HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Restoration Branches
Restoration branches
Restoration branches
movement is a Christian/Latter Day Saint religious sect which was formed in the 1980s by members of the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints
Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints
(RLDS) in a reaction against the events of the RLDS 1984 world conference
[...More...]

"Restoration Branches" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Book
A book is a series of pages assembled for easy portability and reading, as well as the composition contained in it. The book's most common modern form is that of a codex volume consisting of rectangular paper pages bound on one side, with a heavier cover and spine, so that it can fan open for reading. Books have taken other forms, such as scrolls, leaves on a string, or strips tied together; and the pages have been of parchment, vellum, papyrus, bamboo slips, palm leaves, silk, wood, and other materials.[1] The contents of books are also called books, as are other compositions of that length. For instance, Aristotle's Physics, the constituent sections of the Bible, and even the Egyptian Book of the Dead
Book of the Dead
are called books independently of their physical form. Conversely, some long literary compositions are divided into books of varying sizes, which typically do not correspond to physically bound units
[...More...]

"Book" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Temple Lot
The Temple
Temple
Lot, located in Independence, Jackson County, Missouri, is the first site to be dedicated for the construction of a temple in the Latter Day Saint
Saint
movement. The area was dedicated on Wednesday, August 3, 1831 by the movement's founder, Joseph Smith, Jr.,[1] and purchased on December 19, 1831 by his colleague Edward Partridge
Edward Partridge
to be the center of the New Jerusalem
New Jerusalem
or "City of Zion" after he received a revelation stating that it would be the gathering spot of the Saints during the Last Days.[2] The most prominent 2.5-acre section of the Temple
Temple
Lot is currently an open, grass-covered field occupied in its northeast corner by a few trees and the headquarters of the Church of Christ ( Temple
Temple
Lot), which is not considered a temple by adherents of that sect
[...More...]

"Temple Lot" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Confirmation
In Christianity, Confirmation
Confirmation
is seen as the sealing of Christianity created in Baptism. Those being confirmed are known as confirmands. In some denominations, such as the Anglican
Anglican
Communion[1] and Methodist Churches,[2] confirmation bestows full membership in a local congregation upon the recipient. In others, such as the Roman Catholic Church, Confirmation
Confirmation
"renders the bond with the Church more perfect",[3] because, while a baptized person is already a member,[4] "reception of the sacrament of Confirmation
Confirmation
is necessary for the completion of baptismal grace".[5] Roman Catholics, Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, and Latter-Day Saint
Saint
Churches view Confirmation
Confirmation
as a sacrament. In the East it is conferred immediately after baptism
[...More...]

"Confirmation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Resurrection
Resurrection
Resurrection
is the concept of coming back to life after death. In a number of ancient religions, a dying-and-rising god is a deity which dies and resurrects. The death and resurrection of Jesus, an example of resurrection, is the central focus of Christianity. As a religious concept, it is used in two distinct respects: a belief in the resurrection of individual souls that is current and ongoing (Christian idealism, realized eschatology), or else a belief in a singular resurrection of the dead at the end of the world
[...More...]

"Resurrection" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Covenant (Latter Day Saints)
In the Latter Day Saint movement, a covenant is a promise made between God and a person or a group of people.[1] God sets the conditions of the covenant, and if the conditions are met, he blesses the person who entered into and kept the covenant.[1] If the covenant is violated, blessings are withheld and in some cases a penalty or punishment is inflicted.[1] Latter Day Saint leaders teach that just as the God of Israel asked the children of Israel to be a covenant people, "a peculiar treasure unto me ... a kingdom of priests, and an holy nation,"[2] today God has asked for a latter-day people who will make and keep covenants with him
[...More...]

"Covenant (Latter Day Saints)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Same-sex Marriage
Argentina Australia Austria* Belgium Brazil Canada Colombia Denmark Finland France Germany Iceland Ireland Luxembourg Malta Mexico: · 12 states & CDMX Netherlands1 New Zealand2 Norway Portugal South Africa Spain Sweden United Kingdom3 United States4 UruguayRecognizedArmenia5 Estonia5 Israel5,6Mexico7 Netherlands: · AW, CW, SX8 Civil unions
Civil unions
and registered partnershipsAndorra Austria Chile Croatia Cyprus Czech Republic Ecuador Estonia* Greece Hungary Italy Liechtenstein Mexico: · Tlaxca
[...More...]

"Same-sex Marriage" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Song Of Solomon
The Song of Songs, also Song of Solomon
Song of Solomon
or Canticles (Hebrew: שִׁיר הַשִּׁירִים‬, Šîr HašŠîrîm, Greek: ᾎσμα ᾎσμάτων, asma asmaton, both meaning Song of Songs), is one of the megillot (scrolls) found in the last section of the Tanakh, known as the Ketuvim
[...More...]

"Song Of Solomon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Law Of Non-contradiction
In classical logic, the law of non-contradiction (LNC) (also known as the law of contradiction, principle of non-contradiction (PNC), or the principle of contradiction) states that contradictory statements cannot both be true in the same sense at the same time, e.g. the two propositions "A is B " and "A is not B " are mutually exclusive. It is the second of the three classic laws of thought. The principle was stated as a theorem of propositional logic by Russell and Whitehead in Principia Mathematica as: ∗ 3 ⋅ 24 .     ⊢ . ∼ ( p . ∼ p ) displaystyle mathbf *3cdot 24
[...More...]

