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Reingard
This is a partial list of meanings of minor planet names. See meanings of minor planet names for a list of all such partial lists. As minor planet discoveries are confirmed, they are given a permanent number by the IAU's Minor Planet Center, and the discoverers can then submit names for them, following the IAU's naming conventions. The list below concerns those minor planets in the specified number-range that have received names, and explains the meanings of those names. Besides the Minor Planet Circulars (in which the citations are published), a key source is Lutz D. Schmadel's Dictionary of Minor Planet Names.[1][2][3] Meanings that do not quote a reference (the "†" links) are tentative
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Meanings Of Minor Planet Names
This is a list of minor planets which have been officially named by the Minor Planet Center (MPC). The list consists of partial pages, each covering a number range of 1000 bodies citing the source after each minor planet was named for. An overview of all existing partial pages is given in section § Index. Among the hundreds of thousands numbered minor planets only a small fraction have received a name so far. As of 2017, there are more than 20,000 named minor planets out of a total of half a million numbered ones (also see List of minor planets
List of minor planets
§ Main index as numbers increase constantly).[1] Most of these bodies are named for people, in particular astronomers, as well as figures from mythology and fiction. Many minor planets are also named after places such cities, towns and villages, mountains and volcanoes; after rivers, observatories, as well as organizations, clubs and astronomical societies
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List Of Minor Planets
This is a list of numbered minor planets in the Solar System, in numerical order. As of April 2018[update] there are 757,626 minor planets of which 516,386 are numbered (secured discoveries). Every month, several thousand minor planets are newly numbered and added to this list (see index).[1][2] It is expected that the upcoming survey by the LSST
LSST
will discover another 5 million minor planets during the next ten years—a tenfold increase from current numbers.[3] While all asteroids with a diameter above 10 kilometers have already been discovered, there might be as many as 10 trillion 1-meter-sized asteroids or larger out to the orbit of Jupiter;[4] and more than a trillion minor planets in the Kuiper belt. There are 21,264 named minor planets mostly for people and figures from mythology and fiction.[2] Approximately 96% of all numbered objects remain unnamed
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Royal Astronomical Society Of Canada
The Royal Astronomical Society of Canada
Canada
(RASC) is a national, non-profit, charitable organization devoted to the advancement of astronomy and related sciences. At present, there are 29 local branches of the Society, called Centres, located in towns and cities across the country from St. John's, Newfoundland, to Victoria, British Columbia, and as far north as Whitehorse, Yukon. There are about 4600 members from coast to coast to coast, and internationally. The membership is composed primarily of amateurs and also includes numerous professional astronomers and astronomy educators
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James Whitney Young
James Whitney Young (born January 24, 1941) is an American astronomer who worked in the field of asteroid research. After nearly 47 years with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Jet Propulsion Laboratory
at their Table Mountain Facility, Young retired July 16, 2009. He was a very prolific minor planet-observer of both physical properties and astrometric positions, and had discovered more than 250 asteroids since 2002,[1] most of them from the main-belt, as well as several near-Earth objects, Mars-crossers and Jupiter
Jupiter
trojans
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Rolf Apitzsch
This is a list of all astronomers who are credited by the Minor Planet Center (MPC) with the discovery of one or several minor planets.[1] A second table lists all institutional discoverers of minor planets such as observatories and surveys (see § Discovering dedicated institutions). As of March 2018[update], the MPC credits a total of 514,567 numbered minor planets to 1014 astronomers and 234 institutional discoverers (e.g. observatories, telescopes and surveys), respectively. For a detailed description of the table's content, see § Notes.Contents1 Discovering astronomers 2 Discovering dedicated institutions 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksDiscovering astronomers[edit]Astronomer Discoveries DOB–DOD Country Link-label; info, links, and notes Name(s) at MPC CiteHiroshi Abe (astronomer) 28 1958–pres.H. Abe; H. Abe MPCMasanao Abe 2 1967–pres.M. Abe; disc: MPC and MPC M. Abe MPCMark Abraham (astronomer) 3 n.a.M. Abraham; amateur, Src M
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Minor Planet
A minor planet is an astronomical object in direct orbit around the Sun
Sun
(or more broadly, any star with a planetary system) that is neither a planet nor exclusively classified as a comet.[a] Before 2006 the International Astronomical Union
International Astronomical Union
(IAU) officially used the term minor planet, but during that year's meeting it reclassified minor planets and comets into dwarf planets and small Solar System
Solar System
bodies (SSSBs).[1] Minor planets can be dwarf planets, asteroids, trojans, centaurs, Kuiper belt
Kuiper belt
objects, and other trans-Neptunian objects.[2] As of 2018, the orbits of 757,626 minor planets were archived at the Minor Planet Center, 516,386 of which had received permanent numbers (for the complete list, see index).[3] The first minor planet to be discovered was Ceres in 1801
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Stevie Wonder
Stevland Hardaway Morris (né Judkins; born May 13, 1950),[1] known by his stage name Stevie Wonder, is an American musician, singer, songwriter, record producer, and multi-instrumentalist. A child prodigy, he is considered to be one of the most critically and commercially successful musical performers of the late 20th century.[2] Wonder signed with Motown's Tamla
Tamla
label at the age of 11,[2] and he continued performing and recording for Motown
Motown
