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Real Canadian Liquorstore
The Real Canadian Liquorstore is an Albertan chain of liquor stores owned by Loblaws subsidiary Westfair Foods. The name is similar to that of the Real Canadian Superstore, a hypermarket chain also owned by Loblaws. The chain does not operate outside Alberta
Alberta
because legislation in other Canadian provinces and territories
Canadian provinces and territories
keeps liquor retailing strictly regulated and government-owned. Alberta
Alberta
law does not permit a liquor store to be combined with a grocery store or similar operation and does not allow liquor to be sold in a grocery store or vice versa (limited exceptions are made for sparsely populated rural areas). However, Real Canadian Liquorstores are invariably located on the same property as another Westfair store, usually a Real Canadian Superstore
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Alberta
Alberta
Alberta
(/ælˈbɜːrtə/ ( listen)) is a western province of Canada. With an estimated population of 4,067,175 as of 2016 census,[1] it is Canada's fourth most populous province and the most populous of Canada's three prairie provinces. Its area is about 660,000 square kilometres (250,000 sq mi). Alberta
Alberta
and its neighbour Saskatchewan
Saskatchewan
were districts of the Northwest Territories until they were established as provinces on September 1, 1905.[5] The premier has been Rachel Notley
Rachel Notley
since May 2015. Alberta
Alberta
is bounded by the provinces of British Columbia
British Columbia
to the west and Saskatchewan
Saskatchewan
to the east, the Northwest Territories
Northwest Territories
to the north, and the U.S. state
U.S

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Liquor Store
A liquor store is a retail shop that predominantly sells prepackaged alcoholic beverages — typically in bottles — intended to be consumed off the store's premises. Depending on region and local idiom (social issue), they may also be called bottle store, off licence, bottle shop, bottle-o, package store (in New England, called a packie),[1][2] ABC store, state store, or other similar terms
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Hypermarket
In commerce, a hypermarket is a superstore combining a supermarket and a department store. The result is an expansive retail facility carrying a wide range of products under one roof, including full groceries lines and general merchandise. In theory, hypermarkets allow customers to satisfy all their routine shopping needs in one trip. The term hypermarket (French: hypermarché) was coined in 1968 by French trade expert Jacques Pictet.[1] Hypermarkets, like other big-box stores, typically have business models focusing on high-volume, low-margin sales. Typically covering an area of 5,000 to 15,000 square metres (54,000 to 161,000 sq ft), they generally have more than 200,000 different brands of merchandise available at any one time
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Canadian Provinces And Territories
The provinces and territories of Canada
Canada
are the administrative divisions that are responsible for the delivery of sub-national governance within the geographical areas of Canada
Canada
under the authority of the Canadian Constitution. In the 1867 Canadian Confederation, three provinces of British North America—New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and the Province of Canada
Canada
(which, upon Confederation, was divided into Ontario
Ontario
and Quebec)—were united to form a federated colony, which eventually became a sovereign nation in the next century. Over its history, Canada's international borders have changed several times, and the country has grown from the original four provinces to the current ten provinces and three territories
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Liquor
A distilled beverage, spirit, liquor, hard liquor or hard alcohol is an alcoholic beverage produced by distillation of liquid drinks made with grains, fruit, or vegetables that have already gone through alcoholic fermentation. The distillation process purifies the liquid and removes diluting components like water, for the purpose of increasing its proportion of alcohol content (commonly expressed as alcohol by volume, ABV).[1] As distilled beverages contain significantly more alcohol, they are considered "harder" – in North America, the term hard liquor is used to distinguish distilled beverages from undistilled ones. As examples, this term does not include beverages such as beer, wine, mead, sake, or cider, as they are fermented but not distilled. These all have a relatively low alcohol content, typically less than 15%. Brandy
Brandy
is a spirit produced by the distillation of wine, and has an ABV of over 35%
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Grocery Store
A grocery store or grocer's shop is a retail shop that primarily sells food. A grocer is a bulk seller of food. Grocery stores offer non-perishable foods that are packaged in bottles, boxes, and cans; some also have bakeries, butchers, delis, and fresh produce. Large grocery stores that stock significant amounts of non-food products, such as clothing and household items, are called supermarkets
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Beer
Beer
Beer
is one of the oldest[1][2][3] and most widely consumed[4] alcoholic drinks in the world, and the third most popular drink overall after water and tea.[5] Beer
Beer
is brewed from cereal grains—most commonly from malted barley, though wheat, maize (corn), and rice are also used. During the brewing process, fermentation of the starch sugars in the wort produces ethanol and carbonation in the resulting beer.[6] Most modern beer is brewed with hops, which add bitterness and other flavours and act as a natural preservative and stabilizing agent. Other flavouring agents such as gruit, herbs, or fruits may be included or used instead of hops
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Wine