"Law Of Non-contradiction" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Independence Temple
The Temple
Temple
in Independence, Missouri, is a house of worship and education "dedicated to the pursuit of peace".[1] It dominates the skyline of Independence, Missouri, USA, and has become the focal point of the headquarters of the Community of Christ
Community of Christ
(formerly, the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ
Jesus Christ
of Latter Day Saints[2]). The temple was built by the Community of Christ
Community of Christ
in response to a revelation presented to their 1984 World Conference by church prophet-president Wallace B. Smith
[...More...]

"Independence Temple" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Abomination (Bible)
Abomination (from Latin
Latin
abominare, "to deprecate as an ill omen") is an English term used to translate the Biblical Hebrew terms shiqquts שיקוץ and sheqets שקץ,[1] which are derived from shâqats, or the terms תֹּועֵבָה, tōʻēḇā or to'e'va (noun) or ta'ev (verb). An abomination in English is that which is exceptionally loathsome, hateful, sinful, wicked, or vile. The Biblical words usually translated as "abomination" do not always convey the same sense of moral exceptionalism as the English term does today, as it often may signify that which is forbidden or unclean according to the religion (especially sheqets). Linguistically in this case, it may be closer in meaning to the Polynesian term taboo or tapu, signifying that which is forbidden, and should not be eaten, and or not touched, and which sometimes was a capital crime. The word most often translated "abomination" to denote grave moral offenses is Tōʻēḇā
[...More...]

"Abomination (Bible)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Repentance
Repentance
Repentance
is the activity of reviewing one's actions and feeling contrition or regret for past wrongs, which is accompanied by commitment to change for the better.[1] Today, it is generally seen as involving a commitment to personal change and the resolve to live a more responsible and humane life. In other words, being sorry for one's misdeeds. But it can also involve sorrow over a specific sin or series of sins that an individual feels he or she has committed. The practice of repentance plays an important role in the soteriological doctrines of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, in which it is often considered necessary for the attainment of salvation. Analogous practices have been found in other world religions as well. In religious contexts, it often involves an act of confession to God or to a spiritual elder (such as a monk or priest)
[...More...]

"Repentance" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tithe
A tithe (/taɪð/; from Old English: teogoþa "tenth") is a one-tenth part of something, paid as a contribution to a religious organization or compulsory tax to government.[1] Today, tithes are normally voluntary and paid in cash, cheques, or stocks, whereas historically tithes were required and paid in kind, such as agricultural products. Several European countries operate a formal process linked to the tax system allowing some churches to assess tithes. Traditional Jewish law and practice has included various forms of tithing since ancient times. Orthodox Jews commonly practice ma'aser kesafim (tithing 10% of their income to charity). In modern Israel, Jews continue to follow the laws of agricultural tithing, e.g., ma'aser rishon, terumat ma'aser, and ma'aser sheni. In Christianity, some interpretations of Biblical teachings conclude that although tithing was practiced extensively in the Old Testament, it was never practiced or taught within the first-century Church
[...More...]

"Tithe" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Holy Spirit
Holy Spirit
Spirit
or Holy Ghost is a term found in English translations of the Bible that is understood differently among the Abrahamic religions.[1][2] The term is also used to describe aspects of other religions and belief structures.Contents1 Etymology 2 Comparative religion 3 Abrahamic religions3.1 Judaism 3.2 Christianity 3.3 Islam4 Other religions4.1 Bahá'í Faith 4.2 In Hinduism 4.3 Buddhism 4.4 Sikhism5 See also 6 References6.1 Works citedEtymology[edit] The word "Spirit" (from the Latin spiritus meaning "breath") appears as either alone or with other words, in the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
(Old Testament) and the New Testament
[...More...]

"Holy Spirit" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

The Comforter
Paraclete (Gr. παράκλητος, Lat. paracletus) means advocate or helper. In Christianity, the term "paraclete" most commonly refers to the Holy Spirit.Contents1 Etymology 2 In Classical Greek 3 In Judaism 4 In Christianity4.1 Scholar interpretations 4.2 Paraclete first appearing in gospel5 In Islam5.1 A letter from antiquity6 See also 7 References 8 External linksEtymology[edit] Paraclete comes from the Koine Greek word παράκλητος (paráklētos) that can signify "called to one's aid in a court of justice", a "legal assistant", an "assistant", or an "intercessor".[1] The word for paraclete is passive in form, and etymologically (originally) signified "called to one's side"
[...More...]

"The Comforter" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Divorce
Divorce, also known as dissolution of marriage, is the termination of a marriage or marital union, the canceling or reorganizing of the legal duties and responsibilities of marriage, thus dissolving the bonds of matrimony between a married couple under the rule of law of the particular country or state. Divorce
Divorce
laws vary considerably around the world, but in most countries divorce requires the sanction of a court or other authority in a legal process, which may involve issues of alimony (spousal support), child custody, child visitation / access, parenting time, child support, distribution of property, and division of debt
[...More...]

"Divorce" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.