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Resheph
RESHEPH (also Rešef, Reshef; Canaanite ršp רשף; Eblaite Rašap, Egyptian ršpw) was a deity associated with plague (or a personification of plague) in ancient Canaanite religion . The originally Eblaite and Canaanite deity was adopted into ancient Egyptian religion in the late Bronze Age
Bronze Age
during the Eighteenth Dynasty of Egypt (late 15th century BC) as a god of horses and chariots. In Biblical Hebrew , רֶשֶׁף‎ resheph is a noun interpreted as "flame, lightning" but also "burning fever, plague, pestilence". CONTENTS * 1 Ebla
Ebla
* 2 Ugarit
Ugarit
* 3 Egypt * 4 Hebrew Bible * 5 See also * 6 Notes EBLAThe name is found in the third millennium tablets from Ebla
Ebla
, as Rašap (Ra-ša-ap), listed as divinity of the cities of Atanni, Gunu, Tunip , and Shechem
Shechem

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Levant
Cyprus
Cyprus
Israel
Israel
Iraq
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Ephraim
EPHRAIM /ˈiːfriːəm/ ; (Hebrew : אֶפְרַיִם/אֶפְרָיִם, Standard Efráyim Tiberian ʾEp̄ráyim/ʾEp̄rāyim) was, according to the Book of Genesis
Book of Genesis
, the second son of Joseph and Asenath
Asenath
. Asenath
Asenath
was an Egyptian woman whom Pharaoh
Pharaoh
gave to Joseph as wife, and the daughter of Potipherah , a priest of On . Ephraim
Ephraim
was born in Egypt
Egypt
before the arrival of the children of Israel from Canaan
Canaan
. The Book of Numbers
Book of Numbers
lists three sons of Ephraim: Shuthelah, Beker , and Tahan . However, 1 Chronicles 7 claims that he had at least eight sons, including Ezer and Elead, who were killed by local men who came to rob him of his cattle. After their deaths he had another son, Beriah
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Books Of Chronicles
In the Christian Bible , the two BOOKS OF CHRONICLES (commonly referred to as 1 CHRONICLES and 2 CHRONICLES, or FIRST CHRONICLES and SECOND CHRONICLES) generally follow the two Books of Kings and precede Ezra–Nehemiah
Ezra–Nehemiah
, thus concluding the history-oriented books of the Old Testament , often referred to as the Deuteronomistic history . In the Hebrew Bible , Chronicles is a single book, called Diḇrê Hayyāmîm (Hebrew : דִּבְרֵי־הַיָּמִים‎, "The Matters the Days"), and is the final book of Ketuvim , the third and last part of the Tanakh . Chronicles was divided into two books in the Septuagint and called I and II Paralipoménōn (Greek : Παραλειπομένων, "things left on one side")
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Book Of Habakkuk
The BOOK OF HABAKKUK is the eighth book of the 12 minor prophets of the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
. It is attributed to the prophet Habakkuk
Habakkuk
, and was probably composed in the late 7th century BC. Of the three chapters in the book, the first two are a dialog between Yahweh and the prophet. The central message, that "the just shall live by his faith" (2:4), plays an important role in Christian
Christian
thought. It is used in the Epistle to the Romans
Epistle to the Romans
1:17, Epistle
Epistle
to the Galatians 3:11, and the Epistle to the Hebrews
Epistle to the Hebrews
10:38 as the starting point of the concept of faith . A copy of these chapters is included in the Habakkuk
Habakkuk
Commentary , found among the Dead Sea Scrolls
Dead Sea Scrolls

