HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Resonance
In physics, resonance is a phenomenon in which a vibrating system or external force drives another system to oscillate with greater amplitude at specific frequencies. Frequencies at which the response amplitude is a relative maximum are known as the system's resonant frequencies or resonance frequencies. At resonant frequencies, small periodic driving forces have the ability to produce large amplitude oscillations, due to the storage of vibrational energy.Contents1 Overview 2 Examples2.1 Tacoma Narrows Bridge 2.2 International Space Station3 Types of resonance3.1 Mechanical and acoustic resonance 3.2 Electrical resonance 3.3 Optical resonance 3.4 Orbital resonance 3.5 Atomic, particle, and molecular resonance4 Theory 5 Resonators 6 Q factor 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksOverview[edit] <
[...More...]

"Resonance" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sinusoidal
A sine wave or sinusoid is a mathematical curve that describes a smooth periodic oscillation. A sine wave is a continuous wave. It is named after the function sine, of which it is the graph. It occurs often in pure and applied mathematics, as well as physics, engineering, signal processing and many other fields
[...More...]

"Sinusoidal" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Metal
A metal (from Greek μέταλλον métallon, "mine, quarry, metal"[1][2]) is a material (an element, compound, or alloy) that is typically hard when in solid state, opaque, shiny, and has good electrical and thermal conductivity. Metals are generally malleable—that is, they can be hammered or pressed permanently out of shape without breaking or cracking—as well as fusible (able to be fused or melted) and ductile (able to be drawn out into a thin wire).[3] Around 90 of the 118 elements in the periodic table are metals; the others are nonmetals or metalloids, though elements near the boundaries of each category have been assigned variably to either (hence the lack of an exact count). Some elements appear in both metallic and non-metallic forms. Astrophysicists use the term "metal" to refer collectively to all elements in a star that are heavier than the lightest two, hydrogen and helium, and not just traditional metals
[...More...]

"Metal" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Solfège
In music, solfège (/ˈsɒlfɛʒ/,[1] also US: /sɒlˈfɛʒ/, French: [sɔl.fɛʒ]) or solfeggio (/sɒlˈfɛdʒioʊ/, Italian: [solˈfeddʒo]), also called sol-fa, solfa, solfeo, among many names, is a music education method used to teach pitch and sight singing of Western music. Solfège
Solfège
is a form of solmization, and though the two terms are sometimes used interchangeably, the systems used in other music cultures such as swara, durar mufaṣṣalāt and Jianpu
Jianpu
are discussed in their respective articles. Syllables are assigned to the notes of the scale and enable the musician to audiate, or mentally hear, the pitches of a piece of music which he or she is seeing for the first time and then to sing them aloud. Through the Renaissance (and much later in some shapenote publications) various interlocking 4, 5 and 6-note systems were employed to cover the octave
[...More...]

"Solfège" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Ut Queant Laxis
"Ut queant laxis" or "Hymnus in Ioannem" is a Latin hymn in honour of John the Baptist written in Horatian Sapphics[1] and traditionally attributed to Paulus Diaconus, the eighth-century Lombard historian. It is famous for its part in the history of musical notation, in particular solmization. The hymn is sung to a Gregorian chant, the original do-re-mi music. It is not known who wrote the melody. Guido possibly composed it,[2] but he more likely used an existing melody
[...More...]

"Ut Queant Laxis" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Guido Of Arezzo
Guido of Arezzo
Arezzo
(also Guido Aretinus, Guido Aretino, Guido da Arezzo, Guido Monaco, or Guido d'Arezzo, or Guy of Arezzo
Arezzo
also Guy d'Arezzo) (991/992 – after 1033) was an Italian music theorist of the Medieval era. He is regarded as the inventor of modern musical notation (staff notation) that replaced neumatic notation; his text, the Micrologus, was the second-most-widely distributed treatise on music in the Middle Ages (after the writings of Boethius).Contents1 Life 2 The Guidonian hand 3 Legacy 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksLife[edit] Guido was a Benedictine
Benedictine
monk from the Italian city-state of Arezzo. Recent research has dated his Micrologus to 1025 or 1026; since Guido stated in a letter that he was thirty-four when he wrote it,[1] his birthdate is presumed to be around 991 or 992
[...More...]

"Guido Of Arezzo" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Swing (seat)
A swing is a hanging seat, often found at playgrounds for children, at a circus for acrobats, or on a porch for relaxing, although they may also be items of indoor furniture, such as Latin American hammock or the Indian oonjal. The seat of a swing may be suspended from chains or ropes. Once a swing is in motion, it continues to oscillate like a pendulum until external interference or drag brings it to a halt. Swing sets are very popular with children. On playgrounds, several swings are often suspended from the same metal or wooden frame, known as a swing set, allowing more than one child to play at a time. Such swings come in a variety of sizes and shapes. For infants and toddlers, swings with leg holes support the child in an upright position while a parent or sibling pushes the child to get a swinging motion
[...More...]

"Swing (seat)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

TV
Television
Television
(TV) is a telecommunication medium used for transmitting moving images in monochrome (black and white), or in colour, and in two or three dimensions and sound. The term can refer to a television set, a television program ("TV show"), or the medium of television transmission. Television
Television
is a mass medium for advertising, entertainment and news. Television
Television
became available in crude experimental forms in the late 1920s, but it would still be several years before the new technology would be marketed to consumers. After World War II, an improved form of black-and-white TV broadcasting became popular in the United States and Britain, and television sets became commonplace in homes, businesses, and institutions
[...More...]

