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Resheph
Resheph
Resheph
(also Rešef, Reshef; Canaanite ršp רשף; Eblaite Rašap, Egyptian ršpw) was a deity associated with plague (or a personification of plague) in ancient Canaanite religion. The originally Eblaite and Canaanite deity was adopted into ancient Egyptian religion in the late Bronze Age
Bronze Age
during the Eighteenth Dynasty of Egypt (late 15th century BC) as a god of horses and chariots. In Biblical Hebrew, רֶשֶׁף‬ resheph is a noun interpreted as "flame, lightning" but also "burning fever, plague, pestilence".[1]Contents1 Ebla 2 Ugarit 3 Egypt 4 Hebrew Bible 5 See also 6 NotesEbla[edit]ršpw in hieroglyphsThe name is found in the third millennium tablets from Ebla, as Rašap (Ra-ša-ap), listed as divinity of the cities of Atanni, Gunu, Tunip, and Shechem
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King James Version
The King James Version
King James Version
(KJV), also known as the King James Bible
Bible
(KJB) or simply the Authorized Version (AV), is an English translation of the Christian Bible
Bible
for the Church of England, begun in 1604 and completed in 1611.[a] The books of the King James Version
King James Version
include the 39 books of the Old Testament, an intertestamental section containing 14 books of the Apocrypha and the 27 books of the New Testament. It was first printed by the King's Printer Robert Barker and was the third translation into English approved by the English Church authorities
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Twentieth Dynasty Of Egypt
The Twentieth Dynasty of Egypt
Twentieth Dynasty of Egypt
(notated Dynasty XX, alternatively 20th Dynasty or Dynasty 20) is classified as the third and last dynasty of the Ancient Egyptian New Kingdom period, lasting from 1189 BC to 1077 BC. The 19th and 20th Dynasties furthermore together constitute an era known as the Ramesside period. Contents1 History1.1 Background 1.2 20th Dynasty1.2.1 Setnakhte 1.2.2 Ramesses III 1.2.3 Ramesses IV 1.2.4 Ramesses V 1.2.5 Ramesses VI 1.2.6 Ramesses VII 1.2.7 Ramesses VIII 1.2.8 Ramesses IX 1.2.9 Ramesses X 1.2.10 Ramesses XI1.3 Decline2 Pharaohs of the 20th Dynasty 3 Timeline of the 20th Dynasty 4 Pharaonic Family tree 5 Gallery of images 6 See also 7 ReferencesHistory[edit] Background[edit] Upon the death of the last pharaoh of the 19th Dynasty, Queen Twosret, Egypt descended into a period of civil war, as attested by the Elephantine stela built by Setnakhte
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Kirta
Kirta is a legendary Hurrian
Hurrian
king. He is thought to have founded the dynasty of Mitanni, but no contemporary inscriptions from his time are known to exist. He may have lived around 1500 BC. The Epic of Keret or "Legend of Keret" from the clay tablets of Ugarit tells the story of the near-extinction of the royal house of Keret. Though it was written much after and by a hostile country to the descendants of the king. The text goes thus. All of his children died and his wife "departed." In a dream, the creator god, El, instructs him to appeal for help from the rain god, Baal, and then launch an expedition to find a new wife. He journeys and on the way comes to the shrine of the mother goddess Asherah. He promises to give the goddess an offering of a golden statue if he finds a wife. Kirta finds a wife and has several children, but forgets his promise to Asherah
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GAZelle
Several, see textA gazelle is any of many antelope species in the genus Gazella or formerly considered to belong to it. Six species are included in two genera, Eudorcas
Eudorcas
and Nanger, which were formerly considered subgenera. The genus Procapra has also been considered a subgenus of Gazella, and its members are also referred to as gazelles, though they are not dealt with in this article. Gazelles are known as swift animals. Some are able to run at bursts as high as 100 km/h (60 mph) or run at a sustained speed of 50 km/h (30 mph).[1] Gazelles are found mostly in the deserts, grasslands, and savannas of Africa; but they are also found in southwest and central Asia and the Indian subcontinent
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Canaanite Languages
The Canaanite languages or Canaanite dialects[2] are one of the four subgroups of the Northwest Semitic languages, the others being Aramaic, Ugaritic
Ugaritic
and Amorite. They were spoken by the ancient Semitic people of the Canaan
Canaan
and Levant
Levant
regions, an area encompassing what are today Israel, Jordan, Sinai, Lebanon, Syria, the Palestinian territories, and also some fringe areas of southern Turkey
Turkey
and the northern Arabian peninsula. The Canaanites
Canaanites
are broadly defined to include the Israelites
Israelites
(including Judeans
Judeans
and Samaritans), Phoenicians (including Carthaginians), Amorites, Ammonites, Moabites, Edomites, Suteans, Ekronites, and Amalekites
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New Kingdom Of Egypt
The New Kingdom of Egypt, also referred to as the Egyptian Empire, is the period in ancient Egyptian history between the 16th century BC and the 11th century BC, covering the 18th, 19th, and 20th Dynasties of Egypt. Radiocarbon dating places the exact beginning of the New Kingdom between 1570 BC and 1544 BC.[1] The New Kingdom followed the Second Intermediate Period and was succeeded by the Third Intermediate Period. It was Egypt's most prosperous time and marked the peak of its power.[2] The later part of this period, under the 19th and 20th Dynasties (1292–1069 BC), is also known as the Ramesside period
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Amenhotep II
Amenhotep II
Amenhotep II
(sometimes called Amenophis II and meaning Amun
Amun
