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Residential Segregation
Residential segregation in the United States
Residential segregation in the United States
is the physical separation of two or more groups into different neighborhoods,[1] or a form of segregation that "sorts population groups into various neighborhood contexts and shapes the living environment at the neighborhood level".[2] While it has traditionally been associated with racial segregation, it generally refers to any kind of sorting based on some criteria populations (e.g. race, ethnicity, income).[3] While overt segregation is illegal in the United States, housing patterns show significant and persistent segregation for certain races and income groups. The history of American social and public policies, like Jim Crow laws
Jim Crow laws
and Federal Housing Administration's early redlining policies, set the tone for segregation in housing
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Gentrification
Gentrification
Gentrification
is a process of renovation of deteriorated urban neighborhoods by means of the influx of more affluent residents.[1][2] This is a common and controversial topic in politics and in urban planning. Gentrification
Gentrification
can improve the quality of a neighborhood, while also potentially forcing relocation of current, established residents and businesses, causing them to move from a gentrified area, seeking lower cost housing and stores. Gentrification
Gentrification
often shifts a neighborhood’s racial/ethnic composition and average household income by developing new, more expensive housing, businesses and improved resources.[3] Conversations about gentrification have evolved, as many in the social-scientific community have questioned the negative connotations associated with the word gentrification
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Detroit
Detroit
Detroit
(/dɪˈtrɔɪt/)[6] is the most populous city in the U.S. state of Michigan, the largest city on the United States–Canada border, and the seat of Wayne County. The municipality of Detroit
Detroit
had a 2016 estimated population of 672,795, making it the 23rd-most populous city in the United States. The metropolitan area, known as Metro Detroit, is home to 4.3 million people, making it the second-largest in the Midwest
Midwest
after Chicago. Detroit
Detroit
is a major port on the Detroit
Detroit
River, one of the four major straits that connect the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
system to the Saint Lawrence Seaway. The Detroit Metropolitan Airport
Detroit Metropolitan Airport
is among the most important hubs in the United States
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U.S. Census
The United States
United States
Census
Census
is a decennial census mandated by Article I, Section 2 of the United States
United States
Constitution, which states: "Representatives and direct Taxes shall be apportioned among the several States ... according to their respective Numbers ... . The actual Enumeration shall be made within three Years after the first Meeting of the Congress of the United States, and within every subsequent Term of ten Years."[1][2] The United States
United States
Census
Census
Bureau (officially the Bureau of the Census, as defined in Title 13 U.S.C. § 11) is responsible for the United States
United States
Census
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Harvard University
Harvard University
Harvard University
is a private Ivy League
Ivy League
research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Established in 1636 and named for clergyman John Harvard (its first benefactor), its history, influence, and wealth have made it one of the world's most prestigious universities.[8] Harvard is the United States' oldest institution of higher learning,[9] and the Harvard Corporation
Harvard Corporation
(formally, the President and Fellows of Harvard College) is its first chartered corporation. Although never formally affiliated with any denomination, the early College primarily trained Congregational and Unitarian clergy. Its curriculum and student body were gradually secularized during the 18th century, and by the 19th century, Harvard had emerged as the central cultural establishment among Boston elites.[10][11] Following the American Civil War, President Charles W
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Duke University
Duke University
Duke University
is a private research university located in Durham, North Carolina. Founded by Methodists and Quakers
Quakers
in the present-day town of Trinity in 1838, the school moved to Durham in 1892.[9] In 1924, tobacco and electric power industrialist James Buchanan Duke established The Duke Endowment, at which time the institution changed its name to honor his deceased father, Washington Duke. Duke's campus spans over 8,600 acres (3,500 hectares) on three contiguous campuses in Durham as well as a marine lab in Beaufort. The main campus—designed largely by architect Julian Abele—incorporates Gothic architecture with the 210-foot (64-meter) Duke Chapel
Duke Chapel
at the campus' center and highest point of elevation
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Manhattan Institute For Policy Research
The Manhattan Institute for Policy Research
Manhattan Institute for Policy Research
(renamed in 1981 from the International Center for Economic Policy Studies) is a conservative 501(c)(3) non-profit American think tank focused on domestic policy and urban affairs, established in New York City
New York City
in 1977 by Antony Fisher and William J. Casey.[1][3][4] The organization describes its mission as to "develop and disseminate new ideas that foster greater economic choice and individual responsibility"
