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Red Hat Enterprise Linux
Red Hat
Red Hat
Enterprise Linux
Linux
(RHEL) is a Linux
Linux
distribution developed by Red Hat
Red Hat
and targeted toward the commercial market. Red Hat
Red Hat
Enterprise Linux
Linux
is released in server versions for x86, x86-64, Itanium, PowerPC and IBM System z, and desktop versions for x86 and x86-64. All of the Red Hat's official support and training, together with the Red Hat Certification Program, focuses on the Red Hat
Red Hat
Enterprise Linux platform
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Groupe Bull
Bull SAS (also known as Groupe Bull, Bull Information Systems, or simply Bull) is a French-owned computer company headquartered in Les Clayes-sous-Bois, in the western suburbs of Paris. The company has also been known at various times as Bull General Electric, Honeywell Bull, CII Honeywell
Honeywell
Bull, and Bull HN. Bull was founded in 1931, as H.W. Egli - Bull, to capitalize on the punched card technology patents of Norwegian engineer Fredrik Rosing Bull
Fredrik Rosing Bull
(1882–1925).[1] After a reorganization in 1933, with new owners coming in, the name was changed to Compagnie des Machines Bull (CMB). The company has undergone many takeovers and mergers since its formation. In particular, it has had various ownership relations with General Electric, Honeywell, and NEC from the 1960s to the 1980s; and with Motorola, Debeka, and France
France
Télécom more recently
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Binary Blob
In the context of free and open-source software, a binary blob is a closed-source binary-only piece of software. The term usually refers to a closed-source kernel module loaded into the kernel of an open-source operating system, and is sometimes also applied to code running outside the kernel, such as system firmware images, microcode updates, or userland programs.[1][2][3][4][5] The term blob was first used in database management systems to describe a collection of binary data stored as a single entity. When computer hardware vendors provide complete technical documentation for their products, operating system developers are able to write hardware device drivers to be included in the operating system kernels
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Z/Architecture
z/Architecture, initially and briefly called ESA Modal Extensions (ESAME), is IBM's 6 4-bit
4-bit
instruction set architecture implemented by its mainframe computers. IBM
IBM
introduced its first z/Architecture-based system, the z900, in late 2000.[1] Later z/Architecture systems include the IBM
IBM
z800, z990, z890, System z9, System z10, zEnterprise 196, and zEnterprise 114. z/Architecture retains backward compatibility with previous 32-bit-data/31-bit-addressing architecture ESA/390
ESA/390
and its predecessors all the way back to the 32-bit-data/24-bit-addressing System/360
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Monolithic Kernel
A monolithic kernel is an operating system architecture where the entire operating system is working in kernel space and is alone in supervisor mode. The monolithic model differs from other operating system architectures (such as the microkernel architecture)[1][2] in that it alone defines a high-level virtual interface over computer hardware. A set of primitives or system calls implement all operating system services such as process management, concurrency, and memory management
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Linux Kernel
The Linux
Linux
kernel is an open-source monolithic Unix-like
Unix-like
computer operating system kernel. The Linux
Linux
family of operating systems is based on this kernel and deployed on both traditional computer systems such as personal computers and servers, usually in the form of Linux distributions,[9] and on various embedded devices such as routers, wireless access points, PBXes, set-top boxes, FTA receivers, smart TVs, PVRs, and NAS appliances. The Android operating system for tablet computers, smartphones, and smartwatches uses services provided by the Linux
Linux
kernel to implement its functionality. While the adoption on desktop computers is low, Linux-based operating systems dominate nearly every other segment of computing, from mobile devices to mainframes
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GNU Programs
This list of GNU
GNU
packages lists notable software packages developed for or maintained by the Free Software Foundation
Free Software Foundation
as
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User Interface
The user interface (UI), in the industrial design field of human–computer interaction, is the space where interactions between humans and machines occur. The goal of this interaction is to allow effective operation and control of the machine from the human end, whilst the machine simultaneously feeds back information that aids the operators' decision-making process. Examples of this broad concept of user interfaces include the interactive aspects of computer operating systems, hand tools, heavy machinery operator controls, and process controls. The design considerations applicable when creating user interfaces are related to or involve such disciplines as ergonomics and psychology. Generally, the goal of user interface design is to produce a user interface which makes it easy (self-explanatory), efficient, and enjoyable (user-friendly) to operate a machine in the way which produces the desired result