Wine
Wine
(from Latin
Latin
vinum) is an alcoholic beverage made from grapes, generally Vitis
Vitis
vinifera, fermented without the addition of sugars, acids, enzymes, water, or other nutrients.[1] Yeast consumes the sugar in the grapes and converts it to ethanol and carbon dioxide. Different varieties of grapes and strains of yeasts produce different styles of wine. These variations result from the complex interactions between the biochemical development of the grape, the reactions involved in fermentation, the terroir, and the production process. Many countries enact legal appellations intended to define styles and qualities of wine. These typically restrict the geographical origin and permitted varieties of grapes, as well as other aspects of wine production
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Hard Liquor
A distilled beverage, spirit, liquor, hard liquor or hard alcohol is an alcoholic beverage produced by distillation of liquid drinks made with grains, fruit, or vegetables that have already gone through alcoholic fermentation. The distillation process purifies the liquid and removes diluting components like water, for the purpose of increasing its proportion of alcohol content (commonly expressed as alcohol by volume, ABV).[1] As distilled beverages contain significantly more alcohol, they are considered "harder" – in North America, the term hard liquor is used to distinguish distilled beverages from undistilled ones. As examples, this term does not include beverages such as beer, wine, mead, sake, or cider, as they are fermented but not distilled. These all have a relatively low alcohol content, typically less than 15%. Brandy
Brandy
is a spirit produced by the distillation of wine, and has an ABV of over 35%
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President's Choice
Owner Loblaw CompaniesWebsite www.presidentschoice.caPresident's Choice (French: Le choix du Président) also known as “PC”, is a private label or store brand owned by Loblaw Companies Limited. President’s Choice includes a wide variety of grocery and household products, in addition to financial services and mobile phones. President’s Choice products are available across the company’s various retail banners, which include Loblaws, Loblaw Great Food, Dominion, No Frills, Real Canadian Superstore, Maxi, Provigo, Extra Foods, Your Independent Grocer, Atlantic Superstore, Zehrs Markets, Valu-mart, Fortinos, and Shoppers Drug Mart. Many storefronts promote themselves as "The Home of President’s Choice".A row of President's Choice Club Soda.Contents1 History1.1 Azimi vs. President's Choice court case 1.2 President's Blend 1.3 Development 1.4 Insider’s Report 1.5 The Decadent 1.6 G.R.E.E.N 1.7 Growth 1.8 U.S
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Loblaw Companies
Loblaw Companies Limited is the largest Canadian food retailer that encompasses corporate and franchise supermarkets operating under 22 regional and market segment banners (including Loblaws), as well as pharmacies, banking and apparel.[3] Loblaw operates a private label program that includes grocery and household items, clothing, baby products, pharmaceuticals, cellular phones, general merchandise, and financial services. Loblaw brands include President's Choice, No Name, Joe Fresh, T&T, Exact, Seaquest, Azami, and Teddy's Choice.[4] Most of Loblaw's 136,000 full-time and part-time employees are members of the United Food and Commercial Workers, with the exception of workers at The Real Canadian Wholesale Club in Alberta, who are members of the Christian Labour Association of Canada. Loblaw's regional food distribution divisions include Westfair Foods Ltd. in Western Canada and Northern Ontario, National Grocers Co. Ltd. in Ontario, Provigo Inc
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Alberta Gaming And Liquor Commission
The Alberta
Alberta
Gaming and Liquor Commission (or AGLC) is an agent of the government of the Canadian province
Canadian province
of Alberta, and regulates alcoholic beverage and gaming-related activities. The AGLC was created in 1996 by combining the responsibilities and operations of the Alberta
Alberta
Liquor Control Board (ALCB), Alberta
Alberta
Lotteries, the Alberta Gaming Commission, Alberta
Alberta
Lotteries and Gaming and the Gaming Control Branch
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Real Canadian Superstore
Real Canadian Superstore
Real Canadian Superstore
is a chain of supermarkets owned by Canadian food retailing giant Loblaw Companies. Its name is often shortened to Superstore. Originating in Western Canada
Western Canada
in the late 1970s/early 1980s, the banner expanded into Ontario
Ontario
in the early 2000s as Loblaw attempts to fend off competition from department stores including U.S.-based Walmart. Loblaw has tested alternative banners at some locations in Ontario, with some labelled as "Loblaw Superstore", and a few others as simply "Superstore"; for a time this was reflected in the chain's marketing which used a separate logo to advertise all of these banners
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Real Canadian Liquorstore
The Real Canadian Liquorstore is an Albertan chain of liquor stores owned by Loblaws subsidiary Westfair Foods. The name is similar to that of the Real Canadian Superstore, a hypermarket chain also owned by Loblaws. The chain does not operate outside Alberta
Alberta
because legislation in other Canadian provinces and territories
Canadian provinces and territories
keeps liquor retailing strictly regulated and government-owned. Alberta
Alberta
law does not permit a liquor store to be combined with a grocery store or similar operation and does not allow liquor to be sold in a grocery store or vice versa (limited exceptions are made for sparsely populated rural areas). However, Real Canadian Liquorstores are invariably located on the same property as another Westfair store, usually a Real Canadian Superstore
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