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Redstone Old Fort
Redstone Old Fort
Fort
— or Redstone Fort[1] or (for a short time when built) Fort
Fort
Burd[1] — on the Nemacolin Trail, was the name of the French and Indian War-era wooden fort built in 1759 by Pennsylvania militia colonel James Burd
James Burd
to guard the ancient Indian trail's river ford on a mound overlooking the eastern shore of the Monongahela River (colloquially, just "the Mon") in what is now Fayette County, Pennsylvania near, or (more likely) on the banks of Dunlap's Creek at the confluence
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President Of The United States
House of RepresentativesSpeaker Paul Ryan
Paul Ryan
(R)Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R)Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi
Nancy Pelosi
(D)Co
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Sandy Creek (Ohio River)
Sandy Creek is a tributary of the Ohio River
Ohio River
in western West Virginia in the United States. Via the Ohio River, it is part of the watershed of the Mississippi River, draining an area of 124 square miles (320 km2)[5] on the unglaciated portion of the Allegheny Plateau. The creek is 22 miles (35 km) long, or 38.3 miles (61.6 km) including its Left Fork.[6] Sandy Creek is formed in north-central Jackson County by the confluence of its left and right forks:The Left Fork Sandy Creek,[2] 16.3 miles (26.2 km) long,[6] rises south of the community of Rockport in extreme southeastern Wood County, and flows south-southwestward through the western extremity of Wirt County into Jackson County, through the communities of Wiseburg, Lockhart, Drift Run, Odaville, and Sandyville. The Left Fork is paralleled for most of its course by the former U.S. Route 21
U.S

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Religious Society Of Friends
Quakers
Quakers
(or Friends) are members of a historically Christian group of religious movements formally known as the Religious Society of Friends or Friends Church.[2] Members of the various Quaker movements are all generally united in a belief in the ability of each human being to experientially access "the light within", or "that of God
God
in every person". Some may profess the priesthood of all believers, a doctrine derived from the First Epistle of Peter.[3][4][5][6] They include those with evangelical, holiness, liberal, and traditional Quaker understandings of Christianity. There are also Nontheist Quakers whose spiritual practice is not reliant on the existence of a Christian God
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Ford (crossing)
A ford is a shallow place with good footing where a river or stream may be crossed by wading, or inside a vehicle getting its wheels wet.[1] A ford is mostly a natural phenomenon, in contrast to a low water crossing, which is an artificial bridge that allows crossing a river or stream when water is low.Contents1 Description1.1 Watersplash2 Location names 3 Famous battles3.1 In fiction4 Gallery 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksDescription[edit] A ford is a much cheaper form of river crossing than a bridge, but it may become impassable after heavy rain or during flood conditions. A ford is therefore normally only suitable for very minor roads (and for paths intended for walkers and horse riders etc.)
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Jacob Bowman
Captain (John) Jacob Bowman, Sr., (December 2, 1733 - June 20, 1781) was an 18th century American pioneer, grandson of Jost Hite, Colonial Militia officer of Virginia Colony, veteran of the French and Indian War, City of Strasburg Trustee, large land owner in Virginia and South Carolina, a South Carolina State Representative (Third Whig), District 96 Road Commissioner and Revolutionary War Patriot noted for supplying mill goods to the Continental Army. In 1753 he helped his father in the construction of Ft. Bowman (aka Harmony Hall) near present day Strasburg, Virginia. Four of his younger brothers, Col. John (aka Johannes) (John Bowman (pioneer)), Col. Abraham, Maj. Joseph and Capt
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Mingo
The Mingo
Mingo
people are an Iroquoian-speaking group of Native Americans made up of peoples who migrated west to the Ohio Country
Ohio Country
in the mid-18th century, primarily Seneca and Cayuga. Anglo-Americans called these migrants mingos, a corruption of mingwe, an Eastern Algonquian name for Iroquoian-language groups in general. Mingos have also been called "Ohio Iroquois" and "Ohio Seneca". Most were forced to move to Indian Territory
Indian Territory
in the early 1830s under the Indian Removal
Indian Removal
program. At the turn of the 20th century, they lost control of communal lands when property was allocated to individual households in a government assimilation effort related to the Dawes Act and extinguishing Indian claims to prepare for admission of Oklahoma as a state
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Shawnee
The Shawnee
Shawnee
(Shaawanwaki, Ša˙wano˙ki and Shaawanowi lenaweeki[3]) are an Algonquian-speaking ethnic group indigenous to North America. In colonial times they were a semi-migratory Native American nation, primarily inhabiting areas of the Ohio
Ohio
Valley, extending from what became Ohio
Ohio
and Kentucky
Kentucky
eastward to West Virginia, Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Western Maryland; south to Alabama
Alabama
and South Carolina; and westward to Indiana, and Illinois. Pushed west by European-American pressure, the Shawnee
Shawnee
migrated to Missouri
Missouri
and Kansas, with some removed to Indian Territory