"TV" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Sonorant
In phonetics and phonology, a sonorant or resonant is a speech sound that is produced with continuous, non-turbulent airflow in the vocal tract; these are the manners of articulation that are most often voiced in the world's languages. Vowels are sonorants, as are consonants like /m/ and /l/: approximants, nasals, flaps or taps, and most trills. In older usage, only the term resonant was used with this meaning, and sonorant was a narrower term, referring to all resonants except vowels and semivowels.Contents1 Types1.1 Voiceless2 Examples 3 Sound changes 4 See also 5 References 6 BibliographyTypes[edit] Whereas obstruents are frequently voiceless, sonorants are almost always voiced. A typical sonorant consonant inventory found in many languages comprises the following: two nasals /m/, /n/, two semivowels /w/, /j/, and two liquids /l/, /r/.[citation needed] In the sonority hierarchy, all sounds higher than fricatives are sonorants
[...More...]

"Sonorant" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Glass
Glass
Glass
is a non-crystalline amorphous solid that is often transparent and has widespread practical, technological, and decorative usage in, for example, window panes, tableware, and optoelectronics. The most familiar, and historically the oldest, types of glass are "silicate glasses" based on the chemical compound silica (silicon dioxide, or quartz), the primary constituent of sand. The term glass, in popular usage, is often used to refer only to this type of material, which is familiar from use as window glass and in glass bottles
[...More...]

"Glass" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Musical Instrument
A musical instrument is an instrument created or adapted to make musical sounds. In principle, any object that produces sound can be considered a musical instrument—it is through purpose that the object becomes a musical instrument. The history of musical instruments dates to the beginnings of human culture. Early musical instruments may have been used for ritual, such as a trumpet to signal success on the hunt, or a drum in a religious ceremony. Cultures eventually developed composition and performance of melodies for entertainment. Musical instruments evolved in step with changing applications. The date and origin of the first device considered a musical instrument is disputed. The oldest object that some scholars refer to as a musical instrument, a simple flute, dates back as far as 67,000 years
[...More...]

"Musical Instrument" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Wood
Wood
Wood
is a porous and fibrous structural tissue found in the stems and roots of trees and other woody plants. It is an organic material, a natural composite of cellulose fibers that are strong in tension and embedded in a matrix of lignin that resists compression. Wood
Wood
is sometimes defined as only the secondary xylem in the stems of trees,[1] or it is defined more broadly to include the same type of tissue elsewhere such as in the roots of trees or shrubs.[citation needed] In a living tree it performs a support function, enabling woody plants to grow large or to stand up by themselves. It also conveys water and nutrients between the leaves, other growing tissues, and the roots
[...More...]

"Wood" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Atomic Spacing
Atomic spacing refers to the distance between the nuclei of atoms in a material. This space is extremely large compared to the size of the atomic nucleus, and is related to the chemical bonds which bind atoms together.[1] The spacing between atoms in most ordered solids is on the order of a few ångströms (a few tenths of a nanometer). In very low density gasses (for example, in outer space) the average distance between atoms can be as large as a meter. The atomic spacing of crystalline structures is usually determined by passing an electromagnetic wave of known frequency through the material, and using the laws of diffraction to determine its atomic spacing. Bond length can be determined between different elements in molecules by using the atomic radii of the atom. Carbon bonds with itself to form two covalent network solids.[2] Diamond's C-C bond has a distance of 0.142 nm away from each carbon, while graphite's C-C bond has a distance of 0.341 nm away from each carbon
[...More...]

"Atomic Spacing" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Quartz Crystal
Quartz is a mineral composed of silicon and oxygen atoms in a continuous framework of SiO4 silicon–oxygen tetrahedra, with each oxygen being shared between two tetrahedra, giving an overall chemical formula of SiO2. Quartz is the second most abundant mineral in Earth's continental crust, behind feldspar.[7] Quartz crystals are chiral, and exist in two forms, the normal α-quartz and the high-temperature β-quartz. The transformation from α-quartz to β-quartz takes place abruptly at 573 °C (846 K). Since the transformation is accompanied by a significant change in volume, it can easily induce fracturing of ceramics or rocks passing through this temperature limit. There are many different varieties of quartz, several of which are semi-precious gemstones
[...More...]

"Quartz Crystal" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Quartz Watch
A quartz clock is a clock that uses an electronic oscillator that is regulated by a quartz crystal to keep time. This crystal oscillator creates a signal with very precise frequency, so that quartz clocks are at least an order of magnitude more accurate than mechanical clocks. Generally, some form of digital logic counts the cycles of this signal and provides a numeric time display, usually in units of hours, minutes, and seconds. The first quartz clock was built in 1927 by Warren Marrison and J. W. Horton at Bell Telephone Laboratories
[...More...]

"Quartz Watch" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bay Of Fundy
The Bay of Fundy
Bay of Fundy
(or Fundy Bay) is a bay between the Canadian provinces of New Brunswick
New Brunswick
and Nova Scotia, with a small portion touching the state of Maine. It has the highest tidal range in the world
[...More...]

"Bay Of Fundy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.