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Regius Professor Of Engineering (Edinburgh)
The Regius Chair of Engineering is a royal professorship in engineering, established since 1868 in the University of Edinburgh, Scotland. The Chair is attached to the university's College of Science & Engineering, based in the King's Buildings in Edinburgh. Appointment to the Regius Chair is by Royal Warrant from the British monarch, on the recommendation of Scotland's First Minister. History of the Chair[edit] Regius professorships are a unique feature of academia in the British Isles. The first Regius professorship was in the field of medicine, and founded by the Scottish King James IV at Aberdeen University in 1497. Regius Chairs have since been instituted in a variety of academic disciplines in various universities. Each was established by a British monarch, and — except in Ireland — the current monarch still officially appoints the professor (following proper advertisement and interview, through the offices of the university and the national government)
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Royal Academy Of Engineering
The Royal Academy of Engineering
Engineering
is the UK’s national academy of engineering. The Academy brings together the UK's leading engineers, from across all engineering sectors, to advance and promote excellence in engineering. The Academy was founded in June 1976 as the Fellowship of Engineering with support from Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, who became the first Senior Fellow and, as of 2017[update], remains so. The Fellowship was incorporated and granted a Royal Charter
Royal Charter
on 17 May 1983 and became the Royal Academy of Engineering
Engineering
on 16 March 1992
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Faraday Medal
The Faraday Medal
Faraday Medal
is the top medal awarded by the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) (previously called the Institution of Electrical Engineers).[1][2][3] It is part of the IET Achievement Medals collection of awards.[4] The medal is named after the famous Michael Faraday
Michael Faraday
FRS, the father of electromagnetism. Faraday is widely recognized as a top scientist, engineer, chemist, and inventor
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OBE
The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire
British Empire
is a British order of chivalry, rewarding contributions to the arts and sciences, work with charitable and welfare organisations, and public service outside the Civil service.[2] It was established on 4 June 1917 by King George V, and comprises five classes across both civil and military divisions, the most senior two of which make the recipient either a knight if male or dame if female.[3] There is also the related British Empire Medal, whose recipients are affiliated with, but not members of, the order. Recommendations for appointments to the Order of the British Empire were at first made on the nomination of the United Kingdom, the self-governing Dominions
Dominions
of the Empire (later Commonwealth) and the Viceroy of India
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Multiscale Modeling
In engineering, mathematics, physics, chemistry, bioinformatics, computational biology, meteorology and computer science, multiscale modeling or multiscale mathematics is the field of solving problems which have important features at multiple scales of time and/or space. Important problems include multiscale modeling of fluids,[1][2] solids,[2][3] polymers,[4][5] proteins,[6][7][8][9] nucleic acids[10] as well as various physical and chemical phenomena (like adsorption, chemical reactions, diffusion).[8][11][12]Contents1 History 2 Areas of research 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Horstemeyer 2009,[13] 2012[14] presented a historical review of the different disciplines (solid mechanics,[15] numerical methods,[16] mathematics, physics, and materials science) for solid materials related to multiscale materials modeling.The recent surge of multiscale modeling from the smallest scale (atoms) to full system level (e.g., autos) related to soli
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Microfluidics
Microfluidics
Microfluidics
deals with the behaviour, precise control and manipulation of fluids that are geometrically constrained to a small, typically sub-millimeter, scale
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Nanofluidics
Nanofluidics
Nanofluidics
is the study of the behavior, manipulation, and control of fluids that are confined to structures of nanometer (typically 1–100 nm) characteristic dimensions (1 nm = 10−9 m). Fluids confined in these structures exhibit physical behaviors not observed in larger structures, such as those of micrometer dimensions and above, because the characteristic physical scaling lengths of the fluid, (e.g. Debye length, hydrodynamic radius) very closely coincide with the dimensions of the nanostructure itself. When structures approach the size regime corresponding to molecular scaling lengths, new physical constraints are placed on the behavior of the fluid
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Philip Leverhulme Prize
