HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Red-billed Chough
The red-billed chough, Cornish chough or simply chough (/ˈtʃʌf/ CHUF; Pyrrhocorax
Pyrrhocorax
pyrrhocorax), is a bird in the crow family, one of only two species in the genus Pyrrhocorax. Its eight subspecies breed on mountains and coastal cliffs from the western coasts of Ireland
Ireland
and Britain east through southern Europe and North Africa
North Africa
to Central Asia, India
India
and China. This bird has glossy black plumage, a long curved red bill, red legs, and a loud, ringing call. It has a buoyant acrobatic flight with widely spread primaries. The red-billed chough pairs for life and displays fidelity to its breeding site, which is usually a cave or crevice in a cliff face. It builds a wool-lined stick nest and lays three eggs
[...More...]

"Red-billed Chough" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Johann Friedrich Gmelin
Johann Friedrich Gmelin
Johann Friedrich Gmelin
(8 August 1748 – 1 November 1804) was a German naturalist, botanist, entomologist, herpetologist, and malacologist.Contents1 Education 2 Career 3 Legacy 4 Publications 5 References 6 External linksEducation[edit] Johann Friedrich Gmelin
Johann Friedrich Gmelin
was born as the eldest son of Philipp Friedrich Gmelin in 1748 in Tübingen. He studied medicine under his father[1] at University of Tübingen
Tübingen
and graduated with an MD in 1768, with a thesis entitled: Irritabilitatem vegetabilium, in singulis plantarum partibus exploratam ulterioribusque experimentis confirmatam., defended under the presidency of Ferdinand Christoph Oetinger,[2] whom he thanks with the words Patrono et praeceptore in aeternum pie devenerando, pro summis in medicina obtinendis honoribus. Career[edit] In 1769, Gmelin became an adjunct professor of medicine at University of Tübingen
[...More...]

"Johann Friedrich Gmelin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Greek Language
Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά [eliniˈka], elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα [eliniˈci ˈɣlosa] ( listen), ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece
Greece
and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean
[...More...]

"Greek Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Local Extinction
Local extinction
Local extinction
or extirpation is the condition of a species (or other taxon) that ceases to exist in the chosen geographic area of study, though it still exists elsewhere.[1] Local extinctions are contrasted with global extinctions. Local extinctions may be followed by a replacement of the species taken from other locations; wolf reintroduction is an example of this.Contents1 Conservation 2 IUCN subpopulation and stock assessments 3 Local extinction
Local extinction
events 4 See also 5 ReferencesConservation[edit] Local extinctions mark a change in the ecology of an area. The area of study chosen may reflect a natural subpopulation, political boundaries, or both. The Cetacean Specialist Group of the IUCN has assessed the threat of a local extinction of the Black Sea stock of Harbour Porpoise
Harbour Porpoise
(Phocoena phocoena) that touches six different countries
[...More...]

"Local Extinction" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Sikkim
Sikkim
Sikkim
(/ˈsɪkɪm/) is a state in Northeast India. It borders The Autonomous Region Of Tibet
Tibet
in its north and east, Bhutan
Bhutan
in its east, Nepal
Nepal
in its west and the Indian state of West Bengal
West Bengal
in its south. Sikkim
Sikkim
is also located close to the Siliguri Corridor
Siliguri Corridor
near Bangladesh. Sikkim
Sikkim
is the least populous and second smallest among the Indian states. A part of the Eastern Himalaya, Sikkim
Sikkim
is notable for its biodiversity, including alpine and subtropical climates, as well as being a host to Kanchenjunga, the highest peak in India
India
and third highest on Earth. Sikkim's capital and largest city is Gangtok
[...More...]

"Sikkim" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

North Africa
North Africa
Africa
is a collective term for a group of Mediterranean countries situated in the northern-most region of the African continent. The term "North Africa" has no single accepted definition. It is sometimes defined as stretching from the Atlantic
Atlantic
shores of Morocco
Morocco
in the west, to the Suez Canal
Suez Canal
and the Red Sea
Red Sea
in the east. Others have limited it to the countries of Algeria, Morocco, and Tunisia, a region known by the French during colonial times as “Afrique du Nord” and by the Arabs
Arabs
as the Maghreb
Maghreb
(“West”). The most commonly accepted definition includes Algeria, Morocco, and Tunisia, as well as Libya
Libya
and Egypt
[...More...]

"North Africa" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Charles Vaurie
Charles Vaurie (7 July 1906, Beaulieu-sur-Dordogne, France
France
– 13 May 1975, Reading, Pennsylvania) was a French-born American ornithologist. He was born in France, but moved to Trenton, New Jersey
Trenton, New Jersey
as a youth. He studied at New York University
New York University
and then qualified as a dentist at the University of Pennsylvania
University of Pennsylvania
in 1928. An interest in painting birds developed, and after marrying his entomologist wife, Patricia Wilson, in 1934, the two shared numerous field trips. Vaurie became associated with the American Museum of Natural History and by 1946 he was a Research Associate. He went on to produce more than 150 ornithological publications. His most important work was a systematic review of Palearctic
Palearctic
birds. By 1956, he was a full-time ornithologist at AMNH, and rose to Curator by 1967
[...More...]