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Atlanta
Atlanta
Atlanta
(/ætˈlæntə/) is the capital and most populous city of the state of Georgia in the United States. With an estimated 2016 population of 472,522,[12] it is the cultural and economic center of the Atlanta
Atlanta
metropolitan area, home to 5.8 million people and the ninth-largest metropolitan area in the United States.[6] Atlanta
Atlanta
is the seat of Fulton County and a small portion of the city extends eastward into DeKalb County. Atlanta
Atlanta
was founded as a transportation hub at the intersection of two railroad lines in 1837. After being mostly burned to the ground during the American Civil War, the city rose from its ashes to become a national center of commerce and the unofficial capital of the "New South". During the 1960s, Atlanta
Atlanta
became a major organizing center of the civil rights movement, with Dr
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Baltimore
Baltimore
Baltimore
(/ˈbɔːltɪmɔːr/, locally [ˈbɔɫmɔɻ]) is the largest city in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Maryland, and the 30th-most populous city in the United States. Baltimore
Baltimore
was established by the Constitution of Maryland[9] and is an independent city that is not part of any county. With a population of 611,648 in 2017, Baltimore
Baltimore
is the largest independent city in the United States
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Chicago
Chicago
Chicago
(/ʃɪˈkɑːɡoʊ, -ˈkɔː-/ ( listen)), officially the City
City
of Chicago, is the third most populous city in the United States. With over 2.7 million residents, it is also the most populous city in both the state of Illinois
Illinois
and the Midwestern United States. It is the county seat of Cook County
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Cleveland
Cleveland
Cleveland
(/ˈkliːvlənd/ KLEEV-lənd) is a city in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Ohio, and the county seat of Cuyahoga County,[7] the state's second most-populous county.[8][9] Located along Lake Erie, the city proper has a population of 388,072, making Cleveland
Cleveland
the 51st largest city in the United States,[5] and the second-largest city in Ohio
Ohio
after Columbus.[10][11] Greater Cleveland
Greater Cleveland
ranked as the 32nd-largest metropolitan area in the United States, with 2,055,612 people in 2016.[12] The city anchors the Cleveland–Akron–Canton Combined Statistical Area, which had a population of 3,515,646 in 2010 and ranks 15th in the United States. The city is located on the southern shore of Lake Erie, approximately 60 miles (100 kilometers) west of the Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
state border
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Houston
Houston
Houston
(/ˈhjuːstən/ ( listen) HYOO-stən) is the most populous city in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Texas
Texas
and the fourth-most populous city in the United States, with a census-estimated 2016 population of 2.303 million[2] within a land area of 599.59 square miles (1,552.9 km2).[7] It is the largest city in the Southern United States,[8] and the seat of Harris County. Located in Southeast Texas
Texas
near the Gulf of Mexico, it is the principal city of the Greater Houston
Houston
metro area, which is the fifth-most populated MSA in the United States. Houston
Houston
was founded on August 30, 1836, near the banks of Buffalo Bayou (now known as Allen's Landing)[9][10] and incorporated as a city on June 5, 1837
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Buchanan V. Warley
Buchanan v. Warley, 245 U.S. 60 (1917), is a case in which the Supreme Court of the United States addressed civil government-instituted racial segregation in residential areas. The Court held unanimously that a Louisville, Kentucky
Louisville, Kentucky
city ordinance prohibiting the sale of real property to blacks in white-majority neighborhoods or buildings and vice versa violated the Fourteenth Amendment's protections for freedom of contract. The ruling of the Kentucky
Kentucky
Court of Appeals was thus reversed. Prior state court rulings had overturned racial zoning ordinances on grounds of the "takings clause" because of their failures to grandfather land that had been owned prior to enactment
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Los Angeles
Los AngelesCSA Los Angeles-Long BeachMSA Los Angeles-Long Beach-AnaheimPueblo September 4, 1781[3]City status May 23, 1835[4]Incorporated April 4, 1850[5]Named for Our Lady, Queen of the AngelsGovernment • Type Mayor-Council-Commission[6] • Body Los Angeles
Los Angeles
City Council • Mayor Eric Garcetti[7] • City Attorney Mike Feuer[7] • City Controller Ron Galperin[7]Area[8] • City in California 502.76 sq m
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New York City
Bronx, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Queens, Richmond (Staten Island)Historic colonies New Netherland Province of New YorkSettled 1624Consolidated 1898Named for James, Duke of YorkGovernment[2] • Type Mayor–Council • Body New York City
New York City
Council • Mayor Bill de Blasio
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Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Philadelphia
(/ˌfɪləˈdɛlfiə/) is the largest city in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
and the sixth-most populous city in the United States, with an estimated population of 1,567,872[7] and more than 6 million in the seventh-largest metropolitan statistical area, as of 2016[update].[5] Philadelphia
Philadelphia
is the economic and cultural anchor of the Delaware
Delaware
Valley, located along the lower Delaware
Delaware
and Schuylkill Rivers, within the Northeast megalopolis
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