The Philip Leverhulme Prize is awarded by the Leverhulme Trust
Leverhulme Trust
to recognise the achievement of outstanding researchers whose work has already attracted international recognition and whose future career is exceptionally promising. The prize scheme makes up to thirty awards of £100,000 a year, across a range of academic disciplines.[1][2]Contents1 History and criteria 2 Awards2.1 2017 2.2 2016 2.3 2015 2.4 2014 2.5 2013 2.6 2012 2.7 2011 2.8 2010 2.9 2009 2.10 2008 2.11 2007 2.12 2006 2.13 2005 2.14 2004 2.15 2003 2.16 2002 2.17 20013 ReferencesHistory and criteria[edit] The award is named after Philip Leverhulme who died in 2000. He was the grandson of William Leverhulme, and was the third Viscount Leverhulme.[1] The prizes are payable, in instalments, over a period of two to three years
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Leverhulme Trust
The Leverhulme Trust
Leverhulme Trust
(/ˈliːvərhjuːm/) is a large national grant-making foundation in the United Kingdom
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Royal Society Of Edinburgh
Edinburgh
Edinburgh
(/ˈɛdɪnb(ə)rə/ ( listen);[6][7][8] Scottish Gaelic: Dùn Èideann [ˈt̪uːn ˈeːtʲən̪ˠ]; Scots: Edinburgh) is the capital city of Scotland
Scotland
and one of its 32 council areas. It is located in Lothian
Lothian
on the Firth of Forth's southern shore. Recognised as the capital of Scotland
Scotland
since at least the 15th century, Edinburgh
Edinburgh
is the seat of the Scottish Government, the Scottish Parliament and the supreme courts of Scotland. The city's Palace of Holyroodhouse is the official residence of the Monarchy in Scotland. Historically part of the county of Midlothian, the city has long been a centre of education, particularly in the fields of medicine, Scots law, literature, the sciences and engineering
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University Of Strathclyde
The University of Strathclyde
University of Strathclyde
is a public research university located in Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom. Founded in 1796 as the Andersonian Institute, it is Glasgow's second-oldest university, with the university receiving its royal charter in 1964 as the UK's first technological university. It takes its name from the historic Kingdom of Strathclyde. The University of Strathclyde
University of Strathclyde
is Scotland's third-largest university by number of students, with students and staff from over 100 countries.[4] The institution was awarded University of the Year 2012[5] and Entrepreneurial University of the year 2013 by Times Higher Education
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Queen Victoria
Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria; 24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was Queen of the United Kingdom
Queen of the United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Ireland from 20 June 1837 until her death. On 1 May 1876, she adopted the additional title of Empress of India. Victoria was the daughter of Prince Edward, Duke of Kent and Strathearn, the fourth son of King George III. Both the Duke of Kent and King George III
King George III
died in 1820, and Victoria was raised under close supervision by her German-born mother, Princess Victoria of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld. She inherited the throne at the age of 18, after her father's three elder brothers had all died, leaving no surviving legitimate children. The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
was already an established constitutional monarchy, in which the sovereign held relatively little direct political power
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Doctor Of Medicine
A Doctor of Medicine
Medicine
(MD from Latin Medicinae Doctor) is a medical degree, the meaning of which varies between different jurisdictions. In some countries, the MD denotes a first professional graduate degree awarded upon initial graduation from medical school.[1] In other countries, the MD denotes an academic research doctorate, higher doctorate, honorary doctorate or advanced clinical coursework degree restricted to medical graduates; in those countries, the equivalent first professional degree is titled differently (for example, Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of
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FRSE
Fellowship of the Royal Society of Edinburgh
Royal Society of Edinburgh
(FRSE) is an award granted to individuals that the Royal Society of Edinburgh, Scotland judges to be "eminently distinguished in their subject".[1] Elections[edit] Around 50 new fellows are elected each year in March.[1] As of 2016[update] there are around 1650 Fellows, including 71 Honorary Fellows (HFRSE) and 76 Corresponding Fellows.[1][2] Fellows are entitled to use the post-nominal letters FRSE. Fellowship[edit] Examples of fellows include Peter Higgs
Peter Higgs
and Jocelyn Bell Burnell.[1] Previous fellows have included Melvin Calvin, Benjamin Franklin, and James Clerk Maxwell, and James Watt.[3] See the Category:Fellows of the Royal Society of Edinburgh
Royal Society of Edinburgh
for more examples
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