"Charles Vaurie" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Isle Of Man
The Isle of Man
Isle of Man
(Manx: Ellan Vannin [ˈɛlʲən ˈvanɪn]), also known simply as Mann (/mæn/; Manx: Mannin [ˈmanɪn]), is a self-governing British Crown dependency in the Irish Sea
Irish Sea
between the islands of Great Britain and Ireland. The head of state is Queen Elizabeth II, who holds the title of Lord of Mann
Lord of Mann
and is represented by a Lieutenant Governor. Defence is the responsibility of the United Kingdom. Ranked by the World Bank
World Bank
as the 5th richest nation in the world by GDP per capita,[6] the largest sectors are insurance and eGaming with 17% of GNP each, followed by ICT and banking with 9% each.[7] The island has been inhabited since before 6500 BC. Gaelic cultural influence began in the 5th century and the Manx language, a branch of the Gaelic languages, emerged
[...More...]

"Isle Of Man" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Gambia
The Gambia
The Gambia
(/ˈɡæmbiə/ ( listen)), officially the Republic
Republic
of The Gambia,[5][6] is a country in West Africa
West Africa
that is entirely surrounded by Senegal
Senegal
except for its coastline on the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
at its western end. It is the smallest country on mainland Africa.[7] The Gambia
The Gambia
is situated on either side of the Gambia River, the nation's namesake, which flows through the centre of The Gambia
The Gambia
and empties into the Atlantic Ocean. Its area is 10,689 square kilometres (4,127 sq mi) with a population of 1,857,181 as of the April 2013 census
[...More...]

"Gambia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Systema Naturae
Systema Naturae
Systema Naturae
(originally in Latin
Latin
written Systema Naturæ with the ligature æ) is one of the major works of the Swedish botanist, zoologist and physician Carl Linnaeus
Carl Linnaeus
(1707–1778) and introduced the Linnaean taxonomy. Although the system, now known as binomial nomenclature, was partially developed by the Bauhin brothers, Gaspard and Johann, 200 years earlier,[2] Linnaeus
Linnaeus
was first to use it consistently throughout his book. The first edition was published in 1735
[...More...]

"Systema Naturae" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Marmaduke Tunstall
Marmaduke Tunstall
Marmaduke Tunstall
(1743 – 11 October 1790) was an English ornithologist and collector. He was the author of Ornithologica Britannica (1771), probably the first British work to use binomial nomenclature. Tunstall was born at Burton Constable
Burton Constable
in Yorkshire. In 1760 he succeeded to the family estates of Scargill, Hutton, Long Villers and Wycliffe. Being a Catholic, he was educated at Douai
Douai
in France. On completing his studies he took up residence in Welbeck Street, London, where he formed an extensive museum, as well as a large collection of living birds and animals. He is known for discovering the Peregrine falcon
[...More...]

"Marmaduke Tunstall" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Greece
Greece
Greece
(Greek: Ελλάδα), officially the Hellenic Republic (Ελληνική Δημοκρατία), historically also known as Hellas, is a country located in Southern Europe,[10] with a population of approximately 11 million as of 2016. Athens
Athens
is the nation's capital and largest city, followed by Thessaloniki. Greece
Greece
is located at the crossroads of Europe, Asia, and Africa. Situated on the southern tip of the Balkan Peninsula, it shares land borders with Albania
Albania
to the northwest, the Republic of Macedonia
Republic of Macedonia
and Bulgaria
Bulgaria
to the north, and Turkey
Turkey
to the northeast
[...More...]

"Greece" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Philopatry
Philopatry
Philopatry
is the tendency of an organism to stay in or habitually return to a particular area.[1] The causes of philopatry are numerous, but natal philopatry, where animals return to their birthplace to breed, may be the most common.[2] The term derives from the Greek 'home-loving', although in recent years the term has been applied to more than just the animal's birthplace. Recent usage refers to animals returning to the same area to breed despite not being born there, and migratory species that demonstrate site fidelity: reusing stopovers, staging points, and wintering grounds.[3] Some of the known reasons for organisms to be philopatric would be for mating (reproduction), survival, migration, parental care, resources, etc.
[...More...]

"Philopatry" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Coloeus
Coloeus
Coloeus
is a genus of the bird that is sometimes treated as a subgenus of Corvus, including the IUCN
[...More...]

"Coloeus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Onomatopoeia
An onomatopoeia (/ˌɒnəˌmætəˈpiːə, -ˌmɑː-/ ( listen);[1][2] from the Greek ὀνοματοποιία;[3] ὄνομα for "name"[4] and ποιέω for "I make",[5] adjectival form: "onomatopoeic" or "onomatopoetic") is a word that phonetically imitates, resembles or suggests the sound that it describes. As an uncountable noun, onomatopoeia refers to the property of such words
[...More...]

"Onomatopoeia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

White-winged Chough
The white-winged chough (Corcorax melanorhamphos) is one of only two surviving members of the Australian mud-nest builders family, Corcoracidae, and is the only member of the genus Corcorax
[...More...]

"White-winged Chough" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.