: plūma "feather") refers both to the layer of feathers that cover a bird and the pattern, colour, and arrangement of those feathers. The pattern and colours of plumage differ between species and subspecies, and may vary with age classes. Within species there can be different colour morphs. The placement of feathers on a bird are not haphazard, but rather emerge in organized, overlapping rows and groups, and these feather tracts are known by standardized names.[1][2] Most birds moult, usually before and after breeding, resulting in a breeding or nuptial plumage and a basic plumage. Many ducks and some other species such as the red junglefowl have males wearing a bright nuptial plumage while breeding and a drab eclipse plumage for some months afterwards. The painted bunting's juveniles have two inserted moults in their first autumn, each yielding plumage like an adult females
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Kadavu Group
The Kadavu Group is an archipelago south of Viti Levu, one of Fiji's two main islands. Dominated by Kadavu Island, the fourth largest island in Fiji, the group also includes Ono, Dravuni, Galoa and a number of islets in the Great Astrolabe Reef. Kadavu Group - satellite viewv t eKadavu GroupDravuni Galoa Great Astrolabe Reef Kadavu Onov t eIslands of FijiPrincipal islandsViti Levu Vanua LevuSignificant outliersConway Reef Kadavu Taveuni RotumaArchipelagosKadavu Group Lau Islands Lomaiviti Islands Mamanuca Islands Moala Islands Ringgold Isles Rotuma
Rotuma
Group Vanua Levu
Vanua Levu
Group Viti Levu
Viti Levu
Group Yasawa IslandsCoordinates: 19°02′00″S 178°34′01″E / 19.0333°S 178.567°E / -19.0333; 178.567This article about a geographical location in Fiji
Fiji
is a stub
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Polynesia
Coordinates: 16°51′11″S 148°24′19″E / 16.8529613°S 148.4052203°E / -16.8529613; 148.4052203 Polynesia
Polynesia
is generally defined as the islands within the Polynesian triangleThe three major cultural areas in the Pacific Ocean: Melanesia, Micronesia, and Polynesia Polynesia
Polynesia
(UK: /ˌpɒlɪˈniːziə/; US: /ˌpɑːləˈniːʒə/, from Greek: πολύς polys "many" and Greek: νῆσος nēsos "island") is a subregion of Oceania, made up of more than 1,000 islands scattered over the central and southern Pacific Ocean
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Sexual Dimorphism
Sexual dimorphism
Sexual dimorphism
is the condition where the two sexes of the same species exhibit different characteristics beyond the differences in their sexual organs. The condition occurs in many animals and some plants. Differences may include secondary sex characteristics, size, color, markings, and may also include behavioral differences. These differences may be subtle or exaggerated, and may be subjected to sexual selection
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The Snares
Snares Islands/Tini Heke,[1] also known as The Snares, is a small island group lying about 200 km south of New Zealand's South Island and to the south-southwest of Stewart Island/Rakiura. The Snares consist of the main North East Island and the smaller Broughton Island as well as the Western Chain Islands some 5 km (3.1 mi) to the west-south-west. Collectively, the Snares have a total land area of 3.5 km2 (1.35 sq mi).Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Environment 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The island group was first sighted by Europeans on 23 November 1791 independently by the two ships HMS Discovery under Captain George Vancouver, and HMS Chatham commanded by Lieutenant William R. Broughton, both of the Vancouver Expedition
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New Guinea
New Guinea
New Guinea
(Tok Pisin: Niugini; Dutch: Nieuw-Guinea; German: Neuguinea; Indonesian: Papua or, historically, Irian) is a large island off the continent of Australia. It is the world's second-largest island, after Greenland, covering a land area of 785,753 km2 (303,381 sq mi), and the largest wholly or partly within the Southern Hemisphere
Southern Hemisphere
and Oceania. The eastern half of the island is the major land mass of the independent state of Papua New Guinea
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Rufous
Rufous
Rufous
#A81C07 #A81C07 Rufous
Rufous
/ˈruːfəs/ is a colour that may be described as reddish-brown or brownish-red, as of rust or oxidised iron.[1] The first recorded use of rufous as a colour name in English was in 1782.[2] However, the colour is also recorded earlier in 1527 as a diag
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