Indian Territory
(Oklahoma) west of the Mississippi River
Mississippi River
in the 1830s
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Michael Cresap
Captain Michael Cresap
Michael Cresap
(April 17, 1742 – October 18, 1775) was a noted frontiersman born in Maryland.Contents1 Biography 2 Legacy 3 See also 4 ReferencesBiography[edit] Cresap was the son of the pioneer Colonel Thomas Cresap (c.1702—c.1790). He spent part of his adult years in the Ohio Country as a trader and land developer. He led several raids against Indians who he believed were hostile to white settlement. The war leader Logan (c. 1723?—1780), of the Mingo
Mingo
Indians, accused Cresap of murdering his family
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Middle Island Creek
Middle Island Creek
Middle Island Creek
is a river, 77 miles (124 km) long, in northwestern West Virginia
West Virginia
in the United States. It is a tributary of the Ohio River, draining an area of 565 square miles (1,463 km²) on the unglaciated Allegheny Plateau
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Sistersville, West Virginia
Sistersville is a city in Tyler County, West Virginia, United States, along the Ohio River. The population was 1,396 at the 2010 census. The Sistersville Ferry
Sistersville Ferry
crosses the Ohio River
Ohio River
to the unincorporated community of Fly in Monroe County, Ohio.[6]Contents1 History1.1 Historical sites2 Geography 3 Demographics3.1 2010 census 3.2 2000 census4 Notable people 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Sistersville was named from the fact two sisters were the original owners of the town site.[7] The town was incorporated in 1839.[8] Historical sites[edit] The Sistersville City
City
Hall is a historic city hall building listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The City
City
Hall is contributing property of the Sistersville Historic District. Other listed historic properties in Sistersville include the E
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Ebenezer Zane
Ebenezer Zane
Ebenezer Zane
(October 7, 1747 – 1811) was an American pioneer, road builder and land speculator. Born in what is now Moorefield, West Virginia
Virginia
(which was then in the colony of Virginia), Zane established the settlement known as Fort Henry in Wheeling, Virginia
Virginia
(present-day West Virginia) on the Ohio
Ohio
River. Zane is also famous for blazing the trail known as Zane's Trace.Contents1 Family 2 At Fort Henry 3 Building Zane's Trace 4 Notes 5 ReferencesFamily[edit] Ebenezer Zane
Ebenezer Zane
was one of six children born to William Andrew Zane and his wife, Nancy Ann Nolan. He had four brothers: Silas (born 1745), Andrew (born 1749), Jonathan (born about 1750), and Isaac (born 1753), as well as one sister, Elizabeth "Betty" (born 1759). Ebenezer Zane married Elizabeth McColloch (October 30, 1748 – 1814)
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Kentucky
Kentucky
Kentucky
(/kənˈtʌki/ ( listen) kən-TUK-ee), officially the Commonwealth of Kentucky, is a state located in the east south-central region of the United States. Although styled as the "State of Kentucky" in the law creating it,[5] Kentucky
Kentucky
is one of four U.S. states constituted as a commonwealth (the others being Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Massachusetts). Originally a part of Virginia, in 1792 Kentucky
Kentucky
became the 15th state to join the Union. Kentucky
Kentucky
is the 37th most extensive and the 26th most populous of the 50 United States. Kentucky
Kentucky
is known as the "Bluegrass State", a nickname based on the bluegrass found in many of its pastures due to the fertile soil
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Native Americans In The United States
American Indian and Alaska
Alaska
Native (2010 Census Bureau)[1] One race: 2,932,248 are registered In combination with one or more of the other races listed: 2,288,331 Total: 5,220,579 ~ 1.6% of the total U.S
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George Rogers Clark
Lord Dunmore's WarBattle of Point PleasantAmerican Revolutionary WarIllinois campaignSiege of Fort SackvilleBattle of PiquaNorthwest Indian WarRelations John Clark III (father) Ann Rogers Clark (mother) General Jonathan Clark (brother) Captain William Clark
William Clark
(brother) Ann Clark Gwatmey (sister) Captain John Clark (brother) Lieutenant Richard Clark (brother) Captain Edmund Clark (brother) Lucy Clark Croghan (sister) Elizabeth Clark Anderson (sister) Frances "Fanny" Clark O'Fallon Minn Fitzhugh (sister)Signature George Rogers Clark
George Rogers Clark
(November 19, 1752 – February 13, 1818) was an American surveyor, soldier, and militia officer from Virginia
Virginia
who became the highest ranking American military officer on the northwestern frontier during the American Revolutionary War
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Little Kanawha River
The Little Kanawha River
Kanawha River
is a tributary of the Ohio River, 169 mi (269 km) long,[1] in western West Virginia
West Virginia
in the United States. Via the Ohio, it is part of the watershed of the Mississippi River, draining an area of 2,320 mi² (6,009 km²)[2] on the unglaciated portion of the Allegheny Plateau. It served as an important commercial water route in the early history of West Virginia, particularly in the logging and petroleum industries.[1][3]Contents1 Course 2 Tributaries 3 Name 4 See also 5 External links 6 ReferencesCourse[edit] The Little Kanawha rises in southern Upshur County, approximately 20 mi (32 km) south of Buckhannon
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