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Software License
A software license is a legal instrument (usually by way of contract law, with or without printed material) governing the use or redistribution of software. Under United States copyright law all software is copyright protected, in source code as also object code form.[2] The only exception is software in the public domain. A typical software license grants the licensee, typically an end-user, permission to use one or more copies of software in ways where such a use would otherwise potentially constitute copyright infringement of the software owner's exclusive rights under copyright law.Contents1 Software
Software
licenses and copyright law1.1 Ownership vs
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Free Software
Free software
Free software
or libre software[1][2] is computer software distributed under terms that allow users to run the software for any purpose as well as to study, change, and distribute it and any adapted versions.[3][4][5][6][7] Free software
Free software
is a matter of liberty, not price: users —individually or in cooperation with computer programmers— are free to do what they want with their copies of a free software (including profiting from them) regardless of how much is paid to obtain the program.[8][2] Computer programs are deemed free insofar as they give users (not just the developer) ultimate control over the first, thereby allowing them to control what their devices are programmed to do.[5][9] The right to study and modify a computer program entails that source code —the preferred format for making changes— be made available to users of that program
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Business
Business
Business
is the activity of making one's living or making money by producing or buying and selling goods or services.[1][2][3][4] Simply put, it is any activity or enterprise entered into for profit. It does not mean it is a company, a corporation, partnership, or have any such formal organization, but it can range from a street peddler to General Motors.[5] The term is also often used colloquially (but not by lawyers or public officials) to refer to a company, but this article will not deal with that sense of the word.Anyone carrying on an activity that earns them a profit is doing business or running a business, and perhaps this is why there is a misconception that business and company is the same thing. A business name structure does not separate the business entity from the owner, which means that the owner of the business is responsible and liable for all debts incurred by the business
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X86-32
IA-32 (short for " Intel
Intel
Architecture, 32-bit", sometimes also called i386[1][2])[3] is the 32-bit
32-bit
version of the x86 instruction set architecture, first implemented in the Intel 80386
Intel 80386
microprocessors in 1985. IA-32 is the first incarnation of x86 that supports 32-bit computing;[4] as a result, the "IA-32" term may be used as a metonym to refer to all x86 versions that support 32-bit
32-bit
computing.[5][6] The IA-32 instruction set was introduced in the Intel
Intel
80386 microprocessor in 1985 and, as of 2017[update], remains supported by contemporary PC microprocessors. Even though the instruction set has remained intact, the successive generations of microprocessors that run it have become much faster
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IBM System Z
IBM
IBM
Z[1] is a family name used by IBM
IBM
for all of its mainframe computers from the Z900 on
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Trademark
A trademark, trade mark, or trade-mark[1] is a recognizable sign, design, or expression which identifies products or services of a particular source from those of others,[2][3] although trademarks used to identify services are usually called service marks.[4][5] The trademark owner can be an individual, business organization, or any legal entity. A trademark may be located on a package, a label, a voucher, or on the product itself. For the sake of corporate identity, trademarks are often displayed on company buildings. The first legislative act concerning trademarks was passed by the Parliament of England
Parliament of England
in 1266 under the reign of Henry III, requiring all bakers to use a distinctive mark for the bread they sold. The first modern trademark laws emerged in the late 19th century. In France the first comprehensive trademark system in the world was passed into law in 1857
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Enterprise Software
Enterprise software, also known as enterprise application software (EAS), is computer software used to satisfy the needs of an organization rather than individual users
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Emerging Markets
An emerging market is a country that has some characteristics of a developed market, but does not meet standards to be a developed market.[1] This includes countries that may become developed markets in the future or were in the past.[2] The term "frontier market" is used for developing countries with slower economies than "emerging".[3][4] The economies of China
China
and India
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