is Satisfied) was the seventh Pharaoh
Pharaoh
of the 18th dynasty of Egypt. Amenhotep inherited a vast kingdom from his father Thutmose III, and held it by means of a few military campaigns in Syria; however, he fought much less than his father, and his reign saw the effective cessation of hostilities between Egypt and Mitanni, the major kingdoms vying for power in Syria. His reign is usually dated from 1427 to 1401 BC.Contents1 Family and early life 2 Dates and length of reign 3 Foreign affairs 4 Construction projects4.1 Tomb5 Personality and later life 6 See also 7 Footnotes 8 References 9 External linksFamily and early life[edit]Foundation tablet. It shows the cartouche of the birth name and epithet "Amenhotep, the god, the Ruler of Thebes". 18th Dynasty. From Kurna, Egypt
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Chariot
A chariot is a type of carriage driven by a charioteer using primarily horses[a] to provide rapid motive power. Chariots were used by armies as transport or mobile archery platforms, for hunting or for racing, and as a conveniently fast way to travel for many ancient people. The word "chariot" comes from the Latin
Latin
term carrus, a loanword from Gaulish. A chariot of war or one used in military parades was called a car. In ancient Rome and some other ancient Mediterranean civilizations, a biga required two horses, a triga three, and a quadriga four. The horse chariot was a fast, light, open, two-wheeled conveyance drawn by two or more horses that were hitched side by side, and was little more than a floor with a waist-high guard at the front and sides
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Deir El-Medina
Deir el-Medina
Deir el-Medina
(Arabic: دير المدينة‎) is an ancient Egyptian village which was home to the artisans who worked on the tombs in the Valley of the Kings
Valley of the Kings
during the 18th to 20th dynasties of the New Kingdom
New Kingdom
period (ca
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Book Of Job
The Book
Book
of Job
Job
(/dʒoʊb/; Hebrew: אִיוֹב Iyov) is a book in the Ketuvim
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Levant
 Cyprus  Israel  Iraq  Jordan  Lebanon  Palestine  Syria   Turkey
Turkey
(Hatay Province)Broader definition Egypt  Greece   Cyrenaica
Cyrenaica
(Libya)   Turkey
Turkey
(whole territory)Population 44,550,926[a]Demonym LevantineLanguages Levantine Arabic, Hebrew, Aramaic, Armenian, Circassian, Greek, Kurdish, Ladino, Turkish, DomariTime Zones UTC+02:00 (EET) ( Turkey
Turkey
and Cyprus)Largest citiesDamascus Amman Aleppo Baghdad Beirut Gaza Jerusalem Tel AvivThe Levant
Levant
(/ləˈvænt/) is an approximate historical geographical term referring to a large area in the Eastern Mediterranean. In its narrowest sense it is equivalent to the historical region of Syria
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Ephraim
Ephraim
Ephraim
/ˈiːfriːəm/;[1] (Hebrew: אֶפְרַיִם/אֶפְרָיִם, Standard Efráyim Tiberian ʾEp̄ráyim/ʾEp̄rāyim) was, according to the Book of Genesis, the second son of Joseph and Asenath. Asenath
Asenath
was an Egyptian woman whom Pharaoh
Pharaoh
gave to Joseph as wife, and the daughter of Potipherah, a priest of On.[2] Ephraim
Ephraim
was born in Egypt
Egypt
before the arrival of the children of Israel from Canaan.[3] The Book of Numbers
Book of Numbers
lists three sons of Ephraim: Shuthelah, Beker, and Tahan.[4] However, 1 Chronicles 7 claims that he had at least eight sons, including Ezer and Elead, who were killed by local men who came to rob him of his cattle
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Books Of Chronicles
In the Christian Bible, the two Books of Chronicles
Books of Chronicles
(commonly referred to as 1 Chronicles and 2 Chronicles, or First Chronicles and Second Chronicles) generally follow the two Books of Kings
Books of Kings
and precede Ezra–Nehemiah, thus concluding the history-oriented books of the Old Testament,[1] often referred to as the Deuteronomistic history. In the Hebrew Bible, Chronicles is a single book, called Diḇrê Hayyāmîm (Hebrew: דִּבְרֵי־הַיָּמִים‬, "The Matters [of] the Days"), and is the final book of Ketuvim, the third and last part of the Tanakh
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Book Of Habakkuk
The Book
Book
of Habakkuk
Habakkuk
is the eighth book of the 12 minor prophets of the Hebrew Bible.[1] It is attributed to the prophet Habakkuk, and was probably composed in the late 7th century BC. Of the three chapters in the book, the first two are a dialog between Yahweh
Yahweh
and the prophet. The central message, that "the just shall live by his faith" (2:4)[2][citation needed], plays an important role in Christian
Christian
thought. It is used in the Epistle
Epistle
to the Romans, Epistle
Epistle
to the Galatians, and the Epistle to the Hebrews
Epistle to the Hebrews
as the starting point of the concept of faith.[1] A copy of these chapters is included in the Habakkuk
Habakkuk
Commentary, found among the Dead Sea Scrolls
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Septuagint
Outline of Bible-related topics   Bible
Bible
book    Bible
Bible
portalv t eFragment of a Septuagint: A column of uncial book from 1 Esdras
1 Esdras
in the Codex Vaticanus
Codex Vaticanus
c. 325–350 CE, the basis of Sir Lancelot Charles Lee Brenton's Greek edition and English translation.The Septuagint
Septuagint
(from the Latin
Latin
septuaginta, "seventy"), also known as the LXX, is a Koine Greek
Koine Greek
translation of a Hebraic textual tradition that included certain texts which were later included in the canonical Hebrew Bible
Bible
and other related texts which were not. As the primary Greek translation of the Old Testament, it is also called the Greek Old Testament
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