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Red Barber
Walter Lanier "Red" Barber (February 17, 1908 – October 22, 1992) was an American sports commentator. Barber, nicknamed "The Ol' Redhead", was primarily identified with radio broadcasts of Major League Baseball, calling play-by-play across four decades with the Cincinnati Reds
Cincinnati Reds
(1934–1938), Brooklyn Dodgers
Brooklyn Dodgers
(1939–1953), and New York Yankees (1954–1966). Like his fellow sports pioneer Mel Allen, Barber also gained a niche calling college and professional American football in his primary market of New York City.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early years 1.2 Brooklyn
Brooklyn
Dodgers 1.3 New York Yankees 1.4 Later life2 Honors 3 In popular culture 4 Books by Red Barber 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksBiography[edit] Early years[edit] Barber was born in Columbus, Mississippi
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New York City English
New York City
New York City
English, or Metropolitan New York English,[1] is a regional dialect of American English
American English
spoken by many people in New York City and much of its surrounding metropolitan area. Described by sociolinguist William Labov as the most recognizable dialect in North America, the dialect is known through its association in the media with many public figures and fictional characters. Its features are most densely concentrated in New York City
New York City
proper and its immediate suburbs (whose residents often commute to New York City), but they also extend somewhat to the wider metropolitan area and the New York City diaspora in other regions. The dialect is widely known for its pronunciation system, the New York accent, which comprises a number of both conservative and innovative features
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Pete Reiser
Harold Patrick Reiser (March 17, 1919 – October 25, 1981), nicknamed "Pistol Pete", was an outfielder in Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
during the 1940s and early 1950s. He played primarily for the Brooklyn Dodgers, and later for the Boston Braves, Pittsburgh Pirates, and Cleveland Indians.Contents1 Early career 2 Being injury-prone 3 Later life 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksEarly career[edit] A native of St. Louis, Missouri, Reiser originally signed with his hometown Cardinals, but at age 19 he was among a group of minor league players declared free agents by Commissioner of Baseball
Commissioner of Baseball
Kenesaw Mountain Landis. Reportedly, Cardinal general manager Branch Rickey—mortified at losing a player of Reiser's caliber—arranged for the Dodgers to sign Reiser, hide him in the minors, then trade him back to St. Louis at a later date
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Cincinnati
Cincinnati
Cincinnati
(/ˌsɪnsɪˈnæti/ SIN-sih-NAT-ee) is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio
Ohio
and seat of Hamilton County.[7] Settled in 1788, the city was located at the north side of the confluence of the Licking River to the Ohio. The city drives the Cincinnati–Middletown–Wilmington combined statistical area, which had a population of 2,172,191 in the 2010 census.[8] With a population of 298,800, Cincinnati
Cincinnati
is the third-largest city proper in Ohio
Ohio
and the 65th-biggest in the United States. It is the fastest growing economic power in the Midwestern United States[9] and the 28th-biggest metropolitan statistical area in the United States
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Crosley Field
Crosley
Crosley
Field was a Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
park located in Cincinnati, Ohio. It was the home field of the National League's Cincinnati
Cincinnati
Reds from 1912 through June 24, 1970, and the original Cincinnati
Cincinnati
Bengals football team, members of the second (1937) and third American Football League (1940–41). Contrary to popular belief[according to whom?], it was not the original home of the current NFL franchise of the same name (the home of those Bengals in 1968 and 1969 was nearby Nippert Stadium, located on the campus of the University of Cincinnati). Crosley
Crosley
Field was on an asymmetrical block bounded by Findlay Street (south), Western Avenue (northeast, angling), York Street (north) and McLean Avenue (west) in the Queensgate section of the city
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CBS Radio Network
CBS
CBS
News Radio, formerly known as CBS
CBS
Radio News and historically known as the CBS
CBS
Radio Network, provides news to more than 1,000 radio stations throughout the United States. The network is owned by CBS Corporation; it is the last of the three original national U.S
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Brooklyn
Coordinates: 40°41′34″N 73°59′25″W / 40.69278°N 73.99028°W / 40.69278; -73.99028Brooklyn Kings CountyBorough of New York City County of New York StateClockwise from top left: Brooklyn
Brooklyn
Bridge, Brooklyn
Brooklyn
brownstones,
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Tallahassee, Florida
Tallahassee /ˌtæləˈhæsi/ is the capital of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Florida. It is the county seat and only incorporated municipality in Leon County. Tallahassee became the capital of Florida, then the Florida
Florida
Territory, in 1824. In 2016, the population was 190,894, making it the 7th-largest city in the U.S state of Florida, and the 126th-largest city in the United States.[6] The population of the Tallahassee metropolitan area
Tallahassee metropolitan area
was 379,627 as of 2016. Tallahassee is the largest city in the Florida
Florida
Panhandle region, and the main center for trade and agriculture in the Florida
Florida
Big Bend and Southwest Georgia regions. Tallahassee is home to Florida
Florida
State University, ranked the nation's thirty-third best public university by U.S
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Catchphrase
A catchphrase (alternatively spelled catch phrase) is a phrase or expression recognized by its repeated utterance. Such phrases often originate in popular culture and in the arts, and typically spread through word of mouth and a variety of mass media (such as films, internet, literature and publishing, television and radio). Some become the de facto or literal "trademark" or "signature" of the person or character with whom they originated, and can be instrumental in the typecasting (beneficially or otherwise) of a particular actor.Contents1 Culture 2 See also2.1 Lists 2.2 Related topics3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksCulture[edit] According to Richard Harris, a psychology professor at Kansas State University who studied why people like to cite films in social situations, using film quotes in everyday conversation is similar to telling a joke and a way to form solidarity with others
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Joe Hatten
Joseph Hilarian Hatten (November 7, 1916 – December 16, 1988) was a Major League Baseball pitcher. Hatten started in pro ball with Crookston in the old Northern League in 1937. Acquired by the Montreal Royals from the Minneapolis Millers of the American Association in the 1941–42 off-season, Hatten pitched for the Royals briefly in 1942 before entering the U.S. Navy.[1] Upon his discharge four years later, he first saw service with the Brooklyn Dodgers. Possessing a "rubber arm", Hatten worked as both a starting pitcher and a reliever, even appearing in both ends of a double-header.[2] Hatten's first year in the big leagues in 1946 saw him post a 14–11 won-lost record with a 2.84 earned run average, eighth-best in the National League. He followed that season with a career-high 17 wins with eight losses and a 3.63 ERA
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Powel Crosley, Jr.