into the 2010s. He has been blind since shortly after birth.[3] Among Wonder's works are singles such as "Signed, Sealed, Delivered I'm Yours", "Superstition", "Sir Duke", "You Are the Sunshine of My Life" and "I Just Called to Say I Love You"; and albums such as Talking Book, Innervisions
Innervisions
and Songs in the Key of Life.[2] He has recorded more than 30 U.S
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Giancarlo Fagioli
This is a list of all astronomers who are credited by the Minor Planet Center (MPC) with the discovery of one or several minor planets.[1] A second table lists all institutional discoverers of minor planets such as observatories and surveys (see § Discovering dedicated institutions). As of March 2018[update], the MPC credits a total of 514,567 numbered minor planets to 1014 astronomers and 234 institutional discoverers (e.g. observatories, telescopes and surveys), respectively. For a detailed description of the table's content, see § Notes.Contents1 Discovering astronomers 2 Discovering dedicated institutions 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksDiscovering astronomers[edit]Astronomer Discoveries DOB–DOD Country Link-label; info, links, and notes Name(s) at MPC CiteHiroshi Abe (astronomer) 28 1958–pres.H. Abe; H. Abe MPCMasanao Abe 2 1967–pres.M. Abe; disc: MPC and MPC M. Abe MPCMark Abraham (astronomer) 3 n.a.M. Abraham; amateur, Src M
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Markus Griesser (astronomer)
This is a list of all astronomers who are credited by the Minor Planet Center (MPC) with the discovery of one or several minor planets.[1] A second table lists all institutional discoverers of minor planets such as observatories and surveys (see § Discovering dedicated institutions). As of March 2018[update], the MPC credits a total of 514,567 numbered minor planets to 1014 astronomers and 234 institutional discoverers (e.g. observatories, telescopes and surveys), respectively. For a detailed description of the table's content, see § Notes.Contents1 Discovering astronomers 2 Discovering dedicated institutions 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksDiscovering astronomers[edit]Astronomer Discoveries DOB–DOD Country Link-label; info, links, and notes Name(s) at MPC CiteHiroshi Abe (astronomer) 28 1958–pres.H. Abe; H. Abe MPCMasanao Abe 2 1967–pres.M. Abe; disc: MPC and MPC M. Abe MPCMark Abraham (astronomer) 3 n.a.M. Abraham; amateur, Src M
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Lutz D. Schmadel
Lutz D. Schmadel (July 2, 1942 in Berlin
Berlin
– October 21, 2016)[2][3][4] was a German astronomer and a prolific discoverer of asteroids, who worked at the Astronomisches Rechen-Institut
Astronomisches Rechen-Institut
(ARI) of the University of Heidelberg.[5] His special interest was the astrometry of minor planets. Among his numerous discoveries were the three main-belt asteroids 8661 Ratzinger, 10114 Greifswald and 11508 Stolte.[6][7][8] He was the author of Dictionary of Minor Planet Names (see below) a reference book containing information about the discovery and naming of 12,804 asteroids (March 2006)
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International Astronomical Union
The International
International
Astronomical Union (IAU; French: Union astronomique internationale, UAI) is an international association of professional astronomers, at the PhD level and beyond, active in professional research and education in astronomy.[2] Among other activities, it acts as the internationally recognized authority for assigning designations to celestial bodies (stars, planets, asteroids, etc.) and any surface features on them.[3] The IAU is a member of the International
International
Council for Science (ICSU). Its main objective is to promote and safeguard the science of astronomy in all its aspects through international cooperation. The IAU maintains friendly relations with organizations that include amateur astronomers in their membership
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Minor Planet Center
The Minor Planet Center (MPC) is the official worldwide organization in charge of collecting observational data for minor planets (such as asteroids and comets), calculating their orbits and publishing this information via the Minor Planet Circulars. Under the auspices of the International Astronomical Union
International Astronomical Union
(IAU), it operates at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, which is part of the Center for Astrophysics along with the Harvard College Observatory.[1] The MPC runs a number of free online services for observers to assist them in observing minor planets and comets. The complete catalogue of minor planet orbits (sometimes referred to as the "Minor Planet Catalogue") may also be freely downloaded. In addition to astrometric data, the MPC collects light curve photometry of minor planets
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Astronomical Naming Conventions
In ancient times, only the Sun
Sun
and Moon, a few hundred stars and the most easily visible planets had names. Over the last few hundred years, the number of identified astronomical objects has risen from hundreds to over a billion, and more are discovered every year. Astronomers need to be able to assign systematic designations to unambiguously identify all of these objects, and at the same time give names to the most interesting objects and, where relevant, features of those objects. The International Astronomical Union
International Astronomical Union
(IAU) is the officially recognized authority in astronomy for assigning designations to celestial bodies such as stars, planets, and minor planets, including any surface features on them
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Wiesendangen
Wiesendangen
Wiesendangen
is a municipality in the district of Winterthur
Winterthur
in the canton of Zürich in Switzerland. On 1 January 2014 the former municipality of Bertschikon merged into the municipality of Wiesendangen. At the same time the Community Identification Number changed from 0229 to 0298[3]Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Demographics 4 Transport 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Wiesendangen
Wiesendangen
municipality (as of 2014) includes the former villages, hamlets or municipalities of: Wiesendangen, Attikon, Wallikon, Menzengrüt, Buch, Bertschikon, Gundetswil, Kefikon, Liebensberg, Stegen, Gündlikon and Zünikon. It is located on the site of Roman estates built in the 2nd and 3rd centuries along the road between Oberwinterthur and Pfyn. The area was acquired by St. Gallen Abbey
St. Gallen Abbey
in 804
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