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Deir El-Medina
DEIR EL-MEDINA (Arabic : دير المدينة‎) is an ancient Egyptian village which was home to the artisans who worked on the tombs in the Valley of the Kings during the 18th to 20th dynasties of the New Kingdom
New Kingdom
period (ca. 1550–1080 BC) The settlement's ancient name was "Set Maat" (translated as "The Place of Truth"), and the workmen who lived there were called “Servants in the Place of Truth”. During the Christian era, the temple of Hathor
Hathor
was converted into a church from which the Arabic name Deir el-Medina ("the monastery of the town") is derived. At the time when the world's press was concentrating on Howard Carter 's discovery of the Tomb of Tutankhamun in 1922, a team led by Bernard Bruyère began to excavate the site. This work has resulted in one of the most thoroughly documented accounts of community life in the ancient world that spans almost four hundred years
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Twentieth Dynasty Of Egypt
The TWENTIETH DYNASTY OF EGYPT (notated DYNASTY XX, alternatively 20TH DYNASTY or DYNASTY 20) is classified as the third and last Dynasty of the Ancient Egyptian New Kingdom period, lasting from 1189 BC to 1077 BC. The 20th Dynasty and the 19th Dynasty furthermore together constitute an era known as the Ramesside period
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Gazelle
Several, see text A GAZELLE is any of many antelope species in the genus GAZELLA or formerly considered to belong to it. Six species are included in two genera , Eudorcas and Nanger , which were formerly considered subgenera . The genus Procapra has also been considered a subgenus of Gazella, and its members are also referred to as gazelles, though they are not dealt with in this article. Gazelles are known as swift animals. Some are able to run at bursts as high as 100 km/h (60 mph) or run at a sustained speed of 50 km/h (30 mph). Gazelles are found mostly in the deserts, grasslands, and savannas of Africa
Africa
; but they are also found in southwest and central Asia and the Indian subcontinent . They tend to live in herds, and eat less coarse, easily digestible plants and leaves. Gazelles are rather small antelopes, most standing 60–110 cm (2–3.5 ft) high at the shoulder, and are generally fawn-colored
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New Kingdom Of Egypt
The NEW KINGDOM OF EGYPT, also referred to as the EGYPTIAN EMPIRE, is the period in ancient Egyptian history between the 16th century BC and the 11th century BC, covering the Eighteenth , Nineteenth , and Twentieth Dynasties of Egypt
Egypt
. Radiocarbon dating places the exact beginning of the New Kingdom between 1570 BC and 1544 BC. The New Kingdom followed the Second Intermediate Period and was succeeded by the Third Intermediate Period . It was Egypt
Egypt
's most prosperous time and marked the peak of its power. The later part of this period, under the Nineteenth and Twentieth Dynasties (1292–1069 BC) is also known as the Ramesside period. It is named after the eleven pharaohs that took the name of Ramesses I , founder of the 19th Dynasty
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Amenhotep II
AMENHOTEP II (sometimes called Amenophis II and meaning Amun
Amun
is Satisfied) was the seventh Pharaoh
Pharaoh
of the 18th dynasty of Egypt . Amenhotep inherited a vast kingdom from his father Thutmose III
Thutmose III
, and held it by means of a few military campaigns in Syria
Syria
; however, he fought much less than his father, and his reign saw the effective cessation of hostilities between Egypt and Mitanni
Mitanni
, the major kingdoms vying for power in Syria. His reign is usually dated from 1427 to 1401 BC . CONTENTS * 1 Family and early life * 2 Dates and length of reign * 3 Foreign affairs * 4 Construction projects * 4.1 Tomb * 5 Personality and later life * 6 See also * 7 Footnotes * 8 References * 9 External links FAMILY AND EARLY LIFE Foundation tablet
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Chariot
A CHARIOT is a type of carriage driven by a charioteer using primarily horses to provide rapid motive power. Chariots were used by armies as transport or mobile archery platforms, for hunting or for racing, and as a conveniently fast way to travel for many ancient people. The word "chariot" comes from the Latin
Latin
CARRUS, itself a loanword from Gaulish
Gaulish
. A chariot of war or one used in military parades was called a car. In ancient Rome and some other ancient Mediterranean civilizations , a biga required two horses, a triga three, and a quadriga four. The horse chariot was a fast, light, open, two-wheeled conveyance drawn by two or more horses that were hitched side by side, and was little more than a floor with a waist-high guard at the front and sides
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Teman (Edom)
TEMAN (Hebrew : תימן‎‎), was the name of an Edomite clan and of its eponym, according to the Bible and an ancient biblical town of Arabia Petraea . The term is also traditionally applied to Yemenite Jews , and is used as the Hebrew name of Yemen
Yemen
. In the Book of Genesis
Book of Genesis
, Genesis 36:15, the name Teman is referred to a son of Eliphaz , Esau 's eldest son. Job 's friend Eliphaz was a Temani (Job 2:11). LOCATIONAccording to bibleatlas.org and author W. Ewing, Teman or te'-man (תימן) means "on the right," i.e. "south" (Thaiman) and it is the name of a district and town in the land of Edom , named after Teman the grandson of Esau , the son of his firstborn, Eliphaz . A duke Teman is named among the chiefs or clans of Edom. He does not however appear first, in the place of the firstborn
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Desert Of Paran
The DESERT OF PARAN or WILDERNESS OF PARAN (also sometimes spelled PHARAN or FARAN; Hebrew מדבר פארן Midbar Pa'ran), is a location mentioned in the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
. It is one of the places where the Israelites
Israelites
spent part of their 40 years of wandering after the Exodus , and was also a home to Ishmael
Ishmael
, and a place of refuge for David
David
. In Arabic tradition it has often been equated with an area of the Hejaz
Hejaz
, around Mecca
Mecca
, linked to Ishmael
Ishmael
and Abraham
Abraham

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International Standard Book Number
The INTERNATIONAL STANDARD BOOK NUMBER (ISBN) is a unique numeric commercial book identifier. An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book , a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-based and varies from country to country, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN configuration of recognition was generated in 1967 based upon the 9-digit STANDARD BOOK NUMBERING (SBN) created in 1966. The 10-digit ISBN format was developed by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and was published in 1970 as international standard ISO 2108 (the SBN code can be converted to a ten digit ISBN by prefixing it with a zero)
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a DIGITAL OBJECT IDENTIFIER or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
( ISO
ISO
). An implementation of the Handle System , DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL , indicating where the object can be found
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JSTOR
JSTOR
JSTOR
(/ˈdʒeɪstɔːr/ JAY-stor ; short for Journal Storage) is a digital library founded in 1995. Originally containing digitized back issues of academic journals , it now also includes books and primary sources, and current issues of journals. It provides full-text searches of almost 2,000 journals. As of 2013, more than 8,000 institutions in more than 160 countries had access to JSTOR; most access is by subscription, but some older public domain content is freely available to anyone. JSTOR's revenue was $69 million in 2014. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Content * 3 Access * 3.1 Aaron Swartz incident * 3.2 Limitations * 3.3 Increasing public access * 4 Use * 5 See also * 6 References * 7 Further reading * 8 External links HISTORY William G. Bowen , president of Princeton University from 1972 to 1988, founded JSTOR
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