Powel Crosley
Crosley
Jr. (September 18, 1886 – March 28, 1961) was an American inventor, industrialist, and entrepreneur. He and his brother Lewis were responsible for many "firsts" in consumer products and broadcasting. He was the builder of the Crosley
Crosley
automobiles. In World War II, the Crosley
Crosley
company turned out more fuzes than any other manufacturer, and made several production design innovations. Crosley was the owner of the Cincinnati Reds
Cincinnati Reds
major league baseball team for many years. Crosley
Crosley
Field, a stadium in Cincinnati, Ohio, was renamed for him
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Ralph Branca
Ralph Theodore Joseph Branca (January 6, 1926 – November 23, 2016) was an American professional baseball pitcher who played 12 seasons in Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
(MLB), from 1944 through 1956. Branca played for the Brooklyn Dodgers
Brooklyn Dodgers
(1944–1953, 1956), Detroit Tigers (1953–1954), and New York Yankees
New York Yankees
(1954). He was a three-time All-Star. In a 1951 playoff, Branca allowed a walk-off home run to Bobby Thomson, known as the "Shot Heard 'Round the World".Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Later life 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksEarly life[edit] Ralph Branca
Ralph Branca
was born in Mount Vernon, New York, as the fifteenth of seventeen children.[1] His father was John Branca, a trolley car conductor from Italy
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Al Gionfriddo
Albert Francis Gionfriddo (March 8, 1922 – March 14, 2003) was an American professional baseball player who played in Major League Baseball
Baseball
as an outfielder.Contents1 Career 2 Personal life 3 References 4 External linksCareer[edit] Gionfriddo made his major league debut on September 23, 1944 at the age of 22 with the Pittsburgh Pirates. He was a career .266 hitter whose best year was in 1945 when he hit .284 with 9 triples and 74 runs scored for the Pirates.[1][2] He played in the majors for four years. He was acquired by the Brooklyn Dodgers
Brooklyn Dodgers
from the Pirates midway through the 1947 season, and he is most famous for his heroic catch of a drive off the bat of the New York Yankees' Joe DiMaggio
Joe DiMaggio
in Game 6 of the 1947 World Series.[3][4][5] The Dodgers led the Yankees 8–5 going into the bottom of the 6th inning when Gionfriddo was brought in as a defensive replacement
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Cookie Lavagetto
As playerPittsburgh Pirates (1934–1936) Brooklyn Dodgers (1937–1941, 1946–1947)As managerWashington Senators / Minnesota Twins (1957–1961)Career highlights and awards4× All-Star (1938–1941)Harry Arthur "Cookie" Lavagetto (December 1, 1912 – August 10, 1990) was a third baseman, manager and coach in American Major League Baseball. He was the pinch hitter whose double ruined Bill Bevens' no-hitter in Game 4 of the 1947 World Series and gave his Brooklyn Dodgers a victory over the New York Yankees, a game known as The Cookie Game.Contents1 The Cookie Game 2 Major league career 3 Return to minors and major league coach 4 Senators'/Twins' manager 5 Later career 6 Death 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksThe Cookie Game[edit] On October 3, 1947 at Ebbets Field, Bevens was ahead 2–1 going into the bottom of the ninth inning, and got two outs
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Bill Bevens
Floyd Clifford "Bill" Bevens (October 21, 1916 – October 26, 1991) was a right-handed Major League Baseball pitcher. He stood 6 ft 3 in (1.91 m) and weighed 210 lb (95 kg). He signed with the New York Yankees at 20 in 1937, and spent seven seasons in their minor league system, throwing two no-hitters for the Wenatchee Chiefs before finally making his major league debut with the Yankees on May 12, 1944 at the age of 27. In his third minor league season, he pitched his first no-hitter on September 21, 1939, against the Tacoma Tigers, winning 8-0 with the only opposing baserunner reaching on an error, giving his Wenatchee Chiefs their first playoff win after losing the first three games of the series to Tacoma.[1] He pitched four years for the Yanks when they finally brought him up to the majors, amassing a career record of 40–36 with a 3.08 ERA. His best year was 1946, when he went 16–13 and 2.23
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No-hitter
In baseball, a no-hitter (also known as a no-hit game and colloquially as a no-no) is a game in which a team was not able to record a single hit. Major League Baseball
Baseball
(MLB) officially defines a no-hitter as a completed game in which a team that batted in at least nine innings recorded no hits. A pitcher who prevents the opposing team from achieving a hit is said to have "thrown a no-hitter". This is a rare accomplishment for a pitcher or pitching staff: only 296 have been thrown in Major League Baseball
Baseball
history since 1876, an average of about two per year. In most cases in MLB, no-hitters are recorded by a single pitcher who throws a complete game; one thrown by two or more pitchers is a combined